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  1. BumFu is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    223

    Posted On:
    2/01/2008 6:50pm


     Style: None

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Dsimon3387
    . . . his advocacy of Aikido was very specific and not for Aikido as a whole . .
    If I remember right, and itís been a few years since Iíve seen his forum, he encouraged studying Aikido beyond just a few moves he found useful. The problem with that is that Aikido sucks and gives its practitioners dangerous illusions about their abilities, so the best advice is avoid its dojos like the plague. You make a decent case for learning one or two particular wrist-locks, but for Aikido as a wholeó well, even a broken clock is right twice a day.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dsimon3387
    In general I would say that Peyton has a limited but good message that he gets across. He is definitely the most realistic guy I have met of the suite and boot crowd....
    He always struck me as an intelligent & educated guy, which isnít usually the type of guy who has lived the life Quinn has. My more limited advice is avoid dive bars and train at a good MMA gym.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenJonas
    Wow, the ones quoted above are friggen gold. We need to get this guy over here.
    Shoot him an email: quinnp1@aol.com

    He might appreciate the chance to respond to a thread about him.
  2. MJ Dougherty is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NE England
    Posts
    103

    Posted On:
    2/01/2008 7:04pm


     Style: Ju-Jitsu, Self-Defence

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    At risk of being burned as a heretic, I'd say that you can learn a lot about how joints work (and can be dismantled) and such like from studying Aikido. As a whole fighting art it's, well, 'limited', in my opinion but there's learning to be had there.

    Problem is all the other stuff that you usually find in Aikido places - the holier-than-thou attitide or what my mate calls 'Passive-Aggressive Tree-Hugging Hippy ****'.

    Oh, and conversations like this get wearying after a time:

    "Big guys can be a problem"
    "Not for us. Aikido uses the opponent's wieght against him. The bigger he is, the more vulnerable."
    "Umm, have you actually tried that?"

    "I train twice a week."
    "Yes, but have you TRIED that weight-against-him thing with a non-compliant big guy?"
    "Of course not, he'd get hurt."
    "(Sigh)"

    If you can get past that sort of thing - which is a problem with students rather than the art itself, there are some sound principles and useful techniques buried in Aikido. It can be learned from sure enough. It's just that most Aikido classes don't really have any idea what they're trying to do. They get lost in the 'non-violent martial art' thing.

    Have I learned useful things from Aikido people? Yes.
    Would I train in Aikido? Probably not.
    Do I think I could use Aikido as it's usually taught for any useful purpose? Hell no.

    If Peyton Quinn is saying that studying Aikido can be valuable, that's a fair point. I don't think he's saying becoming a typical aikido-ka is the way to ultimate badassness.
  3. Dsimon3387 is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    san francisco
    Posts
    3,079

    Posted On:
    2/02/2008 2:31am

    Join us... or die
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by BumFu
    If I remember right, and itís been a few years since Iíve seen his forum, he encouraged studying Aikido beyond just a few moves he found useful. The problem with that is that Aikido sucks and gives its practitioners dangerous illusions about their abilities, so the best advice is avoid its dojos like the plague. You make a decent case for learning one or two particular wrist-locks, but for Aikido as a wholeó well, even a broken clock is right twice a day.


    He always struck me as an intelligent & educated guy, which isnít usually the type of guy who has lived the life Quinn has. My more limited advice is avoid dive bars and train at a good MMA gym.


    Shoot him an email: quinnp1@aol.com

    He might appreciate the chance to respond to a thread about him.

    Most guys from our generation ( I am about Peyton's age) were taught to value a few techniques from ANY art and do them very well. Even the fighters of the day only used a few techniques. Thats just the way martial arts were studied. 'As far as the rest of Aikido.... well practicioners of the art and the stink of enlightenement do make it very unmartial.

    You know I wish I had a nickel for everytime I told somoene to go to the type of establishment that is fun and safe.... I don't go to the type of bars I used to work in as a bouncer. It is good advice to train hard, properly and avoid danger.
  4. brokenclavicle is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Costa Rica
    Posts
    33

    Posted On:
    2/05/2008 1:18pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Freestyle MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Personally, I have read both of Quinn's books (barroom and real fighting) and found them insightful and informative, especially for those used to the more maintream view of MA. On his second book he even mentions his admiration at the up-and-coming UFC, where he mentions that, to his knowledge, it is the only tournament/event where there's real fighting going on and competition is not defined by points. I believe the book was published some time after the first couple of UFC's back when they were in tournament format. This demonstrates that, though his area of expertise is evidently focused on bouncing and not necessarily street fighting in general, he has the presence of mind to acknowledge a good thing when he sees it.
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