1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Shobayashi Shorin-Ryu

    Has anyone ever heard of this? Is it a good art? I found a school that's pretty close to my house that teaches this. Here's the site: http://www.tackarate.com/

  2. #2
    TKDBot
    Guest
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Welcome to Bullshido, the best Martial Arts forum on the entire Internet, Marx. Seriously, you won't regret your choice to join us. We're a great bunch of folks, except for Hannibal. And Sirc. And TaiGip. And MMA Kid. And... well, you get the point.

  3. #3
    Odacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    3,632
    Style
    Bits and pieces
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Looks like a point contact crowd. If thats what you're looking for, then it's a good place. The head instructor, Shihan Larry C. Tankson is a world champion and has a ton of other achievements according to that site.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    305
    Style
    Karate / Judo Noob
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Shobayashi, like nearly all styles of karate, is going to be hit or miss in the way of practical application. Taking a look at the website, I saw a number of concerns that raised a flag for me. I started to make a list, but I found myself compiling a decent sized list.

    I can't say it's a McDojo as I couldn't find anything stating rank requirements, fees, etc., but it certainly looks like it could possibly be (Karate Day Camp, Little Tigers Program, a long list of kata, lack of lineage listed, heavy tournament focus, etc). Or it could just be a tournament heavy facility that does teach practical self defense on the side - in the form of jui-jitsu (whether Japanese or Brazilian isn't listed, despite the head instructor claiming to have studied in both).


    Your best bet is to go there, watch a class, speak with an instructor as well as maybe a student or parents of a student (or two) for their input, and make a decision based on that.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2
    Style
    Shobayashi Shorin Ryu
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I know it's been awhile since this was posted, but thought someone else might stumble upon this with a similar question. I've studied Shobayashi Shorin Ryu for 11 years now, and I have to say it really depends on were you go, and more importantly, how traditional the instructors are. Some dojo's butcher the art, and "condense" or cut out "unnecessary" aspects - reflecting a poor understanding of the art as a whole, its complexities, and . Traditionally, it has VERY little in the "open sparring" realm of things, since you train yourself primarily to do "one technique kill/disable" types of counterattacks, and very little in the realm of first strikes. The depth of the art can be extensive, if you understand the many forms it teaches, and it is often taught in conjunction with Shudokan Karate in the US. It has several hundred years of background through training and life of death application against everyone from the japanese samurai and mobs of whalers (both groups regularly tried to storm Shori Castle, the art's name sake) to various chinese traders, ambassadors, and military men who visited the ports of Okinawa, to, of course, many self-defense situations on the street. It has the greatest breadth of techniques I have ever seen in one art, including everything from basic self-defense, in-fighting techniques, weapons techniques, and even joint locking, throwing, and ground-work techniques and applications (hence the seemingly inordinate number of forms). I find that our white belts know more about basic body mechnics then many "black belts" I have met, and our 1st dan often takes 8+ years to achieve (granted, this marks progress in both Shorin and Shudokan styles simultaneously, ie you are earning two black belts). I personally have sparred against many styles of karate practioners, ground fighters, others, and found my understanding and execution of techniques to be far more refined, and I am usually able to deal with trained opponents 30 or sometimes even 50 lbs. larger than myself. But again, much of this might be more a reflection on the specific dojo I train at and personal skill then the styles themselves. For example, most karateka's don't understand the aspects of their art that can help them defend against a BJJ practitioner - of which there are many. A complete system will understand the mechanical and structural weaknesses and strengths of the human body - which don't change whether you are standing up or lying down. I'll give you a good test - ask the instructor one question: what makes a front stance so important if it is so rarely used in combat? For any style of karate, their answer should have two parts - 1.) that it teaches the basics developing power by driving off the ground (instead of simply falling into an opponent) and 2.) if one can not master all the aspects of deriving power from a well grounded stance, one can not master all the sources of power available when in a more mobile, upright fighting stance.

    I hope this helps.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Edinburgh/Aberdeen
    Posts
    234
    Style
    Boxing, Rowing Fu
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Wow this place looks killer.

    -Creative and musical forms

    -Old granny's aerobics class disguised as "KardioKick"

    -Opportunities for horse riding? wtf!?

    Avoid this place at all costs. If you see anyone come out of it, burn their dressing gown/gi.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    frozen midwest.
    Posts
    99
    Style
    jujitsu/finger boxing.
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    welcome to the boards.well looked at the webpage.seems like a nice guy.but it reminds me of all the national karate/ata type stuff out their.but on the other hand if the instructions legit and suits you.go for it.cheers.

  8. #8
    CharlieWoopAss2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Buffalo,NY
    Posts
    501
    Style
    Isshin-Ryu Karate,JKD
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Welcome to douchebagIsland, TKDbot.... wait what? oh I'm sorry i meant bullshido. Well I never heard of this style,but like bea rich said it's either a hit or miss style.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Edinburgh/Aberdeen
    Posts
    234
    Style
    Boxing, Rowing Fu
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In the hit-or-miss stakes, this place is definitely 'miss'. As in give it one. A miss that is. In fact, they don't seem to 'hit' much (pads, each other) at all.

    Stu xD

  10. #10

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    30
    Style
    none yet
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    On Shorin Ryu

    I have to agree with the above post. When it comes to the traditional okinawan styles, you really have to be sure about the sensei in question. Shorin-Ryu is a style where the details are everything, and practiced with patience and dedication, and learned correctly, it is a very effective style. Most traditional instructors tend to shy away from the sport aspects, and often you won't see much sparring going on. It's just how the style is taught. Honestly, outside of fitness, you probably won't be able to apply it practically for months, if not over a year. It has to do with how precise the mechanics behind the techniques are. However, after a couple of years, it is a very formidable style. If the instructor is good, and you have the patience for it, its great. However, if you like something mroe readily practical or with more sparring aspects, there are plenty of styles more suited to that.

    So, there are my 2 pennies. Hope it helps some.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in