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  1. Ronin is offline

    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    10/27/2003 1:40pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Shi Ja Quan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Indeed, Tyson HAD the rare gift of superior hand speed and also of having a gifted teacher , Cus D'amato, that taught him how to put his body behind his punchs.
    Interesting that as he got heavier his punching power decreased.
  2. Nid is offline

    Light Heavyweight

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    Posted On:
    10/27/2003 1:47pm

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well, maybe it did, maybe it didn't. With something like that, it's a helluva lot more important to reach the target quickly, rather than producing the equivolent force with a heavier "hand". Trading off acceleration for mass certainly wouldn't be desirable in that context. Can't exactly hurt the guy if you can't connect in the first place.
  3. Ronin is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/27/2003 1:53pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Shi Ja Quan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If you see his workouts when he was under 230 and compare to when he is over, the differences are amazing, especially in the bag work.
    The addition of the extra weight, hurt his speed.
    When he fought Lewis he was almost the same weight and Lewis is like 6" taller !!!
    He was so slow, his punches were nothing compared to what they were before.
  4. FingerorMoon? is offline

    The man they call FoM

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    Posted On:
    10/27/2003 7:09pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Matt Brzycki writes some good stuff.

    I've read this article before, and I'll repeat the same thing I thought when I read it the first time:

    I didn't think anyone looked to 'eastern bloc' countries for speed training secrets. As he points out, that is never where they dominated. It was (and is in some cases) strength related events that they dominated.

    Saying that, yoiu've got to remember the distinction between improving and realising your potential.
    You probably can't improve what your genetic limits place on you, but not many people (not saying I have...) have realised the full potential of what you can accomplish speed wise.

    As the article points out, unless your doing sports specific speed training, you probably have no idea how fast you could be.
    The Wastrel - So attractive he HAS to be a woman.
    - Pizdoff
  5. Ronin is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/28/2003 8:17am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Shi Ja Quan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The point of the article was that, EVEN with all these new methods, these advances and scientific aplications of this and that, the actuall difference in speed was MINIMAL.
    The article points out that genetics play a VERY important role, if not the MOST important.
    Reread the article ,see the the record in the beginning and see it at the end, see the VERy little difference?
    Athletes now are ON steroids, they weight train, they do the lates and most sceintifc methods and yet...
    You would think the difference would be more.
  6. Ronin is offline

    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    10/28/2003 11:38am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Shi Ja Quan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Speed is one of the hardest things to develop.
    If you look at world records for strength or endurance, you see a sizeable difference form the records of say 50 years to the ones now, but speed, it's so Fractional, is amazing.
    Genetics are more important in anthing to do with speed than in anyhting else, because, even with drugs, the variance is really not that much, but strength for example, the difference in strength between a steroid takes and a non steroid takes can be extraordinary.
  7. tangshou is offline

    Registered Member

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    Shanghai
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    Posted On:
    10/31/2003 1:04am


     Style: Gongfu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Does anyone know WHY speed is so hard to improve? Is it because muscles fibers have a limit to how fast they can move, and adding more muscle adds more mass?

    When you train speed, what exactly are you training? Muscles? Brain? Brain-muscle connection? Probably all of the above.

    I sometimes feel my body doesn't move as fast as it could, possibly a habit to protect tissues/joints from uncontrolled motion?
  8. Ronin is offline

    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    10/31/2003 11:58am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Shi Ja Quan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Genetice plays a VERY important role in developing speed.
    The strength to weight ratio is a factor.
    Technique, of course.
    You have to realise, its not about hand speed but total body speed, you want to put your whole body behind a strike, not just your arm, so you need to mover your WHOLE body very fast, not easy.
    It more overcoming inertia than anything else, you will notice that you hit faster in the last or secong last punch in a combination than you do the first, the reason is that, the first punch needed to overcome the inertia ( dead weight) to get the combination going.
    That is were strength comes in, stong mucles overcome inertia better and faster than weak muscles.
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