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  1. PPlate is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/24/2007 4:43am


     Style: Muay Thai, Boxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by feedback
    I think he's talking about the Old-school crazy monkey (we don't do it like that anymore) where you run your fingers back through your hair to get the elbow up high enough. I prefer to just shell and use a modified hook defense.
    feeback, what do you mean old school crazy monkey? I haven't gone for any more courses, has Rodney changed how he does it? If so, how? thank you.
      #31
  2. Kung-Fu Joe is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/24/2007 10:39am


     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by oversteer
    I know it's arguing semantics, but to me, a block means putting something solid in the way of a blow - like that karate dude's forearm in the way of a low kick (punch?) - whereas parrying is more redirecting the opponents force, like a boxing parry. Maybe in fencing they mean the same thing. I'm not a fencer.
    I can't speak for Eastern schools of fencing, but in Western fencing there's not really any such thing as a block. Not an intentional one, at least. There have been times when one fencer's attack catches on the opponent's bell guard, accidentally, but this is generally considered both a poor attack and a poor defense.

    Everything in Western fencing is a parry. You're simply redirecting the opponent's blade-- you are not stopping their attack. Honestly, I've always thought that Karate style blocking was poorly named-- it's more of a strong parry than a block. In your video example above, that gedan barai low block isn't meant to intercept the low kick by standing between the attacker's foot and the defender's body. It's meant to strike at the leg, moving the attacker's attack out of line.

    --Joe
      #32
  3. selfcritical is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/24/2007 12:16pm


     Style: Pekiti, ARMA, other stuff

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Kung-Fu Joe
    I can't speak for Eastern schools of fencing, but in Western fencing there's not really any such thing as a block. Not an intentional one, at least. There have been times when one fencer's attack catches on the opponent's bell guard, accidentally, but this is generally considered both a poor attack and a poor defense.

    Everything in Western fencing is a parry. You're simply redirecting the opponent's blade-- you are not stopping their attack. Honestly, I've always thought that Karate style blocking was poorly named-- it's more of a strong parry than a block. In your video example above, that gedan barai low block isn't meant to intercept the low kick by standing between the attacker's foot and the defender's body. It's meant to strike at the leg, moving the attacker's attack out of line.

    --Joe

    Are you including saber here? Because some of those "parries" are pretty block-ish
      #33
  4. Kung-Fu Joe is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/24/2007 12:48pm


     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by selfcritical
    Are you including saber here? Because some of those "parries" are pretty block-ish
    Even saber parries are meant as deflections rather than interdictions.

    The reason you don't block in fencing, as compared to parrying, is that it allows you to counter-attack before your opponent has completed his attack. By moving the opponent's blade away from a viable line of attack, you no longer have to worry about it-- it's not going to hit you. You can safely ignore that attack. Even better, a proper parry keeps your blade on a line of attack for a riposte. If you blocked, you would have to reset into an attack position before you could strike, giving your opponent time to recover; however, with a parry, you can immediately counter-attack, while your opponent is still engaged in his own attack.

    That said, I'll stop shitting up the thread with talk of fencing. But the same principles are applied in boxing parries-- by deflecting the attack out of line with a minimum of defensive motion, you can immediately counter-attack while the opponent's guard is open.

    --Joe
      #34
  5. AAAhmed46 is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/24/2007 1:13pm


     Style: karate,MMA(between gyms)

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Read some of jack dempsey's stuff. Especially the whale punch ranks first and aggressive defense thing(i forgot what this book was called, it's a e-book)
      #35
  6. feedback is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/24/2007 3:07pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Muay Thai

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by PPlate
    feeback, what do you mean old school crazy monkey? I haven't gone for any more courses, has Rodney changed how he does it? If so, how? thank you.
    I believe they've evolved the CM to be more fluid and compatible with offense. You no longer keep your hands up on top of your head, it's more near your temples. It's kind of hard to describe except to say that it's a better balance of defense and offense than before, I always thought the old CM was a little too inflexible except as a situational thing.
    Tough is not how you act, tough is how you train.
      #36
  7. PPlate is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/24/2007 10:04pm


     Style: Muay Thai, Boxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by feedback
    I believe they've evolved the CM to be more fluid and compatible with offense. You no longer keep your hands up on top of your head, it's more near your temples. It's kind of hard to describe except to say that it's a better balance of defense and offense than before, I always thought the old CM was a little too inflexible except as a situational thing.
    Yes, I've never liked punching off the top of the head, it feels wierd and I feel it lacks power. I prefer to hold my hands at the cheekbones, may be a bit slower, but it works for me. And it allows you to do other stuff, like parry and catch.
      #37
  8. ergo is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/25/2007 2:14am


     Style: Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by PPlate
    Why do you think the blocks you were taught won't work without gloves? Try punching into someone's elbow once and you'll realize just how good it works.
    The elbow isn't in the way, only your arm is. Since no gloves are involved, your hand covers a smaller area and your opponent's hand is smaller.
      #38
  9. Amp is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/25/2007 12:18pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: bjj

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ergo
    I've been going to a MT gym for several weeks now, and today we learned how to block straight punches and hooks. A straight punch is blocked by pressing your glove against your forehead, with your palm pointing at you. Hooks are blocked by pressing your glove against the side of your head, with your elbow pointing towards the opponent, and slightly inwards (or so).

    I suppose these are fine in the context of MT, but they're suicide in a self-defense situation, where nobody is wearing big boxing gloves. I train for SD and not competitions, so that's kind of a big deal to me. I was thinking of learning some boxing next year, but I'm wondering what most instructors would think about someone incorporating boxing techniques into sparring. Is that generally accepted, or is there some reason why you shouldn't use boxing-style blocks and evasions in MT?
    Just move your arms up higher so you're blocking with your forearms..h
      #39
  10. DreadSkin is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/08/2008 5:22am

    Bullshido Newbie
     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    theres alot of talk bout what would actually work in a street fight. has nobody actually been in a street confrontion or is all this just based on theory and youtube 'research? (apart from omega the big bad killa man of course)
      #40
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