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  1. jpkunoichi is offline

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    1

    Posted On:
    10/13/2010 12:48pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: ninjitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Re: Mark Davis' dojo

    I'd like to offer comment on the inquiry regarding Mark Davis, his dojo, and his teaching; particularly the person advancing the opinion that there is "lots of BS in the beginning classes." Specifically to that point, sometimes one has to reach for the uppermost ledge, but the view from up top is well worth it.
    I experience Mark's teaching as a brilliant set of perfect building blocks. Indeed, the very nature of this style of teaching is immensely gratifying to the soul of the student. That is, the student never experiences the dull patronizing feeling of having everything robotically handed to her, like the lecturer that just reads the power point slide by slide, void of all discourse. Conversely, one is never left with the vacant, dismissive, vaguely insolent feeling of being given something you know is probably useless on its face. Building blocks stimulate student probing, which is by definition, the respectful way to teach. Mark Davis serves up building blocks and warmly, generously invites the student to reach for the next lesson. My advice to the person who has decided that the beginner classes are "lots of BS" would be to just sit and observe that same class, strip away any preconceived notion or expectation, and all the while keep asking yourself, "why did he show that particular movement, that particular way?" Maybe even, why at that point in the session? Asking, "why" is a fundamental part of receiving what Mr. Davis has to teach. Indeed, he'll even tell you that directly.
    As in life, one sees what they are ready to see. To the person I quoted, I hope you consider another look; for folks considering giving Mark's dojo a try, go for it, immerse yourself without agenda, and you are guarenteed to leave with something to ponder, the act of which will be pleasurable on its own.
  2. Soldiermedic is offline
    Soldiermedic's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,168

    Posted On:
    10/13/2010 12:52pm


     Style: bjj/judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by jpkunoichi View Post
    I'd like to offer comment on the inquiry regarding Mark Davis, his dojo, and his teaching; particularly the person advancing the opinion that there is "lots of BS in the beginning classes." Specifically to that point, sometimes one has to reach for the uppermost ledge, but the view from up top is well worth it.
    I experience Mark's teaching as a brilliant set of perfect building blocks. Indeed, the very nature of this style of teaching is immensely gratifying to the soul of the student. That is, the student never experiences the dull patronizing feeling of having everything robotically handed to her, like the lecturer that just reads the power point slide by slide, void of all discourse. Conversely, one is never left with the vacant, dismissive, vaguely insolent feeling of being given something you know is probably useless on its face. Building blocks stimulate student probing, which is by definition, the respectful way to teach. Mark Davis serves up building blocks and warmly, generously invites the student to reach for the next lesson. My advice to the person who has decided that the beginner classes are "lots of BS" would be to just sit and observe that same class, strip away any preconceived notion or expectation, and all the while keep asking yourself, "why did he show that particular movement, that particular way?" Maybe even, why at that point in the session? Asking, "why" is a fundamental part of receiving what Mr. Davis has to teach. Indeed, he'll even tell you that directly.
    As in life, one sees what they are ready to see. To the person I quoted, I hope you consider another look; for folks considering giving Mark's dojo a try, go for it, immerse yourself without agenda, and you are guarenteed to leave with something to ponder, the act of which will be pleasurable on its own.
    Maybe you should use your awesome ninjutsu powers to deduce that this topic hasn't been discussed in 10 months.

    You didn't offer anything new, just the standard booj "the secrets come to those who wait" party line of bullshit.
  3. Hayseed is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    9

    Posted On:
    10/13/2010 2:04pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Something "the booj" could sure use a hell of a lot less of...
  4. Styygens is offline
    Styygens's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    2,171

    Posted On:
    10/13/2010 4:28pm


     Style: BBT/BJJ/CJKD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by jpkunoichi View Post
    I'd like to offer comment on the inquiry regarding Mark Davis, his dojo, and his teaching; particularly the person advancing the opinion that there is "lots of BS in the beginning classes." Specifically to that point, sometimes one has to reach for the uppermost ledge, but the view from up top is well worth it.
    I experience Mark's teaching as a brilliant set of perfect building blocks. Indeed, the very nature of this style of teaching is immensely gratifying to the soul of the student. That is, the student never experiences the dull patronizing feeling of having everything robotically handed to her, like the lecturer that just reads the power point slide by slide, void of all discourse. Conversely, one is never left with the vacant, dismissive, vaguely insolent feeling of being given something you know is probably useless on its face. Building blocks stimulate student probing, which is by definition, the respectful way to teach. Mark Davis serves up building blocks and warmly, generously invites the student to reach for the next lesson. My advice to the person who has decided that the beginner classes are "lots of BS" would be to just sit and observe that same class, strip away any preconceived notion or expectation, and all the while keep asking yourself, "why did he show that particular movement, that particular way?" Maybe even, why at that point in the session? Asking, "why" is a fundamental part of receiving what Mr. Davis has to teach. Indeed, he'll even tell you that directly.
    As in life, one sees what they are ready to see. To the person I quoted, I hope you consider another look; for folks considering giving Mark's dojo a try, go for it, immerse yourself without agenda, and you are guarenteed to leave with something to ponder, the act of which will be pleasurable on its own.
    tl,dr

    Hey, Noob:

    There are a few things you should know before you post. First, learn to use the "Enter" key to create paragraphs so your writing can be read more easily.

    Second, if you're going to defend an art, you should at least learn how to spell it correctly. It's "ninjutsu" not "ninjitsu."

    Third, please learn to write concisely and clearly. KISS -- "Keep it simple, stupid" -- always applies. Busting out the $10 words is unnecessary when $.50 words will do. Use metaphors, such as your bit about the "uppermost ledge", sparingly. The problem for many writers is they use a high-falutin' metaphor in place of a trite generalization. Instead of talking about mountain climbing, you could've said the same thing with, "Dude, I think training there is awesome." What does that really tell me? Nothing, that's what. Use specific, factual examples to make your points.

    Fourth, you should pay attention to the dates for the posts to which you are responding. There's really no good reason to dredge up a thread that hasn't seen active discussion in ten months unless you have critical and new information. "I think training there is awesome," doesn't count unless you can provide some hard facts about that training.

    Fifth, you really ought to post an introductory thread first in Newbietown and tell us a little about yourself and your training background. Failing that, you should've been more explicit about your connection to the school in this post. Telling me training at this school is awesome is useless without some context. If you've been there a week and this is your first martial arts class ever, then your opinion is nearly worthless. If you're the senior student with over a decade with the teacher and have experience in three or four other systems... Then we can ask you some clarifying questions.

    Welcome to Bullshido.
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