Page 7 of 8 First ... 345678 Last
  1. #61

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Scotland/Philippines
    Posts
    741
    Style
    Muay Thai
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by oldman34
    I believe 5 white kids beat up 1 black kid and got simple assault.

    Then 6 black kids beat up 1 white kid in retaliation, and got charged with attempted murder.
    Worse than that. A white kid pulled a shotgun on a couple of black kids but they managed to wrestle it away from him and run away. The white kid got nothing; The black kids got charged with theft of the firearm!

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=12353776

  2. #62

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    47
    Style
    ex-tai chi
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    One of my instructor's is a bad example of arrogance, and it definitely spills over to non-TMA topics, so I'd say it'd be the man first, and the MA second. I remember him telling me that by doing tai chi and that alone without weights training or anything else, I couldn't possibly land a finger on him

    Felt good to get in a solid hit to his right oblique

  3. #63
    cyril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    831
    Style
    No-Gi BJJ
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by tatsu84
    One of my instructor's is a bad example of arrogance, and it definitely spills over to non-TMA topics, so I'd say it'd be the man first, and the MA second. I remember him telling me that by doing tai chi and that alone without weights training or anything else, I couldn't possibly land a finger on him

    Felt good to get in a solid hit to his right oblique
    A lot of TMAs breed this non-sense and try to sell it to you like it's fresh. Don't weighttrain ever because you'll get musclebound/build the wrong muscles (What the hell?). Don't study other styles, it will confuse you, and you'll end up Jack of all Trades, and master of none. Meditation can cure your cancer better than any chemo. All sorts of lies that would make you think that they have teh r34l.

    The sad thing is, everyone has heard that martial arts take a long time to perfect, everyone has heard that martial arts are a never ending journey, and that you need inner peace in order to be a true martial artist. Since that's what sepparates you from a brutish brawler. Some people just buy in to it, and don't realize that they're NOT training hard, or that they're trying to make a hobby much more important than it actually is. It's okay for the professionals to do that, and even most amatuers, but the hobbiests that think that they can beat anything under the sun have gone WAY overboard.

    That's why we have this forum. It's for handing out the humble pie in dump-trucks.

  4. #64

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    47
    Style
    ex-tai chi
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by cyril
    A lot of TMAs breed this non-sense and try to sell it to you like it's fresh. Don't weighttrain ever because you'll get musclebound/build the wrong muscles (What the hell?). Don't study other styles, it will confuse you, and you'll end up Jack of all Trades, and master of none. Meditation can cure your cancer better than any chemo. All sorts of lies that would make you think that they have teh r34l.
    Oh yeh, i forgot to mention elaborate about why i felt good hitting him in the oblique (other than the obvious it's always going to feel good to pull one over someone who's better trained than you), just before we put the gloves on, i mentioned i was doing weight training at the same time, he said the exact same thing "Oh, you doing weights?? You know, you don't need to do them. Training's enough, and if you do weights, you can't fire off your hits quick enough"

    Needless to say, the left hand punch left him hunched over after we finished our bout, and despite him being much quicker than me i got the hit in...

  5. #65

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,166
    Style
    BJJ
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think we need to more explicity define arrogance. There is arrogance that is a good-natured humorous cocky attitude that is kind to little old ladies, stray dogs, and children.

    Then there is arrogance that is delusional, stick-up-the-ass, no sense of humor, and mean to little old ladies, stray dogs, and children.

    Everybody has a little pride...

  6. #66
    cyril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    831
    Style
    No-Gi BJJ
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by chingythingy
    I think we need to more explicity define arrogance. There is arrogance that is a good-natured humorous cocky attitude that is kind to little old ladies, stray dogs, and children.

    Then there is arrogance that is delusional, stick-up-the-ass, no sense of humor, and mean to little old ladies, stray dogs, and children.

    Everybody has a little pride...
    For TMAs, it's generally the second, unfortunatly. A byproduct of trust in their T3H D34DLY makes them think themselves invincible in all circumstances, thus above any other mere mortals. Except their grandmasters, of course.

    But yeah, some of them are just misguided.

  7. #67

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Posts
    492
    Style
    Kickboxing, Boxing, BJJ
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In my old TKD school, when I was a naive sophomore, we didn't spar full contact for fear that all of our stuff was effective. No one questioned the system, everyone had total faith that whatever Master Choi taught was reality.

    Compared to last night where any fancy ass leg lock usually had to stand up to sparring (and usually resulted in the person being swept by the fundamentals), there was an obvious and definite difference. The ability to consistently and effectively apply techniques is what makes them effective, not theories. Isn't this the conclusion Jigoro Kano came too all those years ago?

    And personal "My style/skill/fandom/whatever is better" usually goes away pretty quick once you get beat down by someone better, whether it's getting hit hard or having your arm bent to the breaking point.

    Humans understand discomfort more than any other language in the world.
    Last edited by yodaman; 10/12/2007 2:21pm at .

  8. #68
    M1K3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Southern NJ
    Posts
    2,363
    Style
    submission grappling
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I feel that there is no arrogance being cultivated or encouraged by traditional martial arts, in particular Wing Tsun.

    Dr. Professor Leung Ting, Master of Almightiness.

    :adora: :adora: :adora: :adora: :adora: :adora: :adora:

  9. #69

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    23
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I agree that some TMAs promote arrogance.

    When I did Bujinkan there was never any talk about what to do after you got hit because the assumption was it would never happen. When an instructor sometimes got hit, y accident you could tell that the uke felt like he had done something wrong. The instructor would also look flustered.


    When an instructor made a mistake that wasn't attributable to the uke it was usually passed off as a variation or there would be some weird explanation to make it seem like the mistake was an intentional strategic response ... ie, "by falling down here you can avoid gunfire":icon_roll

    I think as an instructor you are doing your students a disservice if you don't own up to mistakes and show them how to recover from them. To pretend you don't make mistakes is to promote arrogance

    Jeff

  10. #70

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    angola, ny
    Posts
    2,040
    Style
    Liu Seong Gung Fu
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    'For TMAs, it's generally the second, unfortunatly. A byproduct of trust in their T3H D34DLY makes them think themselves invincible in all circumstances, thus above any other mere mortals. Except their grandmasters, of course.'

    +rep.

    it is the sense of belonging to something special, and unique that gives you an unbeatable advantage.

    in most cases, people take up ma to because they feel inadequate in some area. beyond basic coordinations, execution is a confidence issue. so a big part of tma training to build confidence. however, the way this is often done only results in arrogance/egotism. this, of course, reaches it's apex in shools that do not compete, spar, or 'troubleshoot' their methods.

Page 7 of 8 First ... 345678 Last

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO