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  1. Whosthemaster is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2007 1:33pm


     Style: FMA BJJ Blue

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Injuries in FMA

    Sticks hurt. How does your FMA school tries to prevent injuries when training? What kind of injuries have you sustained despite those measures?

    When my school started, they used to train using the ordinary rattans and no (or minimum) protection. Our teacher has broken several fingers due to this habit. A few years back, in order to reduce the costs, he began using hard plastic sticks instead of rattans, being cheaper to buy and lasting longer. When fighting, his students would only use the hollow sticks and gloves, but still some injuries are made, specially while training common drills like tapi-tapi with the solid stick.
    Nowadays, after trying with different kinds of paddings for the sticks, we use the hollow one completely wrapped with a light rubber used to isolate heat in pipes and covered with duct tape for fights, and solid for common training. When in tournaments, we also use head protection and gloves, but in casual sparring just a cap in the head.
    During one of those tournaments, helmets used in WEKAF were also tried, but they were destroyed fairly quickly.
    We don't use any kind of body protection other than those. The padded stick hurts, but seldom causes anything serious, just a red mark and an angry colleague. During one occasion, I was struck in the head dangerously close to the eye, but it was more of a scare other than a real injury. I've actually been more hurt training punches in the sandbag than in stick fighting.
    But, in one of those tournaments, one guy got a pretty serious blow to the head and fractured his skull. He didn't need cirurgy nor had any complication thereafter, but was out of the fight farly early, hearing bells like in a cartoon. He was wearing the head protector, but his opponent hit with not with the stick, but with a descending elbow strike when he was already in the ground (a semi-legal move, btw).
    Last edited by Whosthemaster; 11/20/2007 1:38pm at .
  2. Whosthemaster is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2007 1:49pm


     Style: FMA BJJ Blue

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh yes, this Dog Brothers video shows very well the power of the stick! lolhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blAZAe0kMYo
  3. Neildo is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/20/2007 1:55pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: FBSD

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I just assumed having gnarled, broken hands was part of the FMA training regimen.
    :new_all_c
  4. The Wanderer Ev is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2007 2:00pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Kali Silat

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yes... Yes... I remember the times of battle in the beggining of my training here with the Kali group in Brazil. They where days of glory! Days of endless pain and suffering... Now, they are less violent but equally gratifying. In the beggining the sticks where hard and light, there was no protection whatsoever and we would punish each other till one of us would desist or the time was up. Now this has changed, the Age of Conan has ended...

    Now seriosly, why are americans so afraid of getting hurt in martial arts training?
  5. Ryno is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2007 2:02pm


     Style: FMA, Jujutsu/Judo/SAMBO

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If we are just drilling hard, live stick with lacrosse or street hockey gloves. For light sparring, light live sticks, gloves, helmet, elbow/knee protection possibly. For full contact sparring, rattan-core padded sticks, gloves, helmet, elbow/knee, optional body padding. Our club tends to be very aggressive with power striking, so even though I generally prefer live stick, people just get very dinged up after a few sessions, hence the padded stick if we are going all-out. I did one time break my hand with quality lacrosse gloves and live stick.

    As far as helmets go, the WEKAF ones suck, imo. The cage is great, but getting hit in the ear really sucks, and the things just won't stay mounted properly and spin on me. We check and punch to the face while sparring, and WEKAF helmets just swivel. So, I now go with a customized lacrosse helmet, with extra bars welded on to the mask. It offers much better protection, and breathes much better.

  6. Neildo is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/20/2007 2:02pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: FBSD

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by The Wanderer Ev
    Now seriosly, why are americans so afraid of getting hurt in martial arts training?
    legal liability.


    Ryno - damn dude that helmet is fucking badass. i gotta score me one of those babies.
    Last edited by Neildo; 11/20/2007 2:06pm at .
    :new_all_c
  7. Whosthemaster is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2007 2:05pm


     Style: FMA BJJ Blue

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Neildo
    legal liability.
    Damn pussys! lol
  8. Ryno is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2007 2:13pm


     Style: FMA, Jujutsu/Judo/SAMBO

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by The Wanderer Ev
    Yes... Yes... I remember the times of battle in the beggining of my training here with the Kali group in Brazil. They where days of glory! Days of endless pain and suffering... Now, they are less violent but equally gratifying. In the beggining the sticks where hard and light, there was no protection whatsoever and we would punish each other till one of us would desist or the time was up. Now this has changed, the Age of Conan has ended...

    Now seriosly, why are americans so afraid of getting hurt in martial arts training?
    Because when you are injured, it is difficult to continue training. Pain tolerance is a good attribute to have as a fighter, but multiple injuries can ruin your opportunity for training.

    I've broken my hand, dislocated a knee, torn my mcl and acl, broken ribs, torn knee cartliage, had numerous cuts, lost many fingernails, sprained ankles and toes, and broken my back when training. I'm american. Do you actually think I'm afraid of pain? But did any of these injuries help my training?

    When someone blasts me in the hands and I don't have gloves on, I may end up with a broken hand and may not be able to work my normal computer job. When someone blasts me with gloves on, it can still hurt, yet I can continue sparring, training, and going to work. Was my opponent's technique any worse if I had worn gloves? Would my training be better or worse if I had a broken hand?

    I mean, I'm not a dumbass. If my opponent blasts my gloved hand, I'm intelligent enough to know that the strike would have done damage without gloves. I realize that this is a mistake on my part, and will try not to make the same mistake again. But what if my hand was broken? Sure, I might tough it out, and continue (I did this in the tournament where I broke my hand, and won the fight). But the next day, my hand will be in a cast, and I will be unable to train with that hand. How does this make me a better fighter?
  9. Ryno is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2007 2:19pm


     Style: FMA, Jujutsu/Judo/SAMBO

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Neildo
    Ryno - damn dude that helmet is fucking badass. i gotta score me one of those babies.
    Thank you. That black portion on the bottom is a goalie neck guard, and swivels down and sits on your upper chest protecting the front of your throat. It works great.

    It's a Cascade CPX. Bit pricey, but if you spar a lot and like keeping your head intact, it's a good investment.
  10. Whosthemaster is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2007 2:25pm


     Style: FMA BJJ Blue

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryno
    Because when you are injured, it is difficult to continue training. Pain tolerance is a good attribute to have as a fighter, but multiple injuries can ruin your opportunity for training.
    Ryno, nobody is saying that protection and care should be neglected. But here he hear many stories about schools that just don't train properly in order to avoid any possibility of being hurt, therefore making the students attenting worse martial artists.

    The other day I acidently hit a training partner in the eye with my thumb while training defenses against takedowns. He understood that it was an accident, I apologized (many times actually, it scared me), he rested a while and after that it was everything okay. What the Wanderes was refering is that, for what he hear about MA schools there, he could have tought I was trying to actually harm him and sued me and our school. So, in order to avoid that, our teacher wouldn't allow us to train realisticly.

    By the way, the helmet is quite cool!
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