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  1. #81

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    36
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i dont kmow anything about tkd but when you go to class why does it matter what you call people ..i go to class to LEARN..isnt that why we all go? when i heard about the testing fees for belts it made me sick..it is a honer to get a belt and my hapkido teacher taught me it was a honer to give one to a student...there are schools out there that still feel this way..you just have to look very hard for them..peace

  2. #82

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    398
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by probeast1
    i dont kmow anything about tkd but when you go to class why does it matter what you call people ..i go to class to LEARN..isnt that why we all go? when i heard about the testing fees for belts it made me sick..it is a honer to get a belt and my hapkido teacher taught me it was a honer to give one to a student...there are schools out there that still feel this way..you just have to look very hard for them..peace
    Just curious, why are you in this forum ? Second, what you call people " is merely a sign of respect.

  3. #83

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    36
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    what i was saying is that it shouldnt matter what you call someone because your there to learn..i give respect to every one that deserves it . im on this site because i trained hapkido for 7 years..peace

  4. #84
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    I feel for you man.

    I'll be honest, I absolutely loved TKD. But the main reason that I switched to Muay Thai was simple; I no longer believe that there is such thing as an authentic TKD school. Almost all of them are money hungry posers that are cashing in on people's passions for martial arts. Even alot of the Korean guys that I see seem like all they want to do is make money off of students, not teach real martial arts.
    In the end, I think that it's a shame since TKD has lots of potential, it's just being turned into complete horse ****. In the end, if they make you sign a contract, it's not worth it. Any true martial artist understands that it's not moral to force someone into something they don't want. I can understand schools that OFFER contracts as a way to get a reduced monthly rate, but I've learned to avoid mandatory contracts at all costs.
    I know how you feel and my heart goes out to you. I wish you success and hope you can use this negative experience to your advantage, somehow.
    Best of luck.

  5. #85

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Seoul, Korea
    Posts
    29
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sounds like it is time for you to start having the mentality of using them. I mean, you have a place to train and people to spar, so forget about any expectations the master may have - just use that place to train for yourself. You'll get your black belt along the way, and believe me you will regret it down the road if you don't.

  6. #86
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I am new to this forum, but here is my two cents.... I have been out of TKD for a little over ten years, but this was My experience with it.. I started when I was 12 years old, my instructor was a high school art teach by profession, and TKD was his passion... His instructor was a Korean born, and had his school an hour drive away.. My instructor built his dojang on his property, charged 35 dollars a month (ten years ago in a very small town), and 5 years after I started he had to build on to make room for all the students (there were over 100 students, in a town with a population of 2000) We did pay for testing, but the testing fee went to my instructors instructor, and we had to travel to his school to test... there was only one black belt under the age of 16 (he started when he was 5, and at 11 years old he tested and passed for cho-dan). He was held back because no-one was allowed to test for e-dan (2nd degree) until they were 18 years old... Yes we did many shotokan (look alike) forms, and one step sparring as white belts (this seems silly, but the only street fight I was ever in, ended with the very first technique in one-step sparring i learned as a white belt) ... and yes we sparred "light-contact", which if we were to fight another trained fighter that fights full contact we would be at a huge dis-advantage.. What I learned in class was to develope excellent technique and very powerful strikes, and blocks.. To this day, my old school (and the entire organization) does not have contracts, and yes the class is very formal (which requires "sir and ma'am") and yes some of the things taught, may seem silly or useless... and doesnt "harden" a persons fighting ability the way Muay Thai does (I now do MT and I love it, no more, no less than TKD) But also not everyone wants to go to class and full contact spar for 20 rounds and walk funny for a couple days after (like I do)... If you find a good TKD school, it will take 3 or more years to become a decent fighter, because alot of the class time is geared towards other parts of the curriculum than sparring, and the sparring isn't down and dirty realism like in other styles, but you can bet that when the moment is right for a TKD technique in my MT sparring, I let it fly... different people want different things from their training, and there are probably more bad business based schools in TKD than any other style, but it is not the style that has let people down, it is people that have let the style down..

  7. #87

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Amen to that... I share a your views.

  8. #88

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    17
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by zathurious
    I no longer believe that there is such thing as an authentic TKD school. .
    Come to mine, I need more students :viking:
    It's cheap too, except for the plane ticket to Norway...

    I was attending a college in Plano, TX a couple of years ago, and while there looked at some of the tkd schools. I agree there's all sorts of weird stuff going on - a lot of no sir yes sir, and a bunch of people being promoted way past their abilities. I saw 5th dan instructors unable to do a simple jumping turning back kick (twieo momdollyochagi), brown/red belts sticking their tongue out (!) while sparring, and of course the ubiquitous kids flailing around.

    Most schools seemed to emphasize the "family" aspect of the training, rather than the "fighting/self defense" aspect. All fair, as long as people are informed that's what they're getting...

    It's pretty symptomatic that the best tkd guy I met was recently arrived from Mexico - no McDojangs there!

    Hi by the way !

  9. #89

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    10
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have done WTF for slightly more than a year. Quite good for conditioning IMNO (leg strength, flexibility, even cardio).
    I have sparred full-contact, with a guy who had done kickboxing, managed to maintain a large distance, and landed several kicks, managed to stop a few attacks in their tracks with spinning back kicks, avoided their kicks, but as soon as I went in the corner, my partner risked several kicks to the body, I threw a couple of punches, and pressed me in, with no way to escape. He then proceeded to hook and uppercut me, and punching being foreign to me, got me decently owned.

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