Page 1 of 7 12345 ... Last
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    808
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Jian - Where to learn it?Is there a chinese sword fighting art like kendo/kenjutsu?

    Ever since I saw the wonderfully choreographed sequence between Jet Li and Anthony Delongis in Fearless, I've been interested in the form of the chinese straightsword or jian.

    I have two in my poesession. One is a WuShu forms Hsu Jian from Paul Chen.
    and

    one is a hand forged/folded Carp Jian from Eastwind Knives & Sword that is a dead accurate replica of a authentic period sword used for actual combat. (I like having one real authentic sword from each culture/nation). Point of Balance, Weight, etc is all legit.

    So I've had it sitting pretty for awhile now.
    I'm primarily a FMA practitioner so while stick techs would work with butterfly knives.
    I don't think my skill-set carries over as well with the jian/gim.

    Im here to ask you expert CMA practitioners which art/style would give me a good idea (at the very least the basic form of usage of the Jian.) if not actual practical usage of how to use it.

    I figure Tai chi would be one place.. but I'm not sure how many of those schools actually still teach the sword form.

    It doesn't seem like I could fence with it as well or as fast as the ribbon like wushu blade Jet Li had. my legit jian has a pretty solid blade. (as most non-decorative jian did according to swordforums)

    but from what I understand its a point and cut sword similar to the many european "fencing" type swords.

    Educate me please.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,471
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What is your location? With that info several people here may be able to point you in the direction of an instructor in your area.

  3. #3
    Rivington's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    East Bay, CA
    Posts
    4,803
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yeah, taiji would be it, though they might also want you to pick up a solo hand form or two first. Where are you?

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    808
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm in the Dallas Fort Worth Metroplex un Texas.
    I apologize I should have stated this earlier.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    No where near
    Posts
    567
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    SD teaches tia chi sword, and I'm sure there's a school around there somewhere.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,437
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Gim (jian) sets are pretty common. I'm working on one from Choi li Fut right now (or was until my recent injury). Tai Chi sets are the most common and not hard to pick up. I've been playing with the gim on and off for maybe a year now, so I'm just beginning.

    I've found that some of my fencing experience translates into application, but there's some more dynamic cutting. The applications I've learned generally start with cutting the arm and moving in.

    Lots of sets have the "gim hand": a two finger hand position that you place near your wrist. This was explained to me as a way to keep your hand from waving around where somebody can cut it.

  7. #7
    Putting the "ow" back in "flowery technique"
    NJM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,681
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Isn't the gim a longer, heavier straightsword?

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    808
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NJM
    Isn't the gim a longer, heavier straightsword?
    I thought the terms

    gim/jian - chinese
    geom - korean
    kiem - vietnamese

    were relatively interchangeable
    generally meant a straightsword of some sort.

    The straight swords varied in length and weight depending on the era they were made
    and their purpose. (decorative/display/ceromonial, forms or actual use)

    and I think there are one or two shaolin-do schools around here. Do you think I could just learn the sword form by itself from them or would they make me go through their system? or is that something Id have to ask the instructors themselves.

    I'm pretty much just interested in the sword forms as I already have a MT and FMA striking base.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,437
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If you just want the form, get a video. The movements for the basic Yang set are not too complicated. My teacher does workshops on basic movements that go like this:

    1) Getting the figure-8 ish motion down and explaining how it works.
    2) Parrying. (This is where my fencing was especially helpful, because the parries can use a beat or pris de fer feeling and I could catch it on the bottom third.)
    3) Practicing the cuts on a target (usually, a partner who's kind enough to let you pretend to cut them up a bit).
    4) Introducing a movement or two from a form and working applications.

    I personally think the Tai Chi set's a bit staid. I learned most of it, but I switched to Choi li Fut for a bit more variety. Some sets use the weapon in surprising ways; I learned a close range whipping cut from a set called Moi Fa Gim that was quite a bit of fun and, if style's your thing, pretty fancy looking.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,437
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NJM
    Isn't the gim a longer, heavier straightsword?
    No. Same weapon, same written characters: 劍 or 剑.

Page 1 of 7 12345 ... Last

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO