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  1. Meex is offline
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    Loving Father

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    Posted On:
    7/30/2007 3:42am

    supporting member
     Style: Tao Ga

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Istislah
    I'm really trying to, but I don't get this example at all.

    I agree with the 100% comment and see how if you were locked into a 50/50 mindset you might be tempted to move in a "lumbering" fashion as you tried to shift your weight around from foot to foot rather than just moving through your balance. I'm just having probems understanding the demonstration offered.

    Are you suggesting that a rapid shift in which foot is forward- essentially "hopping" to switch your rear leg forward and your front leg back should be an effective means of power generation for a forward strike?

    I'm thinking I'm missing something there.
    Sorry. . .I didn't want too much detail in the 'how' of it,
    just intending that the doing of it specifically from that
    'horse stance' would allow the brain to move forward.

    By your comments in the first part of your post, I am
    sure that you understood what I was getting at in the
    previous posts. So, this example wasn't made for you.

    However, I am not suggesting 'hopping.' To remain at
    100% from the original horse throughout the transition
    to moving forward would in essence take far more than
    a 'hop.' It involves control of the legs through the entire
    motion - which is more than just an exchange of the foot
    positions, but a pull forward from the front foot moving
    rearward, and the properly occurring 'heel-toe' step from
    the rear leg coming forward so that each leg has equally
    contributed to the forward motion.

    This also assures that at any point in between you are
    able to attack with power, and also change directions if
    the need arises, just by changing your 'stance.'

    In addition, you are able to kick, and sweep from the
    low position if you want, or raise it higher and still be
    able to use all of your weapons as you move, because
    you retain control throughout the movement.

    With a hop, you abandon your stance for a perceived
    gain in quickness, yet sacrifice everything else for it.

    `~/


    .
  2. Istislah is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/30/2007 6:26am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Mantis Kung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Meex
    <snip> a pull forward from the front foot moving
    rearward, and the properly occurring 'heel-toe' step from
    the rear leg coming forward so that each leg has equally
    contributed to the forward motion.
    That's what I was missing, now I know what you were trying to describe. Thanks for the clairification.

    Quote Originally Posted by Meex
    With a hop, you abandon your stance for a perceived
    gain in quickness, yet sacrifice everything else for it.
    Poetically stated, but essentially what I was concerned about. I thought perhaps you were trying to point out the utility of rotation of the hips as a source of power by isolating it from the planted stance with a "hopping" motion; you can imagine how I was hurting my brain trying to figure out how the mechanics of that could seem like a good idea.
  3. Locu5 is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/30/2007 6:45am

    supporting member
     Style: Alliance BJJ (Blue)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I reject your notions of stances, as needlessly timist.
  4. Meex is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/30/2007 9:56am

    supporting member
     Style: Tao Ga

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Istislah
    That's what I was missing, now I know what you were trying to describe. Thanks for the clairification.
    Glad that helped.
    Quote Originally Posted by Istislah
    I thought perhaps you were trying to point out the utility of rotation of the hips as a source of power by isolating it from the planted stance with a "hopping" motion;
    To use a 'hop' in generating power, you would probably want
    the forward strike at a slight downward angle, and have your
    body drop vertically at least a foot during the strike (down to
    one knee?). This would allow your force/strike to contact in
    two directions (forward and downward) using your mass as
    the source of power.

    `~/

    Quote Originally Posted by Locu5
    I reject your notions of stances, as needlessly timist.
    Your rejection is noted. However. . .what be "timist?"

    `~/

    .
  5. Istislah is offline

    Featherweight

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    Posted On:
    7/30/2007 10:18am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Mantis Kung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Meex

    Your rejection is noted. However. . .what be "timist?"
    Of or pertaining to the teachings of some guy named Tim?

    :tongue5:
  6. Meex is offline
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    Loving Father

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    Posted On:
    7/30/2007 10:32am

    supporting member
     Style: Tao Ga

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Istislah
    Of or pertaining to the teachings of some guy named Tim?

    :tongue5:
    By that definition it is definitely 'Timist'
    . . .one of my sihings is a 'Tim'. . .
    and, that would make it needfully Timist!

    `~/

    '
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