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  1. v1y is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/09/2011 8:59am


     Style: Internet Warrior, BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    alright, well i guess i have no idea what the hell i'm doing then.
  2. Kintanon is offline
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    Yes, I am smarter than you are.

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    Posted On:
    2/09/2011 10:21am

    supporting memberstaff
     Style: TKD, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by judoka_uk View Post
    If by non tripping foot you mean the leg that's not outstretched, you shouldn't trip in Tai otoshi anyway as its a tewaza. Then I'm afraid your epiphany though it maybe a revelation is an incorrect one.

    At an absolute minimum your weight should be evenly distributed between your two legs:



    And ideally the majority of your weight should be on the outstretched leg:

    Not to dispute the statement itself, but I have a hard time believing that the guy in that photo has 70% of his weight on his toes there when his shoulders are above his front knee and his hips are in the middle. That's clearly 70% on the front leg, 30% on the back.

    Of course, high level black belt Judoka may be able to distribute their weight in crazy ways while doing throws, but every position I can get myself into that even barely resembles that has most of my weight on the front foot even if I am pushing off of the back foot.
  3. Permalost is offline
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Posted On:
    2/09/2011 11:30am

    supporting member
     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Kintanon View Post
    Not to dispute the statement itself, but I have a hard time believing that the guy in that photo has 70% of his weight on his toes there when his shoulders are above his front knee and his hips are in the middle.
    This is what I was thinking too. That looks like a front stance/bow stance or fencing lunge (almost), and it's not really feasible to shift the weight in the way you described. I even got up out of my chair *gasp* to see if I could shift from a 50/50 stance and manage to put more weight on the side where I wasn't bending the knee and leaning the torso, and found myself unable to do it.

    In choy li fut we used a sweep like the one you mentioned, but it was using sliding footwork and the bow and arrow stance, where the majority of weight would be on the bent leg. I think maybe you feel like more of your weight is on that leg because in the dynamic of the technique, some of your opponent's weight will be loaded onto your outstretched leg.
  4. Res Judicata is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/09/2011 2:50pm


     Style: Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You're both wrong. And shifting your weight in the outstretched tai otoshi position from side to side is a matter of tiny changes in posture. Tai otoshi is a very difficult technique, however. But when it works, it's magic.
  5. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/10/2011 5:53am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You're right that the picture isn't, perhaps, the best example. As its taken from a video and at that point he's actually turned towards people talking to them. I selected it because its the cleanest full colour image I had at the time.

    Here's a less clean image that shows the positioining a little better:


    I'm not sure why you're encountering so much difficult with the weight distribution as its relatively easy to do when static. The hard part is doing it whilst moving and with a dynamic resisting opponent. Hence why Tai otoshi is such a hard technique.

    Its best not to get too caught up on exact percentages, but the key thing is that if you have the majority of your weight on the non-outstretched leg your technique is majorly flawed. Your hands will fall behind your head risking shoulder injury and demonstrating a lack of effectively applied tsurikomi. This will lead on to abscence of shimekomi and a total failure of the throw unless there is a major height and weight advantage over your opponent or they're a complete beginner and have no defensive skills.

    As Neil Adams shows well in this video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xftzjDgS9n4#t=7m45s
  6. BKR is online now
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    2/10/2011 6:57am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A common concept in throwing (in Judo at least) is to shift/move your weight in the direction you are throwing.

    A gross example would be the fairly common error of leaning backwards during a forward throw.

    Weight shifts are emphemeral and change at any given moment of a throwing action.

    Ben
  7. JorgeCalifornia is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/14/2011 7:42pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Brazilian Jiujitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm still noobish so forgive the obviousness of this but:
    For me it was: top position is better. I guess I thought pulling guard was the real deadly cuz some of the best guys where I train pull guard, including my instructor. I didn't realize they were so good from the top that immediately getting a dominant position on a less skilled opponent was less than challenging for them.
    Realization started to hit me when Royce Gracie came to give a seminar. He told us "many people think I prefer bottom position because I'm in guard a lot and I can submit from there very well. Actually I was against opponents who were stronger than I was and I just ended up in guard. That is not ideal. I like sweeps. I prefer to be on top. And usually I don't think about sweeps cuz in my mind I say forget sweeps, I'm taking YOU down!"
    Also positional transitions helped me SO much. If I'm in side mount and he's shrimping well and might regain guard, I've learned to go to north-south, to opposite side, to knee on belly, to full mount, back to side, to kesa-gatame, etc. Doing this while keeping my weight on my opponent has actually allowed me to gain the upper hand on guys that were both bigger AND better than I am. If I'm about to lose a position (or a submission attempt), I don't cling and hope, I transition to something else. I owe thanx to a generous brown belt for that.
  8. frodo is offline

    Featherweight

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    Posted On:
    3/24/2011 3:29pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It wasn't until I hurt my shoulder that I realized how important it was to keep my elbow close to my side. I injured the internal structure - the cartilage & the labrum. I had to protect it from being kimura'd. I also had to learn to use it most effectively without doing things that hurt it.

    Generally no matter the situation, the solution both of these goals came from having my elbow by my side. I hurt less, which I guess is because the labrum & other structures don't have to work as hard to keep it together. I wonder if that's correct. I also noticed I was able to resist it being pushed/pulled more. When I started working a lot more on moving my opponent's elbows away from his body too, I found it much easier to attack him.

    I've "known" this fact for years, but for some reason it's true importance didn't click. It is funny that I really didn't appreciated it until I got hurt. Then I had to concentrate on it.
  9. datdamnmachine is offline
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    Jiu Jitsu - Sometimes passing just isn't an option.

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    Posted On:
    4/07/2011 3:22pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ, Unauthorized Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Honestly, Cane Prevost's "P" Model from SBG. There are a lot of "ah ha" and "oh wow" type moment's I've had in BJJ but nothing of the magnitude of this. It essentially forced me to re-learn a lot of what I've been doing as well as how I teach it. Results have been positive in my learning and the teaching of others (however, as with anything, learning requires you to fail a lot so I haven't been getting as many subs - which is OK by me).

    One thing I have been thinking about lately that is coming close to an epiphany is the idea of lower body attacks (leg locks). Specifically, how to better incorporate them into BJJ both training, instruction, and theory. I wanted to ensure the idea of "position before submission" is maintained without having it used as an excuse not to train leg attacks and other techniques that BJJ has a stigma about. I came up with the following:

    - It is positional based martial art that looks at the various ground based positions as a hierarchy from worst to best. The focuses of the worst positions are survival and escapes from these disadvantageous positions. The focuses of the best positions are attacks and transitions to other advantageous positions. As you move from the worst positions to the best positions you will move more from that focus of survival and escapes to submissions and transitions.

    - As you make this movement from the worst to best positions, submission potential increases as well as the potential to attempt submissions without effectively losing the position that initiated the submission. At the same time, attempting these submissions in the lower classes of the positional hierarchy provides a higher percentage chance of being countered with another submission than at the higher positional hierarchy.

    - In some cases, the submission attempt itself, when used effectively, can be used to obtain greater positional dominance (i.e. using a leg lock from Half Guard Bottom to obtain top control of some sort Ė or even Full Guard Bottom)

    This is just some draft stuff I am working on but, after fleshing it out, it may be something special...or fluff...who knows. It's still in the theory phase so more testing is required.
  10. SBG-ape is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/26/2011 3:39pm


     Style: Jiu-jitsu & HEMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by datdamnmachine View Post
    Honestly, Cane Prevost's "P" Model from SBG. There are a lot of "ah ha" and "oh wow" type moment's I've had in BJJ but nothing of the magnitude of this. It essentially forced me to re-learn a lot of what I've been doing as well as how I teach it. Results have been positive in my learning and the teaching of others (however, as with anything, learning requires you to fail a lot so I haven't been getting as many subs - which is OK by me).


    Iím spoiled. Cane is one of my coaches & Iíve spent enough time in his classes that my brain automatically sees jiu-jitsu through the Posture, pressure, potential lens. Itís something that Iím very grateful for.

    Now, as a butt-scooting jiu-jitsu player Iíve been making a real effort lately to improve my wrestling. Hereís my super obvious epiphany: When my opponent wants to shoot my defense shouldnít consist solely of trying to sprawl when he takes his penetration step. When he level changes to set up his shot I should level change too otherwise Iím at a big postural disadvantage. Itís been amazing to me how many shots I can preempt with a good level change.
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