230599 Bullies, 3691 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 22
Page 1 of 3 1 23 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. madmagus777 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    louisiana
    Posts
    179

    Posted On:
    3/27/2008 8:00am


     Style: g. barra (blue belt), fma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Ultimate fights expand to include kids

    By MARCUS KABEL, Associated Press Writer 2 minutes ago

    CARTHAGE, Mo. - Ultimate fighting was once the sole domain of burly men who beat each other bloody in anything-goes brawls on pay-per-view TV.
    ADVERTISEMENT

    But the sport often derided as "human cockfighting" is branching out.

    The bare-knuckle fights are now attracting competitors as young as 6 whose parents treat the sport as casually as wrestling, Little League or soccer.

    The changes were evident on a recent evening in southwest Missouri, where a team of several young boys and one girl grappled on gym mats in a converted garage.

    Two members of the group called the "Garage Boys Fight Crew" touched their thin martial-arts gloves in a flash of sportsmanship before beginning a relentless exchange of sucker punches, body blows and swift kicks.

    No blood was shed. And both competitors wore protective gear. But the bout reflected the decidedly younger face of ultimate fighting. The trend alarms medical experts and sports officials who worry that young bodies can't withstand the pounding.

    Tommy Bloomer, father of two of the "Garage Boys," doesn't understand the fuss.

    "We're not training them for dog fighting," said Bloomer, a 34-year-old construction contractor. "As a parent, I'd much rather have my kids here learning how to defend themselves and getting positive reinforcement than out on the streets."

    Bloomer said the sport has evolved since the no-holds-barred days by adding weight classes to better match opponents and banning moves such as strikes to the back of the neck and head, groin kicking and head butting.

    Missouri appears to be the only state in the nation that explicitly allows the youth fights. In many states, it is a misdemeanor for children to participate. A few states have no regulations.

    Supporters of the sport acknowledge that allowing fights between kids sounds brutal at first. But they insist the competitions have plenty of safety rules.

    "It looks violent until you realize this teaches discipline. One of the first rules they learn is that this is not for aggressive behavior outside (the ring)," said Larry Swinehart, a Joplin police officer and father of two boys and the lone girl in the garage group.

    The sport, which is also known as mixed martial arts or cage fighting, has already spread far beyond cable television. Last month, CBS became the first of the Big Four television networks to announce a deal to broadcast primetime fights. The fights have attracted such a wide audience, they are threatening to surpass boxing as the nation's most popular pugilistic sport.

    Hand-to-hand combat is also popping up on the big screen. The film "Never Back Down," described as "The Karate Kid" for the YouTube generation, has taken in almost $17 million in two weeks at the box office. Another current mixed martial arts movie, "Flash Point," an import from Hong Kong, is in limited release.

    Bloomer said the fights are no more dangerous or violent than youth wrestling. He watched as his sons, 11-year-old Skyler and 8-year-old Gage, locked arms and legs and wrestled to the ground with other kids in the garage in Carthage, about 135 miles south of Kansas City.

    The 11 boys and one girl on the team range from 6 to 14 years old and are trained by Rudy Lindsey, a youth wrestling coach and a professional mixed martial arts heavyweight.

    "The kids learn respect and how to defend themselves. It's no more dangerous than any other sport and probably less so than some," Lindsey said.

    Lindsey said the children wear protective headgear, shin guards, groin protection and martial-arts gloves. They fight quick, two-minute bouts. Rules also prohibit any elbow blows and blows to the head when an opponent is on the ground.

    "If they get in trouble or get bad grades, I'll hear about it and they can't come to training," he added.

    In most states, mixed martial arts is overseen by boxing commissions. In Missouri, the Office of Athletics regulates the professional fights but not the amateur events, which include the youth bouts. For amateurs, the regulation is done by sanctioning bodies that have to register with the athletics office.

    The rules are different in Oklahoma, where unauthorized fights are generally a misdemeanor offense. The penalty is a maximum 30 days in jail and a fine up to $1,000.

    Joe Miller, administrator of the Oklahoma Professional Boxing Commission, said youth fights are banned in his state, and he wants it to stay that way.

    "There's too much potential for damage to growing joints," he said.

    Miller said mixed martial arts uses a lot of arm and leg twisting to force opponents into submission. Those moves, he said, pressure joints in a way not found in sanctioned sports like youth boxing or wrestling.

    But Nathan Orand, a martial arts trainer from Tulsa, Okla., said kids are capable of avoiding injuries, especially with watchful referees in the rings. He thinks the sport is bound to grow.

    "I can see their point because when you say 'cage fighting,' that right there just sounds like kids shouldn't be doing it," Orand said.

    "But you still have all the respect that regular martial arts teach you. And it's really the only true way for youth to be able to defend themselves."

    Back in the Carthage garage, Bloomer said parents shouldn't worry about kids becoming aggressive from learning mixed martial arts. He said his older son was picked on by bullies at school repeatedly last year but never fought them, instead reporting the problem to his teachers.

    And fighters including his 8-year-old son get along once a bout is over, Bloomer said.

    "When they get out of the cage, they go back and play video games together. It doesn't matter who won and who lost. They're still little buddies."
  2. ray jackson is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    100

    Posted On:
    3/27/2008 8:50am


     Style: karate, Ju-jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The wrtier started off like sounding like a propagandistic douchebag, but at least it ended with a more positive perspective on kids and MMA. I don't like the idea of kids fighting the way adult practioners do, but with all the protective gear and rules, it really doesn't sound all like a bad thing. I mean, it sounds safer than football and baseball. I remember as a kid hearing about other kids getting hit in the chest while at bat and dying at little league games.
  3. madmagus777 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    louisiana
    Posts
    179

    Posted On:
    3/27/2008 9:36am


     Style: g. barra (blue belt), fma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    personally, i like this idea. i like the safety precautions that are being taken. i look at the younger students at my bjj school and wish i could have started when i was that young. i really hate how this article pushes the tired human cockfighting angle and especially the phrase "burly men who beat each other bloody in anything-goes brawls". but i do appreciate that the writer talked about the safety precautions that were taken and that no one has been seriously hurt.
  4. madmagus777 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    louisiana
    Posts
    179

    Posted On:
    3/27/2008 9:38am


     Style: g. barra (blue belt), fma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    one of the 14 year old students at my bjj school whose was a near prodigy never got hurt doing bjj or mma but got a fractured skull from playing baseball.
  5. jj77 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    south carolina
    Posts
    204

    Posted On:
    3/27/2008 11:24am


     Style: kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My .02c on this is as long as safety is 1st priority, I would be willing to let my son be involved. Playing sports of any kind with a lot of physical contact, football,hockey, soccer and such is no different than MMA. If safety and discipline are in place for the kids and parents involved, it should teach kids how to fight. My early years growing up in Southeast Asia, you learned to fight at a young age or were beaten constantly with no protective gear. The problems I can see with this is keeping the bully kids in check and also dealing with a lot of whiny parents. Giving the kids a chance to learn how to fight at an early age and the understanding of why they are learning this should help them in their daily activities. Might even keep them away from the Mcdojos who really don't teach kids how to defend and fight.
  6. PizDoff is offline

    .

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    18,602

    Posted On:
    3/27/2008 11:47am

    supporting memberstaff
     Style: Grappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here's the vid to go along with it.

    http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/play...26713&src=news
    Surfing Facebook at work? Spread the good word by adding us on Facebook today! https://www.facebook.com/Bullshido
  7. HappyOldGuy is offline
    HappyOldGuy's Avatar

    Slipping coal into stockings with a little sumptin for mom.

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,825

    Posted On:
    3/27/2008 12:11pm


     Style: Rehab Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Call me a left coast *****, but I'm not a fan of anything that gives growing kids lots of head impacts, including boxing for pre teens. Pankration would be cool.
  8. Vorpal is offline
    Vorpal's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    A Hell of my own making
    Posts
    3,078

    Posted On:
    3/27/2008 12:14pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Judo makes the most sense for young kids. It sounds like some dads are living their MMA fantasies out through their kids.
  9. Odacon is offline
    Odacon's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    3,627

    Posted On:
    3/27/2008 12:18pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Bits and pieces

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I stopped reading when he described mma as bare knuckle.
  10. DCS is offline
    DCS's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,056

    Posted On:
    3/27/2008 12:22pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: 柔道

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Carthage delenda est.
Page 1 of 3 1 23 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.