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  1. jasculs is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2007 9:31pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    17 Tips On Training Without an Instructor or Even With One

    17 Tips On Training Without An Instructor or Even With One.
    Author: Jason Scully
    www.GrapplersGuide.com

    For some people they have the perfect situation. They are trained by a black belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, a former Muay Thai competitor, former collegiate wrestler or judo champions are teaching them takedowns and they have the time to train outside of class.

    For others thatís not the case they donít have that situation or they canít afford to train at a regular academy, but they still love the sport and want to train all the time and improve. Here is a list of things to do to help you improve in grappling and mixed martial arts if you donít have the ideal training situation. Here are some things that will help you stay focused and improve when you donít have an instructor or a school to train at.
    • Buy books, instructional videos, and check out the internet. Fortunately for us there is an extensive amount of material on the different martial arts of mixed martial arts, so you're not completely left out in the dust.
    • Do your best to find someone who is as interested in the sport as much as you are and wants to train just as hard as you. This is obviously really important. I'm sorry to say, but without a training partner your progress is going to be severely lacking.
    • Constantly drill the moves you have learned through your resources over and over. This should even be the case with people who train at a good academy
    • If you are the best one in the group. Many times put yourself in uncomfortable situations so you can improve on them. If youíre bad at escaping triangles (even though it may not happen a lot). Then let your partner triangle you (with out them knowing)
    • Always teach your partners the techniques that work for you best and tell them to look out for them. This is one of the most important tips, because it makes everyone better. Your partner learns how to defend them, and when he does you now have to do something different. This results in everyone's game improving.
    • If you are better then your partner. Pick one or two things you are going to go for in sparring and let them know about it. Now it will make it much harder for you because they know what's coming, so you may have to react different.
    • Drill, Drill, Drill. I don't mean just the dead pattern drilling. I mean practice the technique with your partner to get familiar with the mechanics then as you go have him/her add some movement so you have to react a little different. Then have them add more movement and resistance. Then when you roll, try to do the technique that you were drilling. To many people think drilling is partnering up with someone and just going through the technique. That is not the case, the best drilling in my opinion is trying it during your sparring/grappling session. That is what builds your timing, experience, and lets you know truly what will work for you. When you do this, try to execute that particular technique during your sparring/grappling sessions for at least 2 weeks, by then you should know if you should add it to your arsenal or not.
    • Do conditioning out outside of your training sessions. As they say, ďConditioning is the strongest holdĒ. I'm not sure who first said this statement, but I agree with it 100%. If you are not conditioned you will never be on top. When you get tired and fatigued, your mind doesn't work as fast and your reaction time is greatly hindered.
    • Don't skimp on the sparring. Just like you need to drill a lot, the same goes with sparring. Sparring is where you see what works and what doesn't. It's what tells you what you need work on and what techniques are actually working for you.
    • Have a game plan. When you go to train you need to have a game plan. Know what it is each training session you want to work on and work on it. This way you donĎt go in there and sit around thinking hey what should I work on today. If you do have an instructor and he teaches the class you still should have a game plan for your sparring/rolling session. The goal is to always learn and improve.
    • Training isn't a competition. Too many people don't know what it means to not want to win during a sparring/grappling session. They are always looking to be the best and get ahead. While it is not a bad thing to want to win. It is bad to always want to win in training. These are the people who don't improve and they have no clue why. There are times during your training week that you should dedicate to competition type sparring/grappling. If you train four days a week, then at least three of those days should be dedicated to 100% learning and the other should be a more intense training session.
    • Always go to other places to train, and try to train/spar/grapple with different people. This is especially important for the people who don't have access to an instructor or better training. While you may do well with your training partners, you may not do well with others. It will also keep your mind healthy when you're the one learning new ideas from new people.
    • Always keep a positive mindset. Remember youíre on the mat and doing something about it, while someone else is home, sitting on their couch and wishing they were even close to where you are now.
    • Don't be afraid to give up positions and go for stuff in training. That is the time you need to mess up. If your afraid of messing up in training and don't take any chances, you are going to slow your improvement down a lot.
    • Your imagination is one of the greatest tools you can ever have. If you have an imagination then you always have an option. The reason I say this is because you will always be able to come up with some idea on what to do in any situation. Even if it is a situation you've never experienced before. If you see something hanging out there and you think you can do something with it, then try it. Your not going to get anywhere by just thinking about it. If you think about it, all of the new techniques that have come along and even the development of all martial arts was developed first through someone's imagination. Never be afraid to be creative. When you are imaginative and you can make things happen, that is when your opponent will not know what to do with you.
    • Always try to meet new people who are interested in grappling/mma. This way you can build up the amount of training partners you have. Go on internet sites and try to meet people who are in your area who would like to train. Go to schools that are not to far every once in the while and pay their mat fee to train with them for at least the one class.
    • Don't get discouraged if you feel like you're in a rut. Even people who train with the best teams in the world go through ruts. It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with you not having a formal instructor/coach. That is the time you need your imagination most. Like stated before the imagination is important. It keeps you interested and it is one of the greatest teachers.
    If you have the will to learn, nothing can stop you. You will get it done and succeed. Don't give up and make sure you keep training. Many people have started out being self-trained, and training in little clubs and have done well. It is always good to have good instruction, but it is important to always train right when that good instruction is not around at the moment.

    ďOften times the roughest road may be the best way to get where you want to goĒ - Anonymous

    Thanks for reading!
    Jason
    www.GrapplersGuide.com
  2. krazy kaju is offline
    krazy kaju's Avatar

    I'm not witty enough for this custom title.

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    Posted On:
    8/21/2007 11:51am


     Style: In Hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Some good stuff.
  3. M-Tri is offline
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    Pseudo-Scrambler Extraordinaire

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    Posted On:
    8/23/2007 2:03am

    supporting member
     Style: Mixed Martial Arts

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've been down that road, and I agree with a lot of what you say
  4. mad_malk is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/04/2007 9:01pm


     Style: Krav Maga/ Judo noob

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have to askthis. How many dodjo's are willing to allow some walkin just roll with them? I want to pick up my ground game but alas with my new insta family money for training is very sparse. training with one other person is where i'm going to be at if i can find a partner.
  5. Sh0t is offline
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    Martial and Sexual Artist

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    Posted On:
    9/16/2007 9:09pm

    supporting member
     Style: standup to ground

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    IF you have no partner or gym, spend half your time working on your conditioning. With high level conditioning, you can make up a lot of time not spent doing technique work or sparring.

    To mad_malk: not very likely. Most BJJ/MMA gyms have pretty significant monthly fees, etc. Some have day passes and the likely, but that has not been common in my experience. Outside of coming in for a free "introduction", I'd say very unlikely
  6. Donkey_Fizzle is offline

    Using Donkey Guard to Sniffz Your Feetz

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    Posted On:
    9/16/2007 9:40pm


     Style: Kick Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    #18) Keep a positive attitude if you lose. Losing is a learning experience. Analyze what you did wrong and improve apon it. Never take it personaly. As well as don't let wins go to your head. Just because you are on a winning streak doesn't mean you are indestructable.
    Amateur MMA record: 8-3-1
    Pro MMA record: 3-1
    Status: Semi retarded... I mean retired
  7. Necroth is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/17/2007 3:43am


     Style: Vale Tudo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    mad malk: There are some gyms (alot of MMA oriented gyms, actually) that have "Drop-in Mat" fees, ie. drop-in and pay a fee and you can roll for the day. The VT gym I go to runs 50$ a month, trains bjj w/ gi on Mon and Wed, no-gi/gi optional on fri, and MMA (striking and sprawl oritented I understand, though I've yet to trust my knee enough to go to MMA training and see) on Tues and Thurs. So the 50$ is a good price if you can make it every week, at least 2 times a week. But...I am about to switch out to paying drop in fee of 10$ because I only made it 3 times last month and this month isn't looking any better. They're only open 6pm-8pm on any of those nights, and I work overnights (10pm-6am) and pull alot of overtime, plus have family stuff to do, so I've found it hard to get in. check to see if the gym(s) you're interested in have drop-in fees.
  8. Donkey_Fizzle is offline

    Using Donkey Guard to Sniffz Your Feetz

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    Posted On:
    9/17/2007 3:52am


     Style: Kick Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    To add to what Necroth said:

    If you are a competative grappler/MMAist you can usually dodge the drop in fee. I do this a lot with the travel I have to do for work. I'll contact the promoter of the organization I fight in and tell him where I am headed. If he knows of any gyms or fighters in the area he'll either contact them for me or give me their contact info. haven't had to pay a mat fee yet. Second to fighting, I'd have to say that traveling and dropping in on different gyms is the best experience. I have rolled with the guys in my gym so much it has become predictable. I know their styles, they know mine. Working with complete strangers with unknown skill sets, styles, stregnths and weaknesses is about as close as you can come in training to actual competition. Aside from sparring.
    Amateur MMA record: 8-3-1
    Pro MMA record: 3-1
    Status: Semi retarded... I mean retired
  9. Necroth is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/17/2007 3:58am


     Style: Vale Tudo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Good point, I've never been in competition at pro level (well, technically my 0-1 MMA record is "pro" in the sense that I was paid for it...150$ loss, can't beat having 3 months of training paid for), so I didn't know about that perk. As an amateur, though, I did get to spar with alot of gyms locally for free and spent alot of time floating from place-to-place during the season back in the days when I fought.
  10. DDale is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/18/2007 8:28am


     Style: Sub Westling, MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The top tip on ther is this one IMHO.

    "Don't be afraid to give up positions and go for stuff in training. That is the time you need to mess up. If your afraid of messing up in training and don't take any chances, you are going to slow your improvement down a lot."

    I see no end of newbies who are spending all their time trying to avoid being tapped when they get andy kind of top position they are just sitting there afraid to go for something incase they end up underneath again. The more you go for the better you'll get at getting it IMHO.
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