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  1. #31

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    2,069
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Necroth
    That said, there are many (I'm sure) children who DO have the drive, determination, and attention span to do MA at any age. And I welcome any MA instructor to take these kids on a case-by-case basis, but having programs for 3 to 5 year olds verily smacks of McDojo belt buying programs. A 3 year old? Punching and kicking? Grappling? Come on.
    There is a huge difference between a 5 year old and a 10 year old. You'll see it as your kids grow up.

    Here in Canada we put kids in skating as early as 3 and hockey at 5 or 6. I see no problem doing the same with legit MA. By 6 or 7 a kid can learn and absorb very well.

    And really, who cares what belt someone else has anyway?
    "Sifu, I"m niether - I'm a fire dragon so don't **** with me!"

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks AK
    Posts
    598
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Askari
    And really, who cares what belt someone else has anyway?
    The average parent of a TKD kiddo who has paid 50+$ per month, 100+$ per belt test, and countless $$ on gear, trips, and the like over the 10 years from age 5 to age 15. They want a Black Belt. That's how McDojos started.

    As I said, I am wary of this. I don't mean to state that NO ONE can handle it, parent or child, just that programs directed at and marketed for 3-5 year olds usually draws a hefty amount of these kinds of parents. Which turns the program into a belt factory. Which is a very bad thing. Bada-boom, bada-bing.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    2,069
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Necroth
    The average parent of a TKD kiddo who has paid 50+$ per month, 100+$ per belt test, and countless $$ on gear, trips, and the like over the 10 years from age 5 to age 15. They want a Black Belt. That's how McDojos started.

    As I said, I am wary of this. I don't mean to state that NO ONE can handle it, parent or child, just that programs directed at and marketed for 3-5 year olds usually draws a hefty amount of these kinds of parents. Which turns the program into a belt factory. Which is a very bad thing. Bada-boom, bada-bing.
    Now we are on the same page.

    Hockey parents that think their kid is the next Wayne Gretzky. Soccer Moms with the next Beckam. Golfers thinking their kid is Tiger Woods and Martial Arts parents that want their kid to be Bruce Lee.

    Yeah, its a problem parents have. Its not unique to Martial Arts. Parents want to give their kids the opportunity to be great.

    Lets rag on parents some more for wanting their kids to succeed at something.

    I just wish more parents would do their research before enrolling their kid in Joe's Karate down the street.
    "Sifu, I"m niether - I'm a fire dragon so don't **** with me!"

  4. #34
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Kismasher - Mr. Dring does have a mat fee and not sure how much. I guarantee you get your monies worth when you go there to train. If you go and think otherwise, they let me know and I will send you a check for reimbursement.
    By the way ....I love your comment under your name "white belt forever". I agree completely with this term for myself. Everyday I am on the training floor I learn something new and realize how much I actually need to learn.

    I would comment on kids programs, but the server on this web page couldn't handle my comments directed to this. I agree with Askari. I also think many of these comments are based without complete knowledge of junior martial arts program. It would be recommended to sit down with a school owner one day and simply gain a better understanding in this area. You will not find a good answer through posting on threads.

  5. #35
    shinbushi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Manhattan Beach, California, United States
    Posts
    897
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by krazy kaju
    Traditional Japanese Jujitsu has no groundfighting or striking at all, just throws and joint locks performed right after the throws, somewhat similar to aikido (but not really, lawlz).
    Ah no.
    From Koryu.com
    Some define jujutsu and similar arts rather narrowly as "unarmed" close combat systems used to defeat or control an enemy who is similarly unarmed. Basic methods of attack include hitting or striking, thrusting or punching, kicking, throwing, pinning or immobilizing, strangling, and joint-locking. Great pains were also taken by the bushi (classic warriors) to develop effective methods of defense, including parrying or blocking strikes, thrusts and kicks, receiving throws or joint-locking techniques (i.e., falling safely and knowing how to "blend" to neutralize a technique's effect), releasing oneself from an enemy's grasp, and changing or shifting one's position to evade or neutralize an attack.

    From a broader point of view, based on the curricula of many of the classical Japanese arts themselves, however, these arts may perhaps be more accurately defined as unarmed methods of dealing with an enemy who was armed, together with methods of using minor weapons such as the jutte (truncheon), tanto (knife), or kakushi buki (hidden weapons), such as the ryofundo kusari (weighted chain) or the bankokuchoki (a type of knuckle-duster), to defeat both armed or unarmed opponents. Furthermore, the term jujutsu was also sometimes used to refer to tactics for infighting used with the warrior's major weapons: ken or tachi (sword), yari (spear), naginata (glaive), and bo (staff).
    real JJJ is extremely varied. You could have anything that looks like judo, to aikido to even karate. It depend on the era, region and purpose. The main thing with jjj is that a strike's (atemi) main purpose is to off-balance an opponent with damage being of secondary importance.

  6. #36
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Weeping Jujutsu

    My instructor 7th Dan Rick Hoadley teaches Weeping Jujutsu in his Taekwondo curriculum, as well as offers this style as a seperate class. He trained under Master Berl Parsons for several years, and the style is quite effective. Using thumb locks and wrist locks, the subject is wept (head tilt off of centerline) to take them off balance, and then is either thrown ot taken to the ground to prevent their other limbs from inflicting damage from a strike or weapon. The 8 basic joint locks taught to Taekwondo students are quite effective, and in the Jujutsu class, one can see the true power of this style possesses. It's not meant to be a fake BJJ or meant to be used in a MMA situation. It is merely a very potent self- defense martial art.

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