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  1. TheMightyMcClaw is offline
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    MADE OF STEEL!

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    Posted On:
    10/21/2007 11:50pm

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     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Exercises for Triangle Choke

    Hey,
    I'm a lanky guy, and as a result, the triangle is my Number One submission. What exercises should I be doing at the gym to strengthen the muscles used for triangles?
  2. Teh El Macho is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/22/2007 4:38pm

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     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Eddie Bravo advocates on working the hamstrings (and calves IIRC) to improve your triangle choke - having said that, I'm sure he also meant that such strenght training is a supplement to technique. No matter how strong your hamstrings are, no technique, no choke.

    If we entertain the idea of strenght, you are doing a compression by contracting your hamstrings and popping your hips. And that contraction is a static contraction. If you have never done any form of strenght training, and if you feel you need to strenghten your legs for this, you should look into things such as full squats, walking lunges and deadlifts. Another exercise for developing a strong contraction is one-leg leg curls.

    For the later, get on the leg curl machine, with a good load (good depending on you, something heavy enough to let you do 6 or 8 reps but no more.) Bring your calf up to your butt and keep the contraction locked for a number of seconds (4 for example). Then bring it down. That's one rep. See how many you can do.

    Another alternative is to do the following with a training partner. Same as before, but instead of holding the contraction for 4 seconds, have your partner pull your leg down lightly/moderatelly (adding to the load). Your job is to slowly resist that pull while bringing the load down in 4 seconds.

    You also need to work out your calves, or at least make sure they are streched out and warmed up. Not doing so can guarantee you getting a cramp on your calves when least expected (but that would also be a sign of trying to outmuscle rather than applying good technique.)

    I mean, there are a lot of variables involved. The moment you work out your hamstrings, you need to work your quads to avoid imbalances (preferencially using one-leg leg extensions to strenghten the vastus medialis... to protect the kneecap). If you workout your calves, you need to work out your shins and make sure the plant of your feet are pliable and flexible.

    You should start with some form of full body leg workouts (squats and deadlifts) perhaps combined with lunges and the hamstring curl exercises mentioned above.

    Again, proper technique superseeds strenght training. Strenght training supplements/complements technique. It does not replaces it nor server as a patch for technical errors.

    Good luck.
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  3. gangrelchilde is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/22/2007 6:54pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I also live on the adduction/abduction machines. I used the adduction machine to rehab my knee and realized it was a hell of a useful piece of equipment. As a matter of fact I was just at a workshop this past weekend and all the upper-level students who stuck around afterwards were extolling the virtues of that machine. Trust me, it's a good piece of equipment. Not just for chicks anymore!
  4. TheMightyMcClaw is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/23/2007 4:45pm

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     Style: MMA

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by gangrelchilde
    I also live on the adduction/abduction machines. I used the adduction machine to rehab my knee and realized it was a hell of a useful piece of equipment. As a matter of fact I was just at a workshop this past weekend and all the upper-level students who stuck around afterwards were extolling the virtues of that machine. Trust me, it's a good piece of equipment. Not just for chicks anymore!
    I also use this machine a lot. I found that it improved my head kicking like nothing else could. For a long time, I couldn't figure why I couldn't throw a high roundhouse despite being able to to do the splits. Turns out, I had some weak-ass hips.
  5. Teh El Macho is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/23/2007 6:06pm

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     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Not so related to the original topic, but...

    for weak hips, sumo deadlifts with high pulls are a good thing (the first part of the exercise below)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmzaxY88RoU

    However, you do those with a small variation: unlike the guy in the video, you pop your hips forward as the bar travels above your hips. That is, you are using your hips to propel the bar up.

    The guy in the clip does a high pull (mostly an arm and shoulder work), which is fine. But if you include the hips (making it more a hip movement than an arm/shoulder), you'll hit your glutes.

    Best way to think of this (in a pretty ghey way), imagine you have a walnut in the crack of your ass, and that you are cracking it the moment the bar is passing about your hips. You have to contract your glutes strongly AND your your hips forward a few inches (all in one movement).

    Do those in sets of 20, even if you need to pause and resume. You are going to get a mighty cramp in your ass. The closest thing that hits the glutes are lunges (at least for me), and they don't come close since this hits not just the glutes but the entire hips.
    Last edited by Teh El Macho; 10/23/2007 6:31pm at .
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris

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