228219 Bullies, 4606 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 34
Page 1 of 4 1 234 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. rordogs is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    137

    Posted On:
    7/23/2007 1:50am


     Style: diet

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    lifting weights slooooooowly

    i just started a new program today at my gym and they got me doing weights that are really light but doing them real slowly, like lifting up for 4 seconds then down 6 seconds. my arms got real worn out real fast.
    so just wondering what anyones opinion is on that kinds of lifting?
    btw im 72kg looking to put on a few kg of muscle.
  2. Raining_Blood is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    194

    Posted On:
    7/23/2007 2:31am


     Style: Wrestling, MT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    How new are you to lifting and what movements did they have you doing. From the sound of things you sound new to lifting and they might be trying to teach you the technique involved.

    If this isnt the case it sounds like a HIT or Super Slow type programme. The general opinion on these types of programmes that they arn't that flash especially if you have an athletic apirations. There is a real good thread around here somewhere but Im pressed for time so will have to search for it later.
  3. Cullion is offline
    Cullion's Avatar

    Everybody was Kung Fu fighting

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oxford, UK
    Posts
    6,526

    Posted On:
    7/23/2007 3:54am

    supporting member
     Style: Tai Chi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    IIRC 'super slow' training is a bodybuilding thing where the 'time under tension' means that more fibres are brought into play (as other fibres get progressively exhausted), which supposedly results in increased hypertrophy.
  4. Nid is offline

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,530

    Posted On:
    7/23/2007 6:33am

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "Time under tension" doesn't imply anything other than what it says.

    Bouncing a bar off one's chest a single time could be described has having a low TUT.

    The "slow" part of it, more specifically, the goal of not incurring mechanical assistance by way of momentum is more to the point. I.e. your muscles are doing what they're supposed to be doing without ricocheting weight around with your tendons and ligaments.
    Last edited by Nid; 7/23/2007 6:37am at .
  5. Cullion is offline
    Cullion's Avatar

    Everybody was Kung Fu fighting

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oxford, UK
    Posts
    6,526

    Posted On:
    7/23/2007 6:39am

    supporting member
     Style: Tai Chi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yes it would. The idea with having a longer time under tension is that supposedly more muscle fibres get worked because they have to get recruited to replace the ones getting exhausted.

    I say supposedly because I don't lift like this.
    This is simply my understanding of the theory bodybuilders who are into very slow lifting are working to.
    !!RENT SPACE HERE FOR 10 VBUCKS PER LINE PER MONTH!!

    !! PM ME FOR SPEEDY SERVICE !!

    Sponsored by our first customer: Repulsive Monkey



    I <3 Sirc.
  6. Cullion is offline
    Cullion's Avatar

    Everybody was Kung Fu fighting

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oxford, UK
    Posts
    6,526

    Posted On:
    7/23/2007 6:41am

    supporting member
     Style: Tai Chi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Correction: I did try this once with a relatively light weight whilst benching. It was very tiring and I had more soreness in the muscles worked 36 hours later than I had when benching for the same reps at my normal pace but with a much heavier weight.

    No, I don't think 'soreness' equates to 'goodness', just something I noticed. I'm not training for pec hypertrophy because my sell-by date as a male stripper is long past.
    !!RENT SPACE HERE FOR 10 VBUCKS PER LINE PER MONTH!!

    !! PM ME FOR SPEEDY SERVICE !!

    Sponsored by our first customer: Repulsive Monkey



    I <3 Sirc.
  7. Teh El Macho is offline
    Teh El Macho's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Porcupine/Hollywood, FL & Parmistan via Elbonia
    Posts
    11,762

    Posted On:
    7/23/2007 7:44am

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cullion
    Correction: I did try this once with a relatively light weight whilst benching. It was very tiring and I had more soreness in the muscles worked 36 hours later than I had when benching for the same reps at my normal pace but with a much heavier weight.

    No, I don't think 'soreness' equates to 'goodness', just something I noticed. I'm not training for pec hypertrophy because my sell-by date as a male stripper is long past.
    Remember this golden rule: men are like wine. :evil4:

    Quote Originally Posted by Kein Haar
    "Time under tension" doesn't imply anything other than what it says.

    Bouncing a bar off one's chest a single time could be described has having a low TUT.

    The "slow" part of it, more specifically, the goal of not incurring mechanical assistance by way of momentum is more to the point. I.e. your muscles are doing what they're supposed to be doing without ricocheting weight around with your tendons and ligaments.
    Correctamundo. At some point, however, the trainers will need to switch the OP to a faster lift to train the ligaments for it. The most efficient way IMO of doing slow-mo lifts is on the eccentric part of the lift.
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  8. Cullion is offline
    Cullion's Avatar

    Everybody was Kung Fu fighting

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oxford, UK
    Posts
    6,526

    Posted On:
    7/23/2007 7:51am

    supporting member
     Style: Tai Chi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Kein Haar
    The "slow" part of it, more specifically, the goal of not incurring mechanical assistance by way of momentum is more to the point. I.e. your muscles are doing what they're supposed to be doing without ricocheting weight around with your tendons and ligaments.
    Gotcha. Is there any truth to the 'more fibres worked as they replace fatigued ones' theory?
    !!RENT SPACE HERE FOR 10 VBUCKS PER LINE PER MONTH!!

    !! PM ME FOR SPEEDY SERVICE !!

    Sponsored by our first customer: Repulsive Monkey



    I <3 Sirc.
  9. Nid is offline

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,530

    Posted On:
    7/23/2007 10:34am

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There's that sweet spot wherein:

    You're making meaningful inroads (% of muscle fiber exhaustion) without the unnecessary time spent re-using spent muscle fibers which have been given the chance to recuperate and fire off again. That'd be weight which is too light.

    On the other hand, you don't want it so heavy whereby the only inroads you're making are in regard to the handful of types devoted towards an athletic heave.

    So there's that, but also the safety consideration. I have nothing against lifting "heavy" weight, provided it's done with control. When one puts a given weight on the bench press bar (let's say 100 pounds), it stands to reason that you are consciously aware that you will be subjecting your tissues to that equivalent force once gravity kicks in against you. The problem with the rapid crap is that the more rapidly one changes the velocity (bounce, jerk, cheat etc), the more you're deviating from the force *you're aware of*. 100 pounds traveling at a constant velocity, we know, is still 100 pounds. 100 pounds dropping and bouncing is somewhere in excess of that....but where? There no way to know. The only way to know the forces you're both lifting and subjecting yourself to is with a constant velocity. Whatever that time frame may be. Practically speaking we're talking about a 6 second rep. 4 is pushing it.
  10. Nid is offline

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,530

    Posted On:
    7/23/2007 10:39am

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ...train the ligaments for it.
    I would posit the ligaments are so devoid of metabolic activity, there can only be heartbreak and disaster from trying to compromise them for the sake of meaningful growth. Growth which would take FOREVER if compromised like muscles are. Muscles are hot and bloody....they're meant to grow and change in short order.

    I would take for granted that ligaments are gonna do what they're gonna do with safe and proper strength training protocol.
Page 1 of 4 1 234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.