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Thread: Hanmudo

  1. #11

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Blues-man
    Hehe, I made a mistake. That video is not from Han Mu Do, but from Han Moo Do...

    Han Mu Do is the art founded by Dr. He-Young Kimm, and Han Moo Do was founded by a korean guy named Young Suk.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Han_Mu_Do
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Han_Moo_Do

    Here's a demo of Han Mu Do sparring, sadly, not as good as the Han Moo Do video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JoFXiDevSx4

  2. #12
    hpr's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Blues-man
    Hehe, I made a mistake. That video is not from Han Mu Do, but from Han Moo Do...

    Han Mu Do is the art founded by Dr. He-Young Kimm, and Han Moo Do was founded by a korean guy named Young Suk.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Han_Mu_Do
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Han_Moo_Do

    Here's a demo of Han Mu Do sparring, sadly, not as good as the Han Moo Do video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JoFXiDevSx4
    Han Moo Do was at least pretty cool. Sport oriented and Mr. Suk has a boner for good conditioning. Pretty McDojoish grading system & seminars (although I think it takes at least 4 years to get a black belt..) but they train hard, spar and at least a decade ago didn't even bother to pretend know how to grapple.

    I don't think they do Han Moo Do across the pond, though. And don't know **** about Han Mu Do.
    Curiosity killed the cat. But damn it had a blast.

  3. #13

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hi guys
    I was introduced to HanmuDo in the UK
    http://www.chilsong.com
    I tried it for a couple of months, but coming from a MT and JJ background it didn't really float my boat. Not saying it is actually bad though. I did get some BS about it being used by the US Secret Service, but i disregarded that and actualy gave it a shot. They were trying to show throws from a static position, which i thought was weird. All the striking was pretty much standard Korean fare and didn't generate a lot of power.

    I trained direct under the Chief Master blah blah, who was a bit shocked I knew more about their 'secret stuff' than his BB's. Stuff like pressure points into throws then dropping into locks etc. The funny thing was training their way made it easier to do this stuff as the uke/target wasn't moving. Couldnt pull off half that stuff in JJ.

    Anyways, that was my (brief) experience with Hanmudo- not saying dont do it, just it is not for me.

    Peace. Out.

  4. #14

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    hmmm. just watched the hanmudo video.

    The locks and throws are ok, but i take it they are not shown how to counter stuff?

  5. #15

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    In Europe the hanmudo-people are rewarded higher dangrades with the same ease you get a fortune cookie at your local Chinese restaurant.
    Hanmudo is just Dr. Kim He Young's style of hapkido. Not sure where the need came from to name it differently.

    I respect Dr. Kim for the serious research he has done, but don't bother much for what he does technique wise.

  6. #16

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    My own understanding s that the HANMUDO curriculum is not so much "Korean" as it is a composite of material across a number of grappling arts including wrestling, Judo, Aikido, KUK SOOL and SIN MU Hapkido, to name a few. At first glance I can imagine this must really tickle the MMA folks among us since this would seem to go right up their alley. Instead, what it seems to have done---and I note this every time I watch similar clips--- is create dissonance in the practitioner regarding biomechanics.

    May I say, for instance, that the body is used quite differently for material proceeding from an "aiki" background than for a "sport" background (Judo) or a combat background such as yawara. Trying to balance all of these materials together to likewise include striking and kicking and to do so optimally has been the "Holy Grail" of Asian arts since time immemorial. Lot of people claim to have done it. Noone (to my knowlege) has succeeded. I will also state further that it is unlikely that anyone will since there are cases where the use of the body in one activity is diametrically opposed to the biomechanics of another.

    If I have upset the "hwa" of the discussion by striking a particularly serious note, I ask pardon and will return to "lurk" mode. :-)

    Best Wishes,

    Bruce

  7. #17

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    wow bruce, very serious

    i just got the impression that it was very much 'cobbled together' with no real cohesion. I didnt stay long enough to learn any forms but the ones the senior grades were doing looked like they were done because they 'looked pretty' unlike some of the very traditional kata/forms i have seen.

    it was little things like trying to teach a dynamic throw that i would do in jj but with the uke(sorry i dont know the korean term) stood ther holding onto your belt!!! and i have already mentioned about the striking

    but someone is making money out of it. just not mine

  8. #18

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    I have heard a guy who used to be in the Hanmudo Association (had a falling out) say that it is just Hapkido, which is what he teaches now, but I don't have enough experience with HKD (that's what Billy Jack did, right?) to extrapolate.
    And as to the uke grabbing the belt...in my class we were taught all the throws from a sleeve/lapel grip, like the judo guys do it. Maybe it is just a school thing?

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince Tortelli
    I have heard a guy who used to be in the Hanmudo Association (had a falling out) say that it is just Hapkido, which is what he teaches now, but I don't have enough experience with HKD (that's what Billy Jack did, right?) to extrapolate.
    And as to the uke grabbing the belt...in my class we were taught all the throws from a sleeve/lapel grip, like the judo guys do it. Maybe it is just a school thing?
    hmm, rings a bell with the grabs- it has been about 4 years since i tried it, i know i was confused as hell about teh belt grab, but there were probably the other grabs too. i do remember that the uke just grabbed you and stood there, so with me being from a JJ background where i was used to the uke trying to smack your nose to the back of your headit felt really weird. it just meant that you had to generate all the movement for the throw, which isnt that productive.
    Last edited by leec123; 1/12/2008 8:25am at .

  10. #20

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    Hi guys, I train in Han Mu Do, 3 times a week. If you've got any questions please feel free to ask. I've been doing it for nearly 3 years now...

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