223968 Bullies, 4161 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 11 to 20 of 29
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 12 3 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Donkey_Fizzle is offline

    Using Donkey Guard to Sniffz Your Feetz

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    between the moutains and some sagebrush
    Posts
    1,697

    Posted On:
    7/18/2007 6:00pm


     Style: Kick Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Eyes and ears open... mouth shut.

    If your instructor is worth his salt he'll pick up on your experience real quick. No need to fall into the "well when I trained in so-n-so" routine.
    Amateur MMA record: 8-3-1
    Pro MMA record: 3-1
    Status: Semi retarded... I mean retired
  2. Judobum is offline
    Judobum's Avatar

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    374

    Posted On:
    7/18/2007 6:01pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Zapruder
    I busted up laughin when i read this, as it was my first thought when i read the post, but if you are holding of brownbelts then I think you do more than stall in turtle or kesa/kizuri
    I turtle in judo ne-waza randori but that's more habit than anything else. My default start position with someone less skilled or smaller than me (or after I tap them) is the turtle. It's pretty standard in judo because it's a common position to end up in after a failed throw. It's an important strategic position to get good at in judo competitions because you're there a lot and you need to know how to hold someone off for a matte.

    We had an interesting discussion over beers after class on Monday, talking about the differences between BJJ and judo ne-waza. I mentioned that it's taken me the last few years of not actively competing to work on my game from the bottom because of the training I've done. Now that I'm not preparing for competitions I "play" more in ne-waza. For a judo competitor trying to do a sweep from the bottom is a bad idea since if you get it you're not guaranteed anything (guy can probably catch a leg to hold off a pin or hold out the five seconds you get to work a sub) and if you miss you're being held down. I generally tell competitors in class not to try sweeps or any move from the bottom where you're letting the guy out of your legs (which stops them from scoring a pin). Not good ne-waza but smart for the judo rule set.

    One of the interesting things from this method of training is my guard pretty much sucks. Against judo only players I'm fine and can do sweeps and armlocks but against BJJ guys I can't do much, especially if they're bigger than me. I find I actually prefer to give up my back, roll so my back is facing the mat and try to work out to half-guard and go from there rather than fighting from my guard. I'll let you know how that goes over tomorrow, LOL.
  3. Cassius is online now
    Cassius's Avatar

    Moderator

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    6,980

    Posted On:
    7/18/2007 6:11pm

    supporting memberforum leader
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Judobum
    Yeah, I'm going to have to rein in the ego a bit I think. I want to kind of get a better feel for BJJ and be a bit less intense than my usual. Unfortunately I'm pretty hyper-competitive on the mats so that's going to be tricky.
    This will likely be your biggest issue. Do NOT be that guy. If you find yourself thinking "I'M NOT LETTING THIS JOKER TAP ME!" or "I WILL WIN DAMMIT!" at any point during your first night, you are in the complete wrong frame of mind.

    This depends on how much mat space the school has: If you find yourself in someone's guard, or in any other position really, do not disengage, stand up, and back off, expecting your opponent to stand up. If you stand up, please be the guy that goes for a guard pass standing, and not the one that stands up out of mount "just to prove he could." If the club wants to do takedowns, then ignore this bit of advice, obviously.

    Don't let yourself get caught up in "Well you might do it like this in Judo, but here's how we do it in BJJ," conversations, or vice versa. Do not be that guy that STARTS those conversations, either. If someone tries to play this game with you, deftly sidestep the whole conversation by scratching the back of your head, shrugging your shoulders humbly, and saying something to the effect of "Well, this is just my first lesson of BJJ. I'm here to learn."

    Overall, just try to keep a low profile. Unless someone brings up your judo experience, don't mention in. If you're training BJJ long term, they'll find out soon enough.
    Last edited by Cassius; 7/18/2007 6:13pm at .
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  4. Judobum is offline
    Judobum's Avatar

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    374

    Posted On:
    7/18/2007 6:30pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cassius
    This will likely be your biggest issue. Do NOT be that guy. If you find yourself thinking "I'M NOT LETTING THIS JOKER TAP ME!" or "I WILL WIN DAMMIT!" at any point during your first night, you are in the complete wrong frame of mind.

    This depends on how much mat space the school has: If you find yourself in someone's guard, or in any other position really, do not disengage, stand up, and back off, expecting your opponent to stand up. If you stand up, please be the guy that goes for a guard pass standing, and not the one that stands up out of mount "just to prove he could." If the club wants to do takedowns, then ignore this bit of advice, obviously.

    Don't let yourself get caught up in "Well you might do it like this in Judo, but here's how we do it in BJJ," conversations, or vice versa. Do not be that guy that STARTS those conversations, either. If someone tries to play this game with you, deftly sidestep the whole conversation by scratching the back of your head, shrugging your shoulders humbly, and saying something to the effect of "Well, this is just my first lesson of BJJ. I'm here to learn."

    Overall, just try to keep a low profile. Unless someone brings up your judo experience, don't mention in. If you're training BJJ long term, they'll find out soon enough.
    I really do plan to avoid any of those conversations that you mention above. The low profile thing might be a problem since I'll likely be identified as "the guy who walked in and threw everybody around at judo on Monday" by those who I worked with at the judo class. I'm totally looking to learn and completely willing to tap when appropriate so we'll see how it goes.
  5. Ryno is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Seattle (Ballard), WA
    Posts
    1,776

    Posted On:
    7/18/2007 6:44pm


     Style: FMA, Jujutsu/Judo/SAMBO

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Judobum
    One of the interesting things from this method of training is my guard pretty much sucks. Against judo only players I'm fine and can do sweeps and armlocks but against BJJ guys I can't do much, especially if they're bigger than me. I find I actually prefer to give up my back, roll so my back is facing the mat and try to work out to half-guard and go from there rather than fighting from my guard. I'll let you know how that goes over tomorrow, LOL.
    We just had a visiting Judoka who I noticed this about. Since we're a very heavy newaza club I was really struck by this anomoly. I was playing with the guy doing takedowns, and real easy randori and this guy seemed very solid on his feet. Then we did newaza, and he catches me in his guard, where I passed it in maybe two seconds. I was wondering if I just caught him snoozing or something. But then after we go another round, I try a different pass, and get by his guard in a few seconds again.

    This might be an excellent opportunity for you to work on your guard game. BJJ is very strong at this position obviously, and I'm sure you'll pick up a lot from working with them. Their groundwork is much more patient, and methodically technical. I'm sure it'll be a very good experience.
  6. OldDog53 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    San Carlos
    Posts
    253

    Posted On:
    7/19/2007 11:52am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You should probably be GIVING advice and not asking for it, with 20 years of experience in Judo. But since you are the kind of guy who asks, you will be the kind of guy who won't have problems. Character, more than any "gameplan," is destiny in this setting.

    BTW, do they have "belt whippings" or running the gauntlet in Judo like they do in BJJ? Someone explain this brutish custom to him. Some schools do it on birthdays too, so don't EVER go to class on your birthday.
  7. JohnnyFive is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    657

    Posted On:
    7/19/2007 1:32pm


     Style: Judo/BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ... belt whippings? I've seen birthday throws (everybody throws the birthday boy) done... but /whippings/?
  8. Judobum is offline
    Judobum's Avatar

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    374

    Posted On:
    7/19/2007 5:02pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Typical judo tradition is all the black belts throwing the birthday person. That's the current tradition. In the good old days we used to give you a good old fashioned pink belly on your birthday or when you got promoted. Regardless of how big you were you got taken down and belly slapped for about fifteen minutes or so. Hurt like hell.... ahhh memories.
  9. Yrkoon9 is offline
    Yrkoon9's Avatar

    Brock Sampson

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Land of the Living
    Posts
    4,590

    Posted On:
    7/19/2007 7:07pm

    supporting member
     Style: 5.56

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Don't stall in pinning positions. I know Osaekomi is great in Judo, but try to stay active and moving to more dominant positions while doing BJJ and always look for the finish. Other than that - have some fun!
  10. Judobum is offline
    Judobum's Avatar

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    374

    Posted On:
    7/19/2007 9:49pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Just came back from class and I had a blast! It turned out to be no-gi but luckily the guy running it remembered he forgot to tell me that on Monday and brought me a t-shirt. No-gi is such a completely different animal then gi ne-waza. I figured it would be but the degree of difference kind of threw me.

    I think I overheard someone describing me as rolling like a "wild boar". That pretty much sums up how I felt. I'm pretty strong and explosive and that really doesn't work very well when I don't have anything to grab. I never realized how much I'm used to using the gi for control until tonight. Rolling with the one girl in the class was pretty funny, went something like this:

    Start on knees, I reach around her back
    Her- Don't grab my rash guard please
    Me - Sorry
    She ends up in guard and I go to pass
    Her- Don't grab the pants
    Me - Sorry
    Her in half-guard and me passing pushing her legs off my leg
    Her- You're grabbing the pants again
    Me - Sorry (outside voice) Fuuuckk (inside voice)

    The other thing I found is that judo instincts really, really mess you up in BJJ. Whenever I get pushed onto my back and I don't have a leg (and sometimes even if I do) I automatically spin to my stomach to avoid being pinned. I realized tonight that that is about the worst possible thing to do in no-gi. Luckily I'm extremely good at defending RNCs though. Rolling with the instructer he tapped me in a RNC once and commented on how hard good my defense was for a judo guy. The other instructer tapped me with a triangle when we rolled and I didn't really endanger either of them at any point in our sessions.

    The more beginner guys I could catch with superior positioning. I have pretty freakish balance which I used pretty well to float pass guards and once I had half-guard I could use kimuras and arm triangles to finish. I also caught one guy with an Ezekiel choke (the one Yoshida uses) which was pretty cool since I wasn't sure if it would work no-gi (apparently it does). My defense felt good but my offense sucks balls. My guard especially sucks balls. Without gi sleeves and collars to grab I was pretty much clueless as to what to do from there. Definately something to work on.

    All in all it was a great experience and something I'm definately going to try to pursue. It was really disorienting for me. The best comparision I have is when I tried snow boarding. I'm a good skier and it seemed like it should be pretty easy to switch over. Definately not the case with boarding and no-gi was much harder than I thought it would be.
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 12 3 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.