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  1. Jack Rusher is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/02/2007 11:00pm


     Style: ti da shuai na

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by dbozman
    In the yoga world, Ashtanga is the "macho" style for lack of a better term. I've done it a bit and it's quite difficult and physically challenging.
    I've been doing Ashtanga for something like ten months now, three times a week with a class for the first six or seven months and now every morning by myself. It's awesome for working out (both strength and flexibility) all the little muscles that one doesn't normally notice until they get torn. Some of the ab work from pilates is also pretty great.

    I can't comment on the Yoga For Fighters video, but Marcelo Garcia has nice things to say about Ginastica Natural, which is a mix of yoga, gymnastics, and BJJ. The guy who developed it, Alvaro Romano, is a sports science guy with a black belt from Rolls Gracie. Here's a video of Fabio Gurgel doing some:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HDG8HacqGx4
  2. KaneElson is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/02/2007 11:24pm


     Style: Peace

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Offtopic: O_O the thumbnail for tha video looks like that creature from resident evil.
  3. Jhemsley is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/03/2007 2:22pm


     Style: Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I use a few of the Gaim videos and the Yoga for Dummies book for background information. I stick to the basic and beginner stuff and go really slow. The Gaim videos are the most widely sold, Target and Walmart carry them, and they are very well regarded by most of the Yoga websites I've found - a rare case where mass merchandising and sales meet. None of the postures in the begnner level (AM / PM Yoga, Yoga for Beginners II, etc.) are that complicated. All of the postures are things you wouldn't be suprised to see in a High School gym class. The difference between Yoga and just strechting is related to the meditation, breathing and sequencing. Yoga isn't a string of unconnected streches, every postures, called Asana, performed is to be followed with another asana that complements that last one. As a result, they are linked together in a very holistic manner into an entire series, usually referred to as a routine.

    I recommend videos over books for this reason. Its easier to follow a video for a routine than it is a book, or to design one from a book. I would definitely buy a beginner Yoga book eventually, it clarifies some of the concepts and explain why certain things are done certain ways. It also will clarifiy the exact postitioning and pitfalls of certain postitions.

    I don't do any complex moves, everything is pretty basic. According to most literature I've read, the vast majority of postures that create injury are intermediate to advanced postures, frequently even in experienced and limber participants who aren't quite as ready for them as they think they are.

    If you have the time, do a class. My practice is restricted to early morning hours, so I use vidoes and books out of necessity.

    As far as styles, from what I've researched, if all you are after is flexibility, the Iyengar style is probably a better starting place than Ashtanga. It focuses more on exact positioning and uses props (mainly a Yoga strap and Yoga bricks) to allow people without above average flexibility to get into the proper position without hurting themselves (many poses don't really do anything without props for those who aren't flexible already). The downside is some Iyengar schools trend toward mysticism, almost to the point that its taught as quasi-religious spiritual rite as traditionally practiced in India, as oppossed to the excercise oriented Westernized practice I'd say most people on this site require. The poses tend to be static - generally a pose is entered and held, released with a short recovery, then the next pose is started. Most of the beginner Gaim videos are based on Iyengar style Yoga, although they have some that are more derivative of Ashtanga.

    Ashtanga Yoga inovolves a lot of dynamic poses - flowing from one to another in a fairly fluid form. Its much better for burning calories and developing strength, but a frequent criticism is beginners have a hard time keeping up while learning the correct postures, and as a result it takes longer to develop flexibility. Since most people ont he forum probably are getting a good workout from BJJ, I'd advise picking a Iyengar class over Ashtanga, since most people in BJJ probably are more interested in Yoga for flexibility than for strength and cardio.

    Virtually all long time Yoga practitioners doe some combination of the two styles, although there are many other styles. Virtually all yoga classes at a local fitness gym is going to be based on one of the two.
  4. M-Tri is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/03/2007 10:51pm

    supporting member
     Style: Mixed Martial Arts

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I did hot yoga a couple times and it was awesome. I haven't looked into specific yoga for fighting though
  5. MartialArtN00b is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/03/2007 10:55pm


     Style: bjj

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ive hopped through several yoga teachers. Ive ended up doing yoga concurrently with bjj. Though ive started yoga a couple of months later than i did bjj. In the end if i never did yoga, my bjj would drastically be different for the worse.

    Dont know about videos. Its simpler to do it in a class. I do some flow sets when im home, and i try to go to yoga class at least once a week.

    Theres a point where yoga becomes its own thing and doesnt bring anything more to jiujitsu.

    As to hurting yourself in yoga... Dont get into poses youre not going to end up using in bjj. Its going to keep your life simple and you wont get hurt.

    Back bending, rabbit pose, camel pose, etc... are not that useful. And if you got to follow the class, do the variation that has the least backbending.

    Spinal flexibility is something to take at a ridiculously slow pace.

    Do it properly and save the trip to a quack chiropractor.

    Yoga will mesh with bjj, so NOT having the habit of backbending or twisting your spine will save you some stupid crazy hurt in jitz class.

    Yoga is like Bjj, theres concepts and principles behind the posture/technique. Going through a posture is like learning the triangle. Theres a bit more to it...

    So follow proper classes.
  6. WorldWarCheese is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/04/2007 1:42am


     Style: Muay Thai n00b

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by MartialArtN00b
    Ive hopped through several yoga teachers. Ive ended up doing yoga concurrently with bjj. Though ive started yoga a couple of months later than i did bjj. In the end if i never did yoga, my bjj would drastically be different for the worse.

    Dont know about videos. Its simpler to do it in a class. I do some flow sets when im home, and i try to go to yoga class at least once a week.

    Theres a point where yoga becomes its own thing and doesnt bring anything more to jiujitsu.
    This is something I would like to do, if I can.

    As to hurting yourself in yoga... Dont get into poses youre not going to end up using in bjj. Its going to keep your life simple and you wont get hurt.

    Back bending, rabbit pose, camel pose, etc... are not that useful. And if you got to follow the class, do the variation that has the least backbending.

    Spinal flexibility is something to take at a ridiculously slow pace.
    I learned this the hard way.

    Do it properly and save the trip to a quack chiropractor.
    **** you, my chiro's fucking awsome.:XXbazooka

    Yoga will mesh with bjj, so NOT having the habit of backbending or twisting your spine will save you some stupid crazy hurt in jitz class.

    Yoga is like Bjj, theres concepts and principles behind the posture/technique. Going through a posture is like learning the triangle. Theres a bit more to it...

    So follow proper classes.
    Yes, classes are IMO the most important thing. Learning anything physical, be it Judo, Yoga, Weight Lifting or even Rugby really have to be done with a professional and not from some tape or book first.
  7. Jhemsley is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/04/2007 3:59am


     Style: Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yes, classes are IMO the most important thing. Learning anything physical, be it Judo, Yoga, Weight Lifting or even Rugby really have to be done with a professional and not from some tape or book first.
    If you have the time, the classes are the best option, if its an option.

    With Yoga, I don't think its necessary to see enough results to justify the time and effort while being safe. I certainly would do better with a class, but since its an impossibility, I think the videos and books are a much better option than not doing it.
  8. fedeykin is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/04/2007 6:41am


     Style: Dead Lemur Style

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ----------. There are also a number of yoga style which claim to have various spiritual or mystical claims.------------


    i guess that would come from the fact that the word yoga literaly translates into "connection with god" but hey.. who would of thought that yoga is actualy a spiritual practice that incorporates physical training?
    Last edited by fedeykin; 9/04/2007 6:46am at .
  9. WorldWarCheese is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/04/2007 10:39am


     Style: Muay Thai n00b

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Jhemsley
    If you have the time, the classes are the best option, if its an option.

    With Yoga, I don't think its necessary to see enough results to justify the time and effort while being safe. I certainly would do better with a class, but since its an impossibility, I think the videos and books are a much better option than not doing it.
    I can't agree. Granted there is the option of taking it easy on the spinal work, but even with everything, you're still pulling and twisting things more than they're used to. Without someone who knows what they're doing and what you're doing there to guide you I say you're courting injuries or future pains and aches that would not benefit your health or training in any way.

    I was injured WITH a teacher, and it took me off Judo for a half a month. I just don't see the potential benefits outweighing the potential injuries when you're trying to video-learn Yoga.

    There's a right way and a wrong way with doing everything. Would you really tell someone who's just done Yoga to learn Guard-work from a Gracie Book or a DVD?
  10. WorldWarCheese is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/04/2007 10:40am


     Style: Muay Thai n00b

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by fedeykin
    ----------. There are also a number of yoga style which claim to have various spiritual or mystical claims.------------


    i guess that would come from the fact that the word yoga literaly translates into "connection with god" but hey.. who would of thought that yoga is actualy a spiritual practice that incorporates physical training?
    The potential spirituality of Yoga is pretty irrelevant to the discussion...
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