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  1. UpaLumpa is offline
    UpaLumpa's Avatar

    Exasperated.

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    Dec 2005
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    Descending into absurdity
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    Posted On:
    11/26/2007 8:35pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by jackrusher
    He re-iterated a general principle of fighting that has served me well, but which I had not applied to guard: defending is losing.
    This is a very good point to reiterate.

    It is also very applicable to me; and likely one of the main things currently keeping me from purple (my instructor heavily weights aggression and initiative during sparring). I am far too comfortable defending and exchanging positions and don't have any real urgency in finishing. Thank you, it is something I've been working on but the reminder is useful.
  2. Ungjaevel is offline
    Ungjaevel's Avatar

    Registered Member

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    Jan 2007
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    Varberg, Sweden
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    Posted On:
    11/28/2007 10:07pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ & Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A while back a purple belt at my school clued me in to lifting my hips as well as pulling down on the head when finishing leg triangles. It blew my mind at the time. "whaa? lift my hips AND pull on the head? what is this black magic you speak of?" In retrospect it should have been the most obvious thing ever. I guess that's what makes me a white belt.
  3. Roidie McDouchebag is offline
    Roidie McDouchebag's Avatar

    Injury Waiting To Happen

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    May 2002
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    Kamloops, BC
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    9,419

    Posted On:
    11/29/2007 12:24am

    supporting member
     Style: Snatch Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Funny how you mention all that and forget breaking posture.
    ALL I KNEW AT THE TIME.
  4. chingythingy is offline

    Senior Member

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    Feb 2006
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    1,166

    Posted On:
    11/29/2007 12:38am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm too dense to have epiphanies.

    However, lately I have been looking at technique from a 15,000 foot level. How does this attack an opponent's base? How does this isolate an appendage for attack? To better position you have to attack an opponent's position with timing - where is he leaning, where is he unbalanced? It's easier to move him that way. And if he has great posture / position, I have to work combos to initiate the unbalance.
  5. RobT is offline

    Registered Member

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    Oct 2004
    Location
    Swansea, Wales
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    454

    Posted On:
    11/29/2007 9:43am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A couple more things I have thought of which propelled me along quickly at times;

    1- When you're watching a technique being demo'd; the end part (the sweep/sub) isn't as important as the beginning. Concentrate on getting the grips and initial body movement's perfect - if you stuff them up during drilling reset and go again, don't just carry on through the technique. Loads of techniques start the same way, so getting the beginning right will be much more beneficial in the long term.

    2- As well as always attacking, you should always be attacking with your arms and legs seperately. Don't use your arms, then stop and use your legs, use everything at the same time. So an example is with them in your guard; with your arms you're attacking grips, with your legs you're trying to work a high guard (assuming posture is already broken down).
  6. bjjraver is offline

    Featherweight

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    Apr 2007
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    10

    Posted On:
    12/02/2007 3:53pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    when escaping cross side, apply constant forward pressure with your wedge arm, trying to get your elbow to your ear like youre throwing a jab.

    the whole point of shrimping is to get on to your side

    if youre turtled and someone's sprawled in front of you with an over under, now's not the time to be lazy. hit the sitout/ arm drag repeatedly

    and id like to reiterate that submitting somebody from top is much more easy than from bottom, so know your sweeps.
  7. Perrazo is offline

    Featherweight

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    Feb 2007
    Posts
    12

    Posted On:
    12/13/2007 12:18am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've had plenty, but after watching some old private lessons on video a few stood out today:

    1) Position before submission is obvious, and I'm amazed at how often I find myself reminding friends who are less experienced than me abou this. That being said, I don't think you can limit position to guard, side control, etc. Ever try an armbar without shifting your hips, or leaving your knee out while you are placing your foot on the opponents hips? It may work once, but it won't for long. It's not just position that matters, but the quality of the position.

    2) I don't think you can overemphasize the importance of details. Watching a video of my instructor performing a move and then myself repeating it (as opposed to how I felt I was doing it) and the difference is clear. Even when the move is working for me, there is so much room for improvement.

    3) Have a plan. The positions I am most comfortable in are the ones where I "know" what i am trying to do. They are also the positions that I am most likely to improvise effectively from.

    4) Conditioning affects performance. After 2 months off due to injury, it was very telling to see how my performance faltered as I fatigued.

    Last but not least, if you can do privates, I highly recommend them (if you keep the above in mind) and videotape them if you possibly can. I was told this early on, and I find my recordings invaluable in so many ways.
  8. Angry-Monkey is offline

    Welterweight

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    Feb 2003
    Location
    Toronto/Hamilton
    Posts
    593

    Posted On:
    12/15/2007 9:52am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ/Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    For me, the correct use of underhooks/overhooks really changed my game. I had been hearing and reading how important they were for control, especially in no-gi where you lose a lot of grips. I started going for them but never really knew what to do with them afterwards, I was just holding it instead of using the position for control.

    It was only within the past year or so that I truly appreciated how powerful they can be (I use the underhook especially) for breaking posture, controlling people in my guard, setting up triangles and sweeps. I think the epiphany came when i started working more halfguard, in realizing how important that underhook on the side of the trapped leg is for both the top and the bottom.

    Another one which came about a year into training was staying on a hip whenever I'm on the bottom of half-guard or side-control. Despite 'knowing' that I was supposed to 'turn towards him!!!!' I felt much more comfortable lying flat on my back, the effort to fight to get onto my hip just didn't seem worth it. Once I realized I was basically a fish out of water with absolutely no mobility my escapes from the bottom and half-guard game improved a lot.
  9. namaste is offline
    namaste's Avatar

    Registered Member

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    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth, WA
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    558

    Posted On:
    12/19/2007 6:54am


     Style: BJJ, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here's three obvious 'things', but they are not really epiphanies.

    Getting to clinch range is difficult sometimes, especially if you suck at boxing.

    Having your shot smashed into the ground and getting all ground up is ****.

    Training MMA without a solid background in either a striking art or a grappling art isn't the greatest idea. Hence the reason I only really attend the wrestling classes, and I think in the new year I'm going back to Gracie Barra for some gijitsu.
  10. ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE is offline
    ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE's Avatar

    Registered Member

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    Jul 2004
    Location
    North England
    Posts
    643

    Posted On:
    12/19/2007 7:34am


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Just specifically for Judo I realised recently that trainning in class had got me far to reliant on the guard due to the way we practised it, by starting off on the ground it meant I could go on to my back with no penalty, in competition, if I end up on my back with them on top of me it's more than likely going to be from a throw and I'll have lost then anyway. Basically an active guard isn't very useful for Judo even if I can use it a lot in training.

    Another really dumb one came from realising that escaping a bad position has just as much to do with preventing your opponent getting settled in to that position in the first place as it does employing the correct technique to escape the vanilla pin. I spent so long trying to work on and memorise techniques for escaping the different pins and it wasn't a tenth as helpful as simply shrimping out before they could get to me.

    For stand-up, I got a huge improvement in my game when I stopped trying to wrestle people to the floor and started looking for opportunities to use Judo techniques, again it sounds dumb but as a heavyweight I always felt that my best hop was in twisting the other guy to the floor and pinning him, when I started to put a little faith in my techniques, learned to be a little patient and started looking for the techniques I wanted I was very happy to feeel an improvement.

    Grip fighting: Yeah... you should do that. Even before I new what grips I wanted I found that aggressive grip fighting really helped me, now I finally have a grip I want to get I know how to go looking for it.

    Finally, again for stand-up, I got another huge boost when I stopped being afraid to go the ground with my opponents on my throws. The problem stemmed from being the only heavyweight in class and feeling bad about landing on someone when I threw them so trying to remain standing on the throw, when I started to sacrifice my own weight to get the job done, I saw a huge improvement in what I was doing. In addition, I changed the throws I looked for to be ones that used my weight to get the throw done but which didn't land me on top of the other guy, this way I got to practice competition throws in class.
    Last edited by ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE; 12/19/2007 7:41am at .
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