I seem to remember a few months (years?) back the mention of a “corner drill”. I have some time now to post, so I thought I would give my take on this drill, as I think it can be a valuable drill to have rotated into any strikers training routine. Sorry if this has been done before, but I didn’t catch anything on an albeit brief search. So here it goes.

Working in a ring is ideal for this, but not necessary. The drill takes place in a corner (shocker), so if you don’t have a ring, you can use a wall, and make a corner with Thai pads or whatever is handy. The point is that you have to limit the movement of the person doing the drill. This is most definitely not a footwork drill in its initial stages.

The person doing the drill stands in a boxing stance with their back foot and back shoulder completely in the corner. You want to cut a 45 degree angle with your lead foot, so that your lead shoulder is pointing towards the opposite corner. Don’t stand flush with the corner so that both your shoulders are touching the ropes of either side of the corner. This will limit your body movement and effectively pin you in the corner. While the initial part of this drill isn’t a foot work drill, more advanced variations can add bobbing and weaving out of the corner and trying to reverse your opponent into the corner. For this, you need to ensure that you have room.

So, to start the drill, the pad-holder faces the boxer in a fairly tight positioning. It is a freelance pad hold, however there are set combos that are delivered off of specific feeds. This is the basic outline (described for orthodox boxer):

- Partner holds a “corner” (One mitt held for a hook, the other flat for a cross, forming a 90 degree corner with the mitts) for a standard “Boxing 4-count” (Jab-Cross-Hook-Cross)

- Partner throws a left body hook – Boxer drops in his/her stance a little by bending in the knees and catching the punch with the elbow/arm. When dropping down, don’t drop your hands. They should be stuck to your jaw. Dropping the hand to catch the punch is an invitation to eat a head hook if they double up low and then high. While down, the boxer pops back up with a Right-Upper Cut (RUC), Left Hook (LH), and Right Cross (RC) [for whatever reason, this drill always ends on a cross... you can mix this up if you want]

- Partner throws a right body hook – Boxer drops in his/her stance again and covers. Pops back up with a Left Upper Cut (LUC) and a RC.

- Partner throws a head hook with the left mitt – Boxer does a high cover with their right arm (A high cover should have as much service of the arm on the head as possible – Don’t have your arm way out, as any kind of a power hook will just smash your own arm into your head. Make sure your chin is always tucked!) From the high cover, the boxer returns a LC and a RC

- Partner throws a head hook with the right mitt – Boxer does a high cover with their left arm, and returns a RC-LH-RC.
So these are the basics combos of the drill. Here are some things to keep in mind while doing it.

- Your chin is ALWAYS tucked. Don’t “peak” by popping your chin up.

- When you are doing your high covers, you roll a little with the punch, thus simultaneously taking a bit of the impact of their punch, and loading up your counter punch. So it is very important to realize there is a shifting of weight occurring.

- This is just a drill. To start off, you can throw the combos in sequence, but once you have it down, it is very important to “add life” into it. Mix up the order of the combos, have the pad-holder choose where to hit. You can double up sides, add double hooks (body head) and only cover the first and counter the second, etc.

- As mentioned, this drill can have footwork added, and bobs and weaves. If you are bobbing and weaving the head-hooks, remember to keep your chin down BUT EYES UP! Don’t look at the floor, or you might be staring at the ceiling. Tough to do, but practice.

- If you are B&W the left head hook, you come up RC-LH-RC

- If you are B&W the right head hook, you come up with LH-RC.

- Pad-holder stays tight to the boxer, not giving them much room

- Start slow, and pick up the pace. When the 30 second buzzer goes, giver’ gas!

I hope this is comprehensible, and useful as a tool for your games. If you like the drill, but think pics are necessary, let me know and I’ll see what I can do, time permitting.

I hope this is comprehensible, and useful as a tool for your games. If you like the drill, but think pics are necessary, let me know and I’ll see what I can do, time permitting.