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  1. #11

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by golsa
    Stuff like meeting a haymaker with a wrist grab & elbow to the knuckles. Not exactly legal in the cage, but a quick way to end a streetfight.
    Absolutely legal in the cage, just completely ineffective.

    Next time you catch the punch of someone that is actually trying to hurt you, please write it down, because its a red letter day for sure.


    To the OP, yes these type of good RBSD schools do exist, but are hard to find.
    "Sifu, I"m niether - I'm a fire dragon so don't **** with me!"

  2. #12

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Askari
    Absolutely legal in the cage, just completely ineffective.

    Next time you catch the punch of someone that is actually trying to hurt you, please write it down, because its a red letter day for sure.


    To the OP, yes these type of good RBSD schools do exist, but are hard to find.
    Dunno who said anything about catching it - its pretty much a parry you meet with an elbow. But assuming it doesn't fall under the small joint rule, I'd still agree with several others who said gloves would make it worthless in a cage fight.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by golsa
    Stuff like meeting a haymaker with a wrist grab & elbow to the knuckles. Not exactly legal in the cage, but a quick way to end a streetfight.
    Quote Originally Posted by golsa
    Dunno who said anything about catching it - its pretty much a parry you meet with an elbow. But assuming it doesn't fall under the small joint rule, I'd still agree with several others who said gloves would make it worthless in a cage fight.
    Do you even read your own posts?

    Grabbing someones wrist as they throw a haymaker at you is a fine motor skill, it just doesnt happen with a high enough percentage when fight stress is part of the equation to make it even worth training.

    What you describe is fully legal to try in the cage, it just doesnt work.

    It falls into the category of "Dojo techniques:"

    That is; in the dojo, when everyones smiling and happy and the stress is low you can do goofy things, but the reason it would not work in the ring has nothing to do with gloves being on or not.
    "Sifu, I"m niether - I'm a fire dragon so don't **** with me!"

  4. #14
    Virus's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Where did you get the idea that grabbing someone's punch and elbowing their hand was a sensible technique? Aikido? Don't do aikido.

  5. #15
    T3h R34l Gangnam Style! staff
    Wolf's Avatar
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    In response to the video of the aikido comp....just do judo.




    god, what happened to me...you folks have turned me into a cynical bastard.

  6. #16
    TheMightyMcClaw's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Homersmyid
    Hello, I found this site via Wikipeida. I know finding a good martial arts school is difficult, so having a site that exposes the majority of schools that are BS is good. I guess the reason for this is most people in life are full of BS, so it makes sense.

    However, from reading the FAQ it seems that there is a pro MMA stance to the community. Especially in regards to effective self defense. I'm just asking because that's the impression I got from the FAQ.

    So that leads to my question. It seems in the area of self defense its either scenarios or full contact MMA stlye geared towards sport. But it would seem best to combine the both, no? Like a full contact competition but with one oppenent armed with a rubber knife and the rule that if you get stabbed you lose, It wouldn't be a fair fight, but it would be great training it seems. Any such thing exist?
    What you're describing is essentially what I did this afternoon. I got together with a friend from school (who did FMA and JKD for some years) and we sparred empty hand (MMA), then knife vs knife, then knife vs empty hand. He was trying to stab me, I was trying to gain control of the knife and apply a finish or disarm without getting cut. We also did variations where he started with the knife in his pocket, or from various positions on the ground.
    It is very hard to find this type of training in a school, but it's quite easy to get together and do so with your friends. I've also done stick vs empty hand and two vs one situational sparring in the past. You're at a disadvantage, of course, but it's the most logical way to train for these types of scenarios.
    If you're really out to get self-defense, I would recomend finding a good MMA/Krav Maga/ Sambo/whatever place, and then filling in the gaps in your training with friends.

  7. #17

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf
    god, what happened to me...you folks have turned me into a cynical bastard.
    There was a good discussion about alive training turning people into cynics in another thread, however i agree with what was said there, which is that its better to be a cynical bastard than an ignorant one.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheMightyMcClaw
    What you're describing is essentially what I did this afternoon. I got together with a friend from school (who did FMA and JKD for some years) and we sparred empty hand (MMA), then knife vs knife, then knife vs empty hand. He was trying to stab me, I was trying to gain control of the knife and apply a finish or disarm without getting cut. We also did variations where he started with the knife in his pocket, or from various positions on the ground.
    It is very hard to find this type of training in a school, but it's quite easy to get together and do so with your friends. I've also done stick vs empty hand and two vs one situational sparring in the past. You're at a disadvantage, of course, but it's the most logical way to train for these types of scenarios.
    I also like claw's idea of sparring with one or more EXPERIENCED friends. i stress experience because messing around with inexperienced people and knives is definitely not recommended. I don't know your experience claw but im sure i wouldn't train with a live blade with anyone but a person i was very comfortable with and know their skill level.

  8. #18
    Permalost's Avatar
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    "elbowing the fist" isn't quite the right description. Imagine using a crazy monkey type block where you attempt to block his fist with the elbow point (against straight punch). If it doen't hit quite right, the fist will deflect up the forearm (I prefer to do the deflection rather than trying to stop his fist on my elbow). Another example- against a wide hook/haymaker, turn your lead side towards it and point your elbow, and use your back hand to shield next to your elbow, so the bicep runs into the elbow point. This is my favorite haymaker defense. Downside- only idiots throw punches that you can block like this. I don't train it too much, because I don't spend a lot of time developing techniques against crappy attacks. You can use stonewalling against uppercuts as a tool destruction, too (elbow points/forearms into the fists). Another destruction: against knee strikes, using your elbow point to "block" into their thigh. These kind of techniques don't decide fights, but they have their place.

  9. #19
    Virus's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I know he backtracked into blocking with your elbow, but originally he said "wrist grab", which means catching the punch out of the air like aikido, crapkido ect.

    In my opinion he shouldn't have just gone for a simple "nah I didn't really say that", he should have gone for "we use it to teach basic principles and as a distancing exercise". I guess some people aren't as advanced as others when it comes to martial apologism.

  10. #20

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Homersmyid
    Hello, I found this site via Wikipeida. I know finding a good martial arts school is difficult, so having a site that exposes the majority of schools that are BS is good. I guess the reason for this is most people in life are full of BS, so it makes sense.

    However, from reading the FAQ it seems that there is a pro MMA stance to the community. Especially in regards to effective self defense. I'm just asking because that's the impression I got from the FAQ.

    So that leads to my question. It seems in the area of self defense its either scenarios or full contact MMA stlye geared towards sport. But it would seem best to combine the both, no? Like a full contact competition but with one oppenent armed with a rubber knife and the rule that if you get stabbed you lose, It wouldn't be a fair fight, but it would be great training it seems. Any such thing exist?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interna..._Confederation

    That's the best martial art for real self defense.

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