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  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    73
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have gotten in trouble trying to punch too far through in sparring. I've been working on that Jack Dempsey falling straight lead and I've gotten good power with it. But if you miss with a fully extended punch when you are aiming for the back of someone's head you are fucked. Perhaps even more so if they parry.

    Case in point, my sparring partner parries that long range penetrating jab sometimes and because I am so focused on putting it through him my arm is tense when he catches it. Guess what he does then? Corkscrews his parry so my arm is down and slightly past him with my face wide open for a counter.

    I like White Shark's observation. You need to penetrate but if you go too far with it you really lose your ability to retract your arm. And bobyclumsyninja had an excellent point as well, because most of the power comes from the legs and body being behind the punch, but the arms should only be tense for a moment in time. But you have to tense on contact to save your wrist, and if you are still tense as you drive your wrist the additional 10 or so inches to the back of their skull IMO you are over committed.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Bay Area
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    1,034
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I say six inches indtead of two inches nut that might be overly scientific.
    remember to tighten up on impact to get your power from the ground into it. and to loosen up after for a faster return for defense.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    1,437
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I had a teacher divide strikes into three types:

    1) Swing through.
    2) Hit and retract.
    3) Dead hand.

    You penetrate with all of them but they're used differently. Swinging through means you follow a path through the target back to your guard without retracing your path (but not in a big circle, either, obviously). It's what you use for hooks and uppercuts as well as more exotic things like standing hammerfists. Hitting and retracting is your typical shot. Dead hand is when you let the strike stop for a bit to transfer more energy and cause physical displacement of the target. It's obviously not something you want to do all the time and you will tend to push with it, but then again getting the guy to move is often on your agenda when you're doing it. But I find it hard to do and obviously, the bit of time it takes makes it more marginal than the other two.

  4. #24
    WhiteShark's Avatar
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    Sep 2003
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    Atlanta GA
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    9,167
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Don't any of you guys know what a "rule of thumb" is? I never meant 2" as the absolute be all end all depth of striking.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_thumb

    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/rule_of_thumb

  5. #25

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Washington, D.C.
    Posts
    638
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WestonE123
    I have gotten in trouble trying to punch too far through in sparring. I've been working on that Jack Dempsey falling straight lead and I've gotten good power with it. But if you miss with a fully extended punch when you are aiming for the back of someone's head you are fucked. Perhaps even more so if they parry.

    Case in point, my sparring partner parries that long range penetrating jab sometimes and because I am so focused on putting it through him my arm is tense when he catches it. Guess what he does then? Corkscrews his parry so my arm is down and slightly past him with my face wide open for a counter.

    I like White Shark's observation. You need to penetrate but if you go too far with it you really lose your ability to retract your arm. And bobyclumsyninja had an excellent point as well, because most of the power comes from the legs and body being behind the punch, but the arms should only be tense for a moment in time. But you have to tense on contact to save your wrist, and if you are still tense as you drive your wrist the additional 10 or so inches to the back of their skull IMO you are over committed.
    I'm willing to bet that the problem is not with your "extension" but your balance. If you are doing a falling step with full extension, but having trouble getting back to position, its more likely due to your weight distribution than your merely extending your arm fully.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Elk Grove, CA
    Posts
    66
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here's something that hasn't been brought up yet.
    In my school we use the "hit don't push" mentality. We snap our punches and kicks back quickly because it allows the power of the strike to flow through their body, which causes more pain, and has a better chance of stunning them if you hit hard enough.
    When you push through, your strike is muffled, and the vibrations don't carry. Think about when you play drums or any percussion instrument. You don't hit the surface and let the drumstick stay there, you let the stick bounce.

    Also, when you bring your hand back quickly, your opponent has less time to grab your arm for a takedown or standing armbar.

  7. #27

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    Jun 2004
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    Bay Area
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark
    Don't any of you guys know what a "rule of thumb" is? I never meant 2" as the absolute be all end all depth of striking.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_thumb

    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/rule_of_thumb
    I was familiar with the wife beating one not the others.

    But 2 inches just seems a bit shallow
    "Its not important to be strong, its just important not to be weak."

  8. #28
    kwoww's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by falconhunter202
    Here's something that hasn't been brought up yet.
    In my school we use the "hit don't push" mentality. We snap our punches and kicks back quickly because it allows the power of the strike to flow through their body, which causes more pain, and has a better chance of stunning them if you hit hard enough.
    When you push through, your strike is muffled, and the vibrations don't carry. Think about when you play drums or any percussion instrument. You don't hit the surface and let the drumstick stay there, you let the stick bounce.

    Also, when you bring your hand back quickly, your opponent has less time to grab your arm for a takedown or standing armbar.
    True, but unlike with a drumstick, improper snap leads to serious joint issues, lack of power, throwing yourself off balance, or any combination thereof.

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