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  1. #1

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    ? Kung Fu – San Da ?

    What is the relationship (aside from Chinese origins) between Kung Fu and San Da?

    Usually when I hear one mentioned the other is mentioned as well. It also appears to be a natural progression for a lot of people to cross train in one after being involved in the other.

    I recently went for a free lesson at a San Da gym. The head coach said that he is “an old Kung Fu guy”.

    If someone could take the time to explain this I would really appreciate your time.

    Thanks.


    Edited - Font Fixed, Sorry
    Last edited by AMH; 9/25/2007 1:28pm at .

  2. #2
    It is Fake's Avatar
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    I'll find the links. We have defined it here.

    Basically Sanda and Sanshou are a rule set for fighting. You practice a style of kung fu and you use it in SanDa.

    Cullion practice Tai Chi and uses it in SanDa. Now somewhere along the line it has morphed into a style supposedly of its own.

    Now, this is my opinion.

    Oh and chill with the font okay.

  3. #3

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    From what I understand, San Da is the ring sport of kung fu. Heavy gloves tyhings of that sort. Kind of like chinese kickboxing with throws. Please correct me if i stated that incorrectly.

  4. #4
    ChickenBeakFist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AMH
    What is the relationship (aside from Chinese origins) between Kung Fu and San Da?

    Usually when I hear one mentioned the other is mentioned as well. It also appears to be a natural progression for a lot of people to cross train in one after being involved in the other.

    I recently went for a free lesson at a San Da gym. The head coach said that he is “an old Kung Fu guy”.

    If someone could take the time to explain this I would really appreciate your time.

    Thanks.
    http://www.marknegron.com/sanda.asp

    It's basically a rule set. Any style can compete. Some places in the US are selling it as a style to try to escape the "Kung Fu" stigma in NHB circles. That link explains it a little better. Enjoy!

  5. #5

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    Usually when I hear one mentioned the other is mentioned as well. It also appears to be a natural progression for a lot of people to cross train in one after being involved in the other.
    I'm just starting to do San Da at the moment, and it could b seen as a natural progression of cross training, because i know that i wouldn't be allowed to learn it without having a solid base of training first, and that i try and incorporate the tai chi i've learned into it, mostly with the locks and throws

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by tatsu84
    i wouldn't be allowed to learn it without having a solid base of training first,
    This is my concern for myself.

    My background is Ninjutsu. (Go head, start flaming. Its okay, I have tuff skin) I studied it for about 2 years in my late teens early 20’s. This was about 10 years ago now. Since then I have dappled with military combative (I am prior service, US Army) and for the last month I have been training in Goju Karate.

    Like I said, I have recently gone to a free San Da class. It is actually an MMA gym http://www.lawtonmma.com. The standing work is San Da and the ground work is BJJ, Judo, and submission wrestling.

    So these are my new questions.

    “Is my limited MA background enough for me to start San Da?”
    “Am I getting in over my head?”
    and finally

    “Should I stick with a TMA for a while before going to San Da at this gym?”

    You time and opinions are appreciated. Thanks!
    Last edited by It is Fake; 9/26/2007 12:24pm at . Reason: Font and size.

  7. #7
    Scott Larson's Avatar
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    Muay Boran -> Muay Thai

    Kung fu -> San da

  8. #8
    It is Fake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AMH
    This is my concern for myself.

    My background is Ninjutsu. (Go head, start flaming. Its okay, I have tuff skin) I studied it for about 2 years in my late teens early 20’s. This was about 10 years ago now. Since then I have dappled with military combative (I am prior service, US Army) and for the last month I have been training in Goju Karate.

    Like I said, I have recently gone to a free San Da class. It is actually an MMA gym http://www.lawtonmma.com. The standing work is San Da and the ground work is BJJ, Judo, and submission wrestling.

    So these are my new questions.

    “Is my limited MA background enough for me to start San Da?”
    “Am I getting in over my head?”
    and finally

    “Should I stick with a TMA for a while before going to San Da at this gym?”

    You time and opinions are appreciated. Thanks!
    Ross is supposed to be a good teacher. So, if he is affiliated with these guys in anway that is a plus.

    Most martial arts make you start over anyway. If you are going in with an "I already Trained" attitude you need to lose it. Everyone started with nothing at some point. That is what learning is about. You start with nothing and try to go somewhere to gain more knowledge.

    Realize you are low man on the totem pool and train. Tatsu is wrong, It has nothing to do with a solid base. If that was the case many schools wouldn't exist. All a solid base may do is get you into Sanda sparring quicker than someone untrained.

    Again it is a rule set. What Hui Xui types is wrong. A good Kung fu school teaches the art and Sanda side by side. They should be equal not one begat the other. Now, that is what people are trying to say as CBF posted.

  9. #9
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    I learn the san da side by side with the kung fu, rather than just putting on gear and trying to smash each other with sao choi. The san da and kung fu sometimes contradict each other in details of form. For example, our standup is almost straight boxing with kicks. We raise our shoulers and tuck our chin in san da punching, but in kung fu forms we keep the shoulders down and spine relatively upright. The kung fu base is useful in some ways because when learning various throws they are related to movements in forms, but some people insist on making it look like stylized forms (another example: I've seen kung fu people try to do a head and arm throw from a low horse stance rather than putting the feet close together). Like IIF said, its best to go in with the attitude that you're starting over learning something new. Later on, when you have a solid background in each, you start drawing the lines between them.

  10. #10
    Jadonblade's Avatar
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    I was told that back in the old days when the "masters" kept on challenging each other, their was alot of deaths or unneccesary injuries. As a consequence san da was born so that the knowledge could be preserved without all the good fighters killing each other. The next step is to fully acknowledge groundwork I think. I often got frustrated when I was weakly thrown and having to restart, when I would of been happy fighting on the ground. Or even after throwing someone and having to leave it at that.

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