1. #1

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    Jun 2007
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Training as a damn noob

    Hi all,

    just started in my first REAL MA school this week (Monday, in fact - Ancona's gym in New Orleans, if you have heard of it). still trying to unbrainwash myself of my last 4 years of TKD...and having a tough time keeping up with others who actually have some previous experience.

    for example,
    -i subconciously chamber punches and have to consciously force myself not to
    -cannot jumprope whatsoever, but i'm practicing this at home
    -i cannot do the speedbag at the speed that others do it,
    -even doing simple combinations like jab cross hook i have to consciously tell myself to move my feet right and move my upper body and arms properly
    -also to some extent i have to remind myself to keep my arms up high in the right position

    Any tips on how to get a jump on the learning curve? Are these issues typical for newbies or am I way behind (remember, i have no experience previously whatsoever, im not counting TKD because it has done more harm than good)?

    any suggestions accepted. thanks in advance. :XXfridge:

  2. #2
    AK: Giving new meaning to the word "Unfair."
    Airman Kai's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    First thing you should know is: you're at the same place all of us were when we started learning how to ACTUALLY fight. To be honest, you're no further behind than somebody who has NO training.

    Second of all, how old are you, out of curiosity?

    **Advice**
    Sitck with it, man, we all have to train to be any good, ya feel me?




  3. #3
    Keeping you safe from Mongolians

    Join Date
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    Sanda/Taijiquan *Hiatus*
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hey don't dismiss those quick high kicks, I came from a KMA base and I still catch people out with things here and there. In fact what you are gonna learn gives you a great basis for setting up some of the things you are more used to. But don't worry about sucking, everybodies gotta start somewhere.

  4. #4

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by airman kai
    First thing you should know is: you're at the same place all of us were when we started learning how to ACTUALLY fight. To be honest, you're no further behind than somebody who has NO training.

    Second of all, how old are you, out of curiosity?

    **Advice**
    Sitck with it, man, we all have to train to be any good, ya feel me?
    19. dont worry im not gonna quit, im too excited and interested to leave but i dont like....well, sucking at anything that i do.

    i was always really good mentally (look at where I am now), but physical prowess was never emphasized as heavily as the mental...well at least i'm not overweight/obese and in good physical condition (compared to average people, definitely not fighters! lol)


    Quote Originally Posted by seanyseanybean
    Hey don't dismiss those quick high kicks, I came from a KMA base and I still catch people out with things here and there. In fact what you are gonna learn gives you a great basis for setting up some of the things you are more used to. But don't worry about sucking, everybodies gotta start somewhere.
    problem is, KMA kicks were taught to me completely different (read: wrong?) than the kicks i am taught now. although they share some of the few basics they had to correct my technique numerous times my first class. In retrospect, KMA gave me good flexibility and at least a little awareness of martial arts techniques but i think some of things forcefully imprinted in my subconscious during my tenure were pretty harmful (see list above in OP) like wrong stances, for example. my feet are now naturally going to the wrong positions and i have to remind myself to correct.

    anyway, thanks to hear im not doing subpar. im definitely not quitting any time remotely soon. any tips on how to get proficient at things like hitting speed bags and jumpropes?
    Last edited by gurakshun; 11/16/2007 12:04pm at .

  5. #5

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Hang in there...

    I wouldn't worry too much about sucking in the beginning. Everybody does. The truth is, you're always going to suck at something in your art. Some arts require a different level of conditioning than others. Some focus more on different things than others. I think the important thing to do is find 1 art that you like and learn it very well. I know a lot of people who like to jump from art to art, and they ususally get smashed by a really good martial artist who has been practicing 1 style and knows it very well. I've seen a small mantis teacher take out three huge guys at once (and it wasn't an exibition match.) It's just that the mantis guy had been practicing for 30 years and really knew his stuff well, whil,e the other guys had not.

    So hang in there, and I'm glad you found a school you like. Peace.

    A Cool Site For Stun Guns, Taser Guns and Pepper Spray

  6. #6

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hell, I'd worry more about my wrasslin' skills if I were you - at least you have some ideas about the mechanics of striking.

    I've pretty much always had really strong footwork, but I play(ed) a whole bunch of sports from early childhood (including soccer, lacrosse, basketball). I guess just keep at it with the jump rope - that thing can work all kinds of wonders for builing technique.

    Think circular and not linear. Don't walk straight forward or backwards, and I think that if you keep this in mind, keeping your hands high will probably naturally follow.

    Also: you aren't hitting for points, you're hitting for damage. Forget sparring in TKD, just remember the things you've learned that are actually powerful shots - your roundhouse kicks in particular. Throw 'em at the head, the thigh, the liver... you might impress your instructors just a little with some good kicks.

  7. #7

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by conorjs13
    Hell, I'd worry more about my wrasslin' skills if I were you - at least you have some ideas about the mechanics of striking.

    I've pretty much always had really strong footwork, but I play(ed) a whole bunch of sports from early childhood (including soccer, lacrosse, basketball). I guess just keep at it with the jump rope - that thing can work all kinds of wonders for builing technique.

    Think circular and not linear. Don't walk straight forward or backwards, and I think that if you keep this in mind, keeping your hands high will probably naturally follow.

    Also: you aren't hitting for points, you're hitting for damage. Forget sparring in TKD, just remember the things you've learned that are actually powerful shots - your roundhouse kicks in particular. Throw 'em at the head, the thigh, the liver... you might impress your instructors just a little with some good kicks.
    I will be starting the jiujitsu too once the mat room is repaired (shouldn't be too long...). It is a school with a weight room, a boxing/kickboxing room with a ring and a lot of heavy bags, and the upcoming mat room for the MMA/jiujitsu stuff. all within 5 mins of my house, i think i got a pretty good deal.

  8. #8

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm in the same situation, except I did point-scoring kickboxing about 9 years ago ... that's WAY below TKD level. The stance thing is the WORST. It now even seems to use different muscle groups that I've never used before so I fatigue quickly, and because I'm thinking about where my feet are as well I feel so lumbered... footwork exercises ARE helping, though. It's slow progress.

    When I had my first submission wrestling session I felt so lost ... but after 3 weeks it already feels somewhat natural to try a few submissions in combination and escape from an couple of holds. I'm still very much a noob, but I no longer have the whole "Okay, now what do I do?" thoughts, I'm just starting to DO.

    I struggled a lot with fitness, as well, but that's one thing that REALLY surprised me by the rate at which it improved... :D

  9. #9
    WhiteShark's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Actually the real first thing you should know is that this belongs in the newb section.

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