225138 Bullies, 3947 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 12
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. CrazyCrowbarMan is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Dallas, GA
    Posts
    42

    Posted On:
    10/25/2007 2:23pm


     Style: TKD, HKD, Judo n00b

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Alternate definition of "one-step", "two-step" etc.?

    Hi all good to be back (though some may be saying "gahhh here comes this r-tard" lol)

    I see a lot of bandying about, esp here, about one step sparring, and sometimes three-step. Best I can gather, its the ubiquitous technique drills where an attacker does something, and then the defender blocks or moves and counters in some fashion. Repeat the same drill, etc.

    However, at my dojang, whenever my instructor has us do what he calls 'one' step, its much different. Our 'one step' is essentially WTF style: either w/o pads & real light contact if its a class and a lot of low belts and folks don't who have gear; or w/ the tkd gear and contact ranging from light-medium to 'ktfo' depending on the general belt level and what he wants to focus on (and also dependent upon sort of a silent agreement within each pair). What makes it one, two, or three step is essentially its turn based in that manner: i.e., in two step, Fighter A throws two techniques at their will (preferably in a combination or with some good footwork in between), then Fighter B throws two, then back to Fighter A, etc.

    I guess my question is, does this sound at all familiar to anyone else as far as something common? Any thoughts on using it as sort of a bridge or build up to full-contact WTF? My own preferences is to grab somebody who's up for it after class and go padless, light-medium onestep, with the addition of leg kicks and occasional open-hands to head.

    Btw, when we occasionally do drills, they are always from a fighting stance (HANDS UP! esp when I am working them, or they will get lightly smacked on the head or the **** slapped out of their hands), and very much stick to simple block/one hit or move/one hit counters to regular things...jabs, crosses, hooks. For whatever that's worth

    Thanks,
    Scott
  2. kwoww is offline
    kwoww's Avatar

    poser

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Lower Hudson Valley / Rochester
    Posts
    1,986

    Posted On:
    10/29/2007 9:48pm


     Style: punching bag / crew jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by CrazyCrowbarMan
    However, at my dojang, whenever my instructor has us do what he calls 'one' step, its much different. Our 'one step' is essentially WTF style: either w/o pads & real light contact if its a class and a lot of low belts and folks don't who have gear; or w/ the tkd gear and contact ranging from light-medium to 'ktfo' depending on the general belt level and what he wants to focus on (and also dependent upon sort of a silent agreement within each pair). What makes it one, two, or three step is essentially its turn based in that manner: i.e., in two step, Fighter A throws two techniques at their will (preferably in a combination or with some good footwork in between), then Fighter B throws two, then back to Fighter A, etc.

    I guess my question is, does this sound at all familiar to anyone else as far as something common? Any thoughts on using it as sort of a bridge or build up to full-contact WTF? My own preferences is to grab somebody who's up for it after class and go padless, light-medium onestep, with the addition of leg kicks and occasional open-hands to head.

    Btw, when we occasionally do drills, they are always from a fighting stance (HANDS UP! esp when I am working them, or they will get lightly smacked on the head or the **** slapped out of their hands), and very much stick to simple block/one hit or move/one hit counters to regular things...jabs, crosses, hooks. For whatever that's worth

    Thanks,
    Scott
    Sounds basically like how schools that actually care about fighting ability train. Reminds me of the few trial classes I've watched/taken of BJJ, actually, except for TKD. What's your dojang called, where's it located, etc.?
  3. CrazyCrowbarMan is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Dallas, GA
    Posts
    42

    Posted On:
    10/29/2007 10:30pm


     Style: TKD, HKD, Judo n00b

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for the props. Instructor is kind of an odd blend, very into the traditional 'Art' aspect, but also very much emphasizes keeping hands up, good fighting stance & simple footwork & strikes, and almost never going for a head kick in any sort of self-defense.

    School's name? Hahah that's actually kind of an in joke among those of us who've been there a few years.....if I had to use one it would be 'Georgia TaeKwonDo & HapKiDo Association'. Is located in Georgia, out past Marietta for you Jawja folks that read this. Master is about 55 or older, but has forearms like 2x4s, been teaching probably a good 20 years, practitioner a lot longer. He's a kinda short but brick-shithouse Hawaiian-Korean guy name Kimo Roy Lee.
  4. praetorian01 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    138

    Posted On:
    11/19/2007 4:18am


     Style: many; box,TKD,croty,BJJ..

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    One steps- sorta a pet ppeve of mine ,but they are good for introducing the gunshy and little ones to the concept of they do someting, now you counter and do something back. Godd for showing self defences too in a way. Alot of styles use this style of teaching but don't call them one steps. In my style you could call them three steps or more.

    An example for the young kids you could have a guy do a straight punch- then the responder can use a block, backfist, low puncn, roundhouse, then step back and clear with another block- tends to be quite static. But, again its for begginers to teach the concept of combinations too. There is even a rhyme I could teach you- but its tres ga3y. We don't tend to use them every day, but can be a good exercise if you are stuck. And, kinda fun at full power... Just give them a decent combo to test out and it can prove usefull and you can teach the concept of grafting etc.. like in kenpo and lots of other arts to show each move is connected and not its own separate entity. (yeah a know a little EP)
    Last edited by praetorian01; 11/19/2007 4:21am at .
  5. CrazyCrowbarMan is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Dallas, GA
    Posts
    42

    Posted On:
    11/19/2007 9:43am


     Style: TKD, HKD, Judo n00b

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by praetorian01
    An example for the young kids you could have a guy do a straight punch- then the responder can use a block, backfist, low puncn, roundhouse, then step back and clear with another block- tends to be quite static. But, again its for begginers to teach
    I think you misunderstand. Or maybe I misunderstood your post. What I was trying to get across is that there is no set pattern to it. The only short way I can think to explain it is in my nerd talk. Think of it like a turn based rpg or strategy game, but its full speed, varying contact sparring. You do one 'something' (I don't know what), then I do 'something' that you don't know in advance, which may even be just a counter to what you did, or may not. Etc.
  6. EternalRage is offline
    EternalRage's Avatar

    WARNING: BJJ may cause airway obstruction.

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    3,360

    Posted On:
    11/19/2007 5:13pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Bajillion Joo Jizzu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by CrazyCrowbarMan
    Hi all good to be back (though some may be saying "gahhh here comes this r-tard" lol)

    I see a lot of bandying about, esp here, about one step sparring, and sometimes three-step. Best I can gather, its the ubiquitous technique drills where an attacker does something, and then the defender blocks or moves and counters in some fashion. Repeat the same drill, etc.
    It's not just that. If it was attack and counter, even at a prearranged level, it might be useful to teach just basic movement or strategy. The problem with one steps is that half the time, they are using attacking techniques that you will never use in sparring (ie choong dan kong kyuk in chun gul jahseh) or the counter is utterly ridiculous (infamous crescent kick to the punch).

    However, at my dojang, whenever my instructor has us do what he calls 'one' step, its much different. Our 'one step' is essentially WTF style: either w/o pads & real light contact if its a class and a lot of low belts and folks don't who have gear; or w/ the tkd gear and contact ranging from light-medium to 'ktfo' depending on the general belt level and what he wants to focus on (and also dependent upon sort of a silent agreement within each pair). What makes it one, two, or three step is essentially its turn based in that manner: i.e., in two step, Fighter A throws two techniques at their will (preferably in a combination or with some good footwork in between), then Fighter B throws two, then back to Fighter A, etc.

    I guess my question is, does this sound at all familiar to anyone else as far as something common? Any thoughts on using it as sort of a bridge or build up to full-contact WTF? My own preferences is to grab somebody who's up for it after class and go padless, light-medium onestep, with the addition of leg kicks and occasional open-hands to head.
    That's not what most people are referring to when they say "one step". What you are talking about is like attack and counter drilling or just simply sparring with different set of rules.

    Btw, when we occasionally do drills, they are always from a fighting stance (HANDS UP! esp when I am working them, or they will get lightly smacked on the head or the **** slapped out of their hands), and very much stick to simple block/one hit or move/one hit counters to regular things...jabs, crosses, hooks. For whatever that's worth
    It's worth a little. Just because hands are up doesn't mean they know what to do from there, but it's better than bouncing around with them down.
  7. Noslen is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Seoul, Korea
    Posts
    29

    Posted On:
    12/06/2007 9:02am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Tae Kwon Do

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    We use them as counter-attack/sparring training with three-step sparring being the easiest and one-step sparring being the most advanced and difficult. Three and two-step allow the defender more time to counter and move while one-step is immediate. One-step is difficult not only because of the constant exchange(counter to counter to counter...), but because you must step down from kicking into a position for the next kick and while maintaining a good distance and while defending from the other guy's counter. No-one knows what technique will be used next - no set responses except maybe those you know may work (turn around swing countering a round house, for example). Three, two and one-step sparring are used to prepare people for free-sparring in the dojangs I have been involved with.
    Last edited by Noslen; 12/06/2007 9:36am at .
  8. odojang is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    24

    Posted On:
    12/06/2007 4:40pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Taekwon-Do

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In my school, step-sparring is the initial part of the whole sparring methodology as a progressive learning tool for actual use of what has been learned. It serves as a bridge between formal training (like patterns, technical drills etc) and application (competition, self-defense and such).

    Their main purpose is threefold:

    1- To apply technical knowledge and ability in order to understand how and why it may or may not work BY testing with a live opponent

    2- To study how distance, angle, footwork, synchronism etc affect the proper use of technique and build proficiency in those variables

    3- To train reaction time from basic reaction (after the attack is launched) to advanced reaction (when the attack is launched) up to expert reaction (before the attack is launched)

    As per the Taekwon-Do Encyclopedia, we use the folowing formats:

    - 3-step sparring (for 10th to 7th grade)
    starting posture: walking stance with low block; attack comes from rear hand or leg with measuring step and a signal prior to launching the attack
    execution: any attack & defense repeated 3 times; one precise counter attack at the end
    The student practice a pre-arranged order of movements done in 3 steps, much like a mini- pattern with a partner. He must also devise some sequences himself to demonstrate how well he understands his techniques and what are those he prefers to train in/or wants to learn

    - 2-step sparring (for 6th to4th grade)
    starting posture : L stance with double guarding block; attack may be any combination of hand and foot technique from either side; starting signal but no measuring step
    execution: two different attacks in combination; one or two precise counter attacks at second attack phase
    The student learns pre-arranged basic combos and develop his own much like a semi-free sparring drill to devise his own personal fighting combos according to his abilities and personality, for his objectives.
    At that level, students do also semi-free sparring where any of the participants can launch a pre-set attack combo to wich the other must respond properly with a pre-set defense and counter, much like a free flowing 3-step sparring (just as described in the starting post). here also they must come to devise their own combinations.

    - 1-step sparring (for 3rd to 1st grade)
    starting posture: parallel stance, neutral posture; no measuring step; 3rd grade use signal with pre-set technique; 2nd grade use pre-set technique with no signal; 1st grade use signal with no pre-set technique
    execution: one sudden attack ; one defense and/or counter
    Student do both pre-determined basic move and moves of their own. Techniques are not limited to strikes or to front-facing posture
    At this stage, semi-free sparring adopts the pattern of 2-step sparring and free sparring is mandatory to test further what has been learned. Free sparring is not limited to one vs one standing opponents. In our school, we do not follow any competition rules and limitations unless the student specifically wants to train for those.

    At black belt levels, the whole set of pre-arranged sparring is reused for study/training against two opponents (3 step for 1st dan; 2-step for 2nd dan; 1 step for 3rd dan). 4th dan and above restart anew against weapons.
    Standard 1-step is done by all black belts with no measuring, no signal and no pre-set technique to perfect their prefered techniques and reactions.

    Finally, and this is the core of it, it must be stressed that at all levels, attacks are launched at full force and correct distance to successfully hit the partner unless he reacts in time and correctly at the proper distance. Parries are likewise executed fully. No kicking-away--or grab-extended-finished-punch nonsense. The attack finishes in your flesh, not in the air... unless you properly defend.

    Following such methodology has proven effective to bring even the most timid and untalented person to some basic proficiency by allowing progressive acclimatation to the necessities of full confrontation without compromising too much on the realism of it (opponent"s speed, strenght, reach, reaction etc). For those already full of talent and fighting spirit, it serves to refine their natural combativeness by making them understand why things works or don't a t any given time, and how to find solutions to such limits.
  9. HippoKing is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    36

    Posted On:
    1/03/2008 9:09pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    At my school, one steps are a way to teach self defense applications and are kinda like mini-forms
    What I mean is they are pre-scripted and the attacker does nothing after the initial attack, and use "form" stances (i.e. front, horse, cat).
    The way they are usually performed is very formal:
    The attacker steps back into a front stance high block
    The attacker screams (kiai's) to announce his attack
    The defender chambers his block
    The defender screams to say he is ready
    The actual one step is performed
    Both go back to choombi
    The simplest ones , such as a block and palm strike, are used to discipline new students for forms.
    They also commonly teach basic stand up grappling such as locks, take-downs, and joint breaks.
    For us, the "two steps" are a set that were meant to be practiced on multiple opponents or to close distance between you and an opponent before attacking. An example would be a roll to a leg-scissor (not really sure what the technique's called....)
    Theres also a few "one step two punch sparrings" which are designed to simulate close range fighting and are done from a cat stance.
    The "back and forth" pre-arranged sparring described above is done in a multiple-part form called yuk suk daryan (not sure of spelling)
    Unfortunately, this form is almost entirely for show. Even the instructors have WTF'd a couple of times but go ahead with the "thats how I learned it, thats how I'll pass it on..." mentality. I mean, at one point you go down on your knee to high-block a waist-high front kick.
  10. ChiRho777 is offline

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2

    Posted On:
    3/10/2008 12:11pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    They call that exchange fighting where I train. Its the mandatory step before light free sparring. Two attacks, then as fast as possible your partner throws two. We usually do this for one minute rounds. It sounds the same as what everyone else has said but nobody called it exchange fighting.
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.