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  1. Hackinmage is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/10/2008 4:59pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: muay thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    worth it to switch to southpaw?

    I was wondering if its worth it to switch to southpaw, i'm more comfortable orthodox, but i'm left handed. I know it's odd.

    I trained with various camps for a couple of years to fight MMA, but most of my style was bjj/tkd i needed a stronger striking style so 3 years ago i started doing wing chun and two years ago i changed out for muay thai.

    I'm currently going to med school so for about 1 year i won't be able to train with a trainer, but as i have a bag and have a relatively competant leg i figure i could at least get comfortable in a south paw stance.

    In the end the question is, is it worth it?
      #1
  2. Hackinmage is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/10/2008 5:39pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: muay thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    btw it's not that i dont want a coach it's just that within a 50 mile radius I am the most competant fighter around (in coaching and actually fighting) which isn't saying much
      #2
  3. gallantknight is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/11/2008 12:55am


     Style: CMA/Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Personally, I think it'd be a good idea to be able to utilize both of your sides properly. There's nothing wrong with trying it, see for yourself if you'll like it better.

    That said, I'm a southpaw myself, and I find that sometimes, for my opponents, there's a sort of temporary 'wtf' moment when I do everything opposite of how they've trained with orthodox people.

    Of course, I'm still fairly new, so maybe that shock of fighting someone who isn't orthodox wears off once you've faced them a couple times.

    Still, I think it's a good idea to be able to switch it up, you know? Being able to switch your groove and your rhythm when fighting is good. When one thing doesn't work, it's nice to have other things to fall back on.
      #3
  4. alex is offline
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    STOP POSTING!

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    Oct 2003
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    Posted On:
    2/11/2008 1:29am

    supporting member
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i could count the number of successful fighters ive seen who switch their stance up on one hand.

    go southpaw imo.
      #4
  5. Steve is offline
    Steve's Avatar

    The gift that keeps on giving

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    Posted On:
    2/11/2008 2:11am

    supporting member
     Style: On hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex
    i could count the number of successful fighters ive seen who switch their stance up on one hand.

    go southpaw imo.
    Alex, you need to be way more clear. Can you elaborate?

    Hackinmage, sounds like you won't have anyone to train with for quite awhile. As long as your working out, experimentation with new stuff will keep things fresh for you (since you won't have others to work with).

    Work with the southpaw and see what you like. Nothing like working with someone in real life, though.
      #5
  6. mrblackmagic is offline
    mrblackmagic's Avatar

    My pleasure.

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    Posted On:
    2/11/2008 2:59pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: yang taichi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If you feel more comfortable as an orthodox, you should probably stay orthodox. I'd only switch if it didn't work for you.

    When I boxed, I switched to southpaw so I could be a better counterpuncher (amongst a long list of other personal reasons). I was (and still sorta am) a little guy so being able to stop or wake someone up off a lead hand, that doesn't get as tired, is a plus.
    Sumus extra manum tuam.
      #6
  7. MastaChance is offline

    Registered Member

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    Nov 2006
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    Lawrenceville, Ga
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    802

    Posted On:
    2/11/2008 3:30pm


     Style: Muay Thai/BJJ/Boxing/MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Hackinmage
    I was wondering if its worth it to switch to southpaw, i'm more comfortable orthodox, but i'm left handed. I know it's odd.

    I trained with various camps for a couple of years to fight MMA, but most of my style was bjj/tkd i needed a stronger striking style so 3 years ago i started doing wing chun and two years ago i changed out for muay thai.

    I'm currently going to med school so for about 1 year i won't be able to train with a trainer, but as i have a bag and have a relatively competant leg i figure i could at least get comfortable in a south paw stance.

    In the end the question is, is it worth it?
    Man I am wondering the same thing. I am left handed, but fight orthodox, I throw with my right hand but catch eat write draw with the left. If I am to play guitar or somthing then i do it right handed, i skate right handed, it's weird, I really want to know how we can be lefties yet do everything like a righty? I would also like to know if it is better or even at all possible to switch stances. I can fight southpaw, but i am not as fluid as i am orthodox. Maybe were just mutants, lol.
      #7
  8. Hackinmage is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/11/2008 4:04pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: muay thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    haha i'm in the same situation. I would like the southpaw if nothing else for the sheer advantage being a southpaw gets.

    if you don't mind blackmagic dude, how long did it take you to retrain?
      #8
  9. WhiteShark is offline
    WhiteShark's Avatar

    1% Shark is better than you.

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    Posted On:
    2/11/2008 5:26pm

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    How many times do I have to lock your threads Hackinmage before you stop posting crap in Strikeistan?

    I told you that trying to figure this out while self-training is useless and probably destructive to your own form. If all of your Muay Thai coaching came from orthodox then you better stay orthodox unless you have a coach to watch your form while you try to switch over.

    If you insist on trying to figure this out by asking people that can't see you go to Newbietown or Git-mo.
      #9
  10. WhiteShark is offline
    WhiteShark's Avatar

    1% Shark is better than you.

    Join Date
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    Atlanta GA
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    Posted On:
    2/11/2008 5:29pm

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by MastaChance
    Man I am wondering the same thing. I am left handed, but fight orthodox, I throw with my right hand but catch eat write draw with the left. If I am to play guitar or somthing then i do it right handed, i skate right handed, it's weird, I really want to know how we can be lefties yet do everything like a righty? I would also like to know if it is better or even at all possible to switch stances. I can fight southpaw, but i am not as fluid as i am orthodox. Maybe were just mutants, lol.
    I actually see Chance all the time so I am comfortable answering this:
    Since you mostly plan to fight MMA you should use which ever stance improves your sprawl. This assumes you can already strike effectively out of either stance.
      #10

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