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  1. #1
    vigilus's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Aikido in a BJJ class

    This is geared more towards aikido students so my POV is going to reflect it but whatever.

    I just finished a class on BJJ and I gotta admit it was pretty awesome.
    (This was the first time doing this stuff for many of the guys and girls there too though some do have various amounts of training)

    Doing randori in Aikido for 5 minutes is more physically challanging than a lot of people wanna give it credit for. You DO work up quite a sweat.
    That said rolling around on the ground for 20 minutes was exausting. Felt like I was going to puke when I was done.
    We sparred for 2 minutes, took a 15 second break while we changed partners. Did that 3 times more. We then took a 2 minute break and started over again though it was about 30 - 45 seconds between partner swapping.

    I was really surprised at how fast everyone got tired out. We started kneeling facing each other. There wasn't any standup stuff for this class or striking. Towards the end people were just falling into each other.

    We were learning the full guard, half guard, front(?) mount, side mount, some other things and different pins.

    From the kneeling position ten-shinage (sp?) worked surprisingly well. When someone grabbed my wrists or armsI found I was abl to tak their balance quite easily. I even grabbed someone elses wrists and managed to pull it off. I was surprised at some of the other aikido techniques that I managed to use with good results while wrestling.
    Shino-nage worked really well for locking peoples arms behind their head. I was able to do sankajo a few times while on my side twisting up buddies arm. A few wrist locks worked a few times but all in all pretty difficult I found to do while on the ground.

    In aikido you (apparently) hear strength isn't important. And ya if someone is amazing at aikido I can see strength for the most part not being nessary to complete a technique but I think for the most part, strength is important in all things. (Mind you I'm only a green belt and I know next to **** all about aikido).

    I was really surprised at how well I did. I owe that more to play wrestling growing up and wresling with guys after work a la fight club infront of the barracks, and upper body strength.
    In a lot of cases it was pretty easy to just power my way out of locks. I'm not very tall so I don't have a lot of reach but I'm 191lbs ish so I have weight on my side. When someone is trying to do something to you that you don't want them to do, and you can pick them right up off the matt and put them on their head it makes a world of difference

    I found. While you may be able to practice aikido without strength if **** happens and your on the ground with someone strength is going to make or break you IMO.

    I know someone can be very strong and if the other person has great technique then they may have the advantage- either way strength is important.
    Where I found aikido helped was being comfortable with using different parts of my body to make contact with someone and put them where I want (ie shoulder, chest, sides, hips) and being aware of my balance.

    Balance felt like such a huge factor, even when someone had the drop on me if I fucked around with my balance it was almost like I could feel theirs then turn the tables.

    I'm into martial arts for self defense and physical fitness. I have zero interest in competing or UFC. To each their own. UFC nutbars may have left a bad taste in your mouth but if you're even remotely interested in BJJ try it out. I had a blast.

    In my very unprofessional opinion it seems like a really good compliment to aikido especially when you end up on the ground.
    Last edited by vigilus; 1/09/2008 2:36pm at .
    You are not free whose liberty is won by the rigour of other, more righteous souls. Your are merely protected. Your freedom is parasitic, you suck the honourable man dry and offer nothing in return. You who have enjoyed freedom, who have done nothing to earn it

  2. #2

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by GuiltySpark
    This is geared more towards aikido students so my POV is going to reflect it but whatever.

    I just finished a class on BJJ and I gotta admit it was pretty awesome.
    (This was the first time doing this stuff for many of the guys and girls there too though some do have various amounts of training)

    Doing randori in Aikido for 5 minutes is more physically challanging than a lot of people wanna give it credit for. You DO work up quite a sweat.
    That said rolling around on the ground for 20 minutes was exausting. Felt like I was going to puke when I was done.
    We sparred for 2 minutes, took a 15 second break while we changed partners. Did that 3 times more. We then took a 2 minute break and started over again though it was about 30 - 45 seconds between partner swapping.

    I was really surprised at how fast everyone got tired out. We started kneeling facing each other. There wasn't any standup stuff for this class or striking. Towards the end people were just falling into each other.

    We were learning the full guard, half guard, front(?) mount, side mount, some other things and different pins.

    From the kneeling position ten-shinage (sp?) worked surprisingly well. When someone grabbed my wrists or armsI found I was abl to tak their balance quite easily. I even grabbed someone elses wrists and managed to pull it off. I was surprised at some of the other aikido techniques that I managed to use with good results while wrestling.
    Shino-nage worked really well for locking peoples arms behind their head. I was able to do sankajo a few times while on my side twisting up buddies arm. A few wrist locks worked a few times but all in all pretty difficult I found to do while on the ground.

    In aikido you (apparently) hear strength isn't important. And ya if someone is amazing at aikido I can see strength for the most part not being nessary to complete a technique but I think for the most part, strength is important in all things. (Mind you I'm only a green belt and I know next to **** all about aikido).

    I was really surprised at how well I did. I owe that more to play wrestling growing up and wresling with guys after work a la fight club infront of the barracks, and upper body strength.
    In a lot of cases it was pretty easy to just power my way out of locks. I'm not very tall so I don't have a lot of reach but I'm 191lbs ish so I have weight on my side. When someone is trying to do something to you that you don't want them to do, and you can pick them right up off the matt and put them on their head it makes a world of difference I found. While you may be able to practice aikido without strength if **** happens and your on the ground with someone strength is going to make or break you IMO.

    I know someone can be very strong and if the other person has great technique then they may have the advantage- either way strength is important. Where I found aikido helped was being comfortable with using different parts of my body to make contact with someone and put them where I want (ie shoulder, chest, sides, hips) and being aware of my balance.
    Balance felt like such a huge factor, even when someone had the drop on me if I fucked around with my balance it was almost like I could feel theirs then turn the tables.

    I'm into martial arts for self defense and physical fitness. I have zero interest in competing or UFC. To each their own. UFC nutbars may have left a bad taste in your mouth but if you're even remotely interested in BJJ try it out. I had a blast. In my very unprofessional opinion it seems like a really good compliment to aikido especially when you end up on the ground.
    Sounds good! Now if only all Aikidoka would realize the value in crosstraining. See my post in another thread for stuff I've done while rolling.

    http://www.bullshido.net/forums/show...&postcount=103

  3. #3
    Virus's Avatar
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    Aug 2005
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    So when do you quit aikido?

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Indiana
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    2-6 months
    "a martial art that has no rules is nothing but violence" - Kenji Tomiki

  5. #5
    money's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by GuiltySpark
    I found. While you may be able to practice aikido without strength if **** happens and your on the ground with someone strength is going to make or break you IMO.
    You should read this thread
    :Determined:
    HTFU and join Bullshido on Fitocracy!
    http://ftcy.co/tBAxyj

  6. #6

    Join Date
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    Toronto
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I remember my first BJJ class while doing Aikido. Left Aikido later on that week.

  7. #7
    The Question's Avatar
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    5,593
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by GuiltySpark
    In my very unprofessional opinion it seems like a really good compliment to aikido especially when you end up on the ground.
    Wow. Props for the biggest insult ever delivered over the internet.

  8. #8
    leere_form's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i still think about aikido techniques to help me visualize/understand judo/bjj techniques, if that makes you feel any better.

    and i use nikkyo as my most effective and universal grip break.

    aikido's not entirely useless when it comes to teaching you about balance and body mechanics, but as you've discovered, superior grappling and strength will usually come out on top in a scrap.

    one thing aikido taught me that i use to this day in judo is the idea of leading someone out of their sphere of power. if you can get someone to chase you every so slightly out of their own space, you have a chance to throw them. and by doing lots and lots of randori, you'll take advantage of that chance more often.

    that said.. i learned that it was possible in aikido, although i sure as hell didn't learn how to do it for real. :P

  9. #9

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Not another Aikido hate fest thread!

  10. #10

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by leere_form
    i still think about aikido techniques to help me visualize/understand judo/bjj techniques, if that makes you feel any better.

    and i use nikkyo as my most effective and universal grip break.

    aikido's not entirely useless when it comes to teaching you about balance and body mechanics, but as you've discovered, superior grappling and strength will usually come out on top in a scrap.

    one thing aikido taught me that i use to this day in judo is the idea of leading someone out of their sphere of power. if you can get someone to chase you every so slightly out of their own space, you have a chance to throw them. and by doing lots and lots of randori, you'll take advantage of that chance more often.

    that said.. i learned that it was possible in aikido, although i sure as hell didn't learn how to do it for real. :P
    This has improved my Judo as well. It works much better than trying to force technique.

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