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  1. blisterstarr is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/27/2007 10:51am


     Style: Catch as Catch Can

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Taking Impact? Hard or Soft?

    :XXcompute
    I have recently developed a gear lock up in my MA training. Maybe those with more experience can help me. The Question is; to tighten muscles when you get hit by the impact of a strike or not. I as of now don't tense, but more less set up my body for stability so i don't get knocked down or stay loose as possible (except for checking kicks, because in my experience checking a kick with a lose calf hurts like ****). Why, because i was told it was like a drunk driver surviving a crash, to all way stay loose. No I dont remember who told me that.

    My friend who does Kung Fu doesn't seem to tense when hit. I guess you could say he takes it like water and my friends who does tang so doo (hope thats spelled right) do. I guess you could say he take the strike like a wall. Ether way they both kinda seem to make sense to me.

    I do know this; my tang so doo buddies come out or our 60 - 80% sparing matches with much more injures than the rest of us. Is it their blocking? Ridged-ness of their Korean Karate? Or is it their bodies?

    I haven't got to talk to my Muay Thai coach about it to get his opinion on it yet, but he has never mentions tensing your muscles on impact. I have how ever watched Muay Thai instructional tapes talking about getting some ones weight on their front leg and smashing their thigh with a round kick to cause them great pain because there muscles are tense. Ive also seen instructional videos for MMA(like thats a style lol) training that say you want to put your weight on your front leg when getting kicked because it dont hurt as bad.

    Bas Rutten (one of my heroes). Talks about tensing to take blows, but when he talks about ground fighting he mentions getting people to tense up to send blood flow to their muscles and tire them out. Wouldn't that apply to standing combat as well?:angry2: Fedor Emelianenko (hero as well) as far as i can tell doesn't seem to tense up when fighting ether?

    I know science has to back one way or the other. And im sure different styles practice different teachings. It seems so far that my no/barely tensing seems to work best. But am i tensing more than i think i am? I guess ill have to play around with that one next time i spar. I do know that staying loose with my ground game has nearly stopped injuries for me though.

    So this may seem dumb or obvious to some of you, but i would appreciate the your opinion or any facts on the subject you can throw at me. So water or stone wall which is it?
  2. cyril is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/27/2007 11:56am


     Style: No-Gi BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It's important to know how to take a hit, that's for sure, and as little experience I have, I've learned that tensing and taking the blow is better than flowing with it. There is a certain science that goes with taking blows that you move with it some, and I know boxers practice this to protect against head blows.

    Maybe you should check Omega's blocking with the Face videos. They'll give you a good idea of how to take blows, but remember, you do different things for different situations.

    I'd say for the body, take the blow, for the head, try go with it when it happens.
  3. AlienGunfighter is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/27/2007 12:50pm


     Style: Krav Maga (4), BJJ white

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Like old people with bowel and bladder problems, it depends. Staying tense will definitely wear you out quicker, whether on your feet or on the ground ("relaxing" was one of the first things I had to correct about myself when I started). However, taking leg kicks on the thigh or gut punches while "loose" will definitely ruin your day.

    In general, I'd venture to say that for a direct impact that you can't avoid (to the arms, legs, and core), tensing while moving into the blow is better. However, I've sparred with people who prefer to roll with it rather than tense up (as you noted about Fedor), so I guess it's all about personal preference and how well they react to getting hit. I've noticed that most people who roll with strikes tend to back up or let themselves get shoved around, which is bad juju. It puts them back on their heels and on the defensive, which turns their world to **** when their opponent uses his momentum to drop bombs while they are backing up.

    My opinion is that you have to balance the wall of stone and the wall of water, leaning more towards the wall of stone. How do you know when to do which? Well, that's the trick of fighting, isn't it?
  4. Torakaka is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/27/2007 1:54pm

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     Style: Kitty Pow Pow!!!

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by cyril

    ... for the head, try go with it when it happens.
    This is a fantastic way to get yourself knocked out imo.

    If you're going to take a hit you want to take it head on, preferably on the forehead. You want to use your neck muscles to keep your head from getting knocked back or twisted around too dramatically.

    That is, if you're GOING to get hit. Of course it's a good idea to stay loose while you're fighting so you don't have to fight your muscles to move, but tensing for a hit is the best way to keep yourself from getting knocked around, thus getting set up for a good shot on a vital area.
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm
  5. cyril is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/27/2007 5:25pm


     Style: No-Gi BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Vincent Blackshadow
    This is a fantastic way to get yourself knocked out imo.

    If you're going to take a hit you want to take it head on, preferably on the forehead. You want to use your neck muscles to keep your head from getting knocked back or twisted around too dramatically.

    That is, if you're GOING to get hit. Of course it's a good idea to stay loose while you're fighting so you don't have to fight your muscles to move, but tensing for a hit is the best way to keep yourself from getting knocked around, thus getting set up for a good shot on a vital area.
    From my experiences, it's primarily important to get out of the intended point of contact. Usually, a good puncher punches THROUGH (aiming though your face, I've heard estimates such as two inches below the surface, for example) his target, and in most cases, I would agree that you need to know how to step into a punch, which is what Omega's little youtube video was about.

    In some cases, if you already have a backwards momentum (which is less preferrable to a lateral one, obviously) I would think it would be better to move out of range, or at least as much as possible, rather than stop, reverse directions, and step into the punch, and take it behind it's "sweet spot". Again, you have more experience with these things, but this has worked for me, but again, I do TKD and work with marshmellows for training, so it's not the best advice, methinks.
  6. Jeice is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/27/2007 6:14pm


     Style: Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Different strokes really. The upside to the hard method (like in Uechi-ryu for example) is that if you get hit by someone that isn't strong enough to break you out of it you're in a very good position to counter. The downside is that if you do it to the wrong person, you're standing in the pocket and probably going down hard. If you want to see a good example of "the softer stuff" the video Russian Strikes has some good examples, yes its systema and by inquisitorial order BS hates systema, but it has some interesting **** so suck my ass.
  7. Torakaka is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/27/2007 8:42pm

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     Style: Kitty Pow Pow!!!

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by cyril
    F

    In some cases, if you already have a backwards momentum (which is less preferrable to a lateral one, obviously) I would think it would be better to move out of range, or at least as much as possible, rather than stop, reverse directions, and step into the punch, and take it behind it's "sweet spot".
    If you're moving back already, you've fucked up in the first place. It's of course an easy way to avoid getting hit when you're sparring in a big open area like the mat in your dojo where you've got plenty of room to run away, but this is a shitty way to fight.

    If you're, say, in an enclosed space like a boxing ring, moving back is merely going to give your opponent room to utilize the full extension of their attacks. Also you have to keep in mind that a good striker is going to be throwing combination attacks, and attempting to back up in response to a strike is often going to set you up for the next one.

    Also, you don't want to be reacting defensively to every strike. This is going to give an experienced fighter something to look for when they try to figure out how to make you react the way they want in order to set up good shots. You need to be thinking about more than whatever strike is coming your way, but a more overall strategy to keep yourself from having to be on the defensive.
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm
  8. Torakaka is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/27/2007 8:44pm

    supporting member
     Style: Kitty Pow Pow!!!

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeice
    If you want to see a good example of "the softer stuff" the video Russian Strikes has some good examples, yes its systema and by inquisitorial order BS hates systema, but it has some interesting **** so suck my ass.

    ^^Ignore anything this guy has to say about anything^^
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm
  9. asimpson2006 is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/28/2007 10:27am


     Style: Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ditto what most of the people said already. If you are about to take a blow, then tense up, but other wise relax. Think of it like you trying to float in water. If you stay relax you will have a better chance of staying above water, then if you tense up, in which you will most likely go under water.

    When I fight I tend to stay relaxed and when I know I can't get out of the way or block a technique, I tense my muscles to cushion the blow.
  10. Jeice is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/29/2007 3:21am


     Style: Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Vincent Blackshadow
    ^^Ignore anything this guy has to say about anything^^
    Hurray for invalidation!!!
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