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  1. #1

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    Is Hapkido a good martial art ?

    I have been doing muay thai for three and a half years,i have looked into other martial arts like BJJ (i tried but i did not like it very much) and baji but i could not find any school around here, i looked into kenpo but walked away from the school when i saw that they had seventeen year old black belts that got their belts in barely a year or two (www.DPKEMPO.com see it to believe it) I have been very satisfied with muay thai it has been useful on more than one occasion but i would love to try something different just for a change,recently i have been doing some research on hapkido, it looked pretty good (besides the overly flashy kicks) the grappling and takedowns as well as the joint locks all looked pretty effective,but i wanted to read your opinions on the martial art as well.

  2. #2

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    Many people on here would have you believe it is a useless martial art, but infact it can very effective in many fighting situations. I've spoken to many people who have trained in this particular style, and they really seem to enjoy it. It does have overly flashy kicks, but those are found in almost any martial art. It not only features joint locks, striking, grappling, and takedowns, but it also has pressure points involved as well.
    I added that last one because I've found that pressure points can be quite effective in tight situations. My brother studies Ninjutsu, and I study Muay Thai and BJJ (and Karate soon) and also took a few classes of Hapkido, and when I do takedowns, and holds on him, he always uses a few good pressure points to make me let go, or back off.
    Largely it is a streetwise, and fun martial art, which because of it's broad span of techniques, can be carries into your life for many years. As you grow old, the techniques that you and I have learned in Muay Thai will slowly begin to leave our ability to preform easily, and we will be left far weaker than we were before. Many of the techniques of hapkido could still be used for a long time into your years, and there is always plenty to learn from it. Just make sure that the school you attend is a suitable one.

  3. #3

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    Hi, I study and teach Hapkido in New Zealand. "Hapkido" is a generic name like "karate" so anybody can set themselves up as a "Hapkido" instructor and teach whatever they like. So there are a lot of "styles" of Hapkido out there. We don't teach the "fancy kicks" but a lot of other Hapkido "styles" do. I guess you need to shop around and judge for yourself.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Callum Forbes
    Hi, I study and teach Hapkido in New Zealand. "Hapkido" is a generic name like "karate" so anybody can set themselves up as a "Hapkido" instructor and teach whatever they like. So there are a lot of "styles" of Hapkido out there. We don't teach the "fancy kicks" but a lot of other Hapkido "styles" do. I guess you need to shop around and judge for yourself.
    I am a little confused, could you give a little more detail as to how Hapkido is a generic name like Karate, which unknown to me is a generic name ?

    I am slightly confused by this statement.

  5. #5

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    I study and teach a traditional system of Hapkido, and would say to you that Callum is correct about shopping around. There are a lot of pretenders that say they do Hapkido....I think that may be what he means by Hapkido becoming generic. A lot of us who do the real thing resent this sad fact. Many are actually tae kwon do people that have learned a few (BAAAAAD) wrist techniques (or Son Mok Sool, in Korean) and start calling themselves Hapkido.

    To identify solid Hapkido, look for people who can REALLY do breakfalls - an air-roll is often the only way to avoid injury from a well-executed Hapkido self-defense technique, and real Hapkido people start learning to fall at white belt. Look for small circle motion...big circle techniques look great in pictures and CAN hurt, but small circle techniques DO hurt. Look for people tapping in pain because they obviously mean it (if you're tapping and smiling, then it don't freakin' hurt -- so guess what? It don't freakin' work!!). Look for circular and stomping kicks to the knees and ankles...many if not all of DoJuNim Ji Han-jae's kicks were designed to be executed in street shoes with hard soles.

    Just a few quick things to note. Hope it helps.

  6. #6

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    Yudan6 is correct in understanding my earlier statement. When the name Hapkido was originally coined, the founders of the style did not register or copyright the name. So anybody can set themselves up as a "Hapkido" instructor and teach whatever they like. Ditto for Karate.

    So we see some TKD instructors for example adding in a few arm bars on top of their syllabus and calling it Hapkido.

    Sounds like I study and teach a style of Hapkido very similar to Yudan6's and one of the reasons why I joined this forum was because I was sick of Hapkido getting a bad rap because of the people out there who have taken our name but are not actually teaching what I consider to be Hapkido.

  7. #7
    kwoww's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    So post a video and prove us wrong.

  8. #8
    DerAuslander's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by rooseveltdon
    I have been doing muay thai for three and a half years,i have looked into other martial arts like BJJ (i tried but i did not like it very much) and baji but i could not find any school around here, i looked into kenpo but walked away from the school when i saw that they had seventeen year old black belts that got their belts in barely a year or two (www.DPKEMPO.com see it to believe it) I have been very satisfied with muay thai it has been useful on more than one occasion but i would love to try something different just for a change,recently i have been doing some research on hapkido, it looked pretty good (besides the overly flashy kicks) the grappling and takedowns as well as the joint locks all looked pretty effective,but i wanted to read your opinions on the martial art as well.
    Check the school.

    If you spar under Pro-Hapkido or MMA rules, then it's good.

    If they spend the majority of their time grabbing each other's wrist...then don't waste your time.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ResidentSamurai
    Many people on here would have you believe it is a useless martial art, but infact it can very effective in many fighting situations. I've spoken to many people who have trained in this particular style, and they really seem to enjoy it. It does have overly flashy kicks, but those are found in almost any martial art. It not only features joint locks, striking, grappling, and takedowns, but it also has pressure points involved as well.
    I added that last one because I've found that pressure points can be quite effective in tight situations. My brother studies Ninjutsu, and I study Muay Thai and BJJ (and Karate soon) and also took a few classes of Hapkido, and when I do takedowns, and holds on him, he always uses a few good pressure points to make me let go, or back off.
    Largely it is a streetwise, and fun martial art, which because of it's broad span of techniques, can be carries into your life for many years. As you grow old, the techniques that you and I have learned in Muay Thai will slowly begin to leave our ability to preform easily, and we will be left far weaker than we were before. Many of the techniques of hapkido could still be used for a long time into your years, and there is always plenty to learn from it. Just make sure that the school you attend is a suitable one.
    The lessons I liked were the early intro to wrist/ joint manipulation, even though some seemed to be the weakness of the style since they start in a standing position, but the concept of bending the wrist, elbow, or the standing armbars I've always kept in the back of my mind. I've always thought that if you mix in a bit of BJJ and a lot of pro boxing, you 'd have something sweet to build up from. Imagine a Hapkido person who could box like Roy Jones Jr.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nK8qHnvBo9U
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7fgUp7W-MU

  10. #10

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    i trained in hapkido for many years.. just because the kicks look fancy does not mean they dont work.. all the submissions i learned in hapkido were the same ones i learned in any bjj and submissions class i have ever taken.. ihave been in martial arts for 25 years ..the self defense is one of the best there is.. the problem is that because it has so much to learn it takes years to master this art.. to many people look at arts like this and think their phony.....these are people that realy dont know martial arts ..

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