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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    78
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by SwitchBox
    **** you, I'll undo my 13 buttons and slap you in the face with my cock.


    But, actually, any NROTC is a great program, uniforms are awesome once they get the right fit, and everyone there is pretty friendly.
    And you get this awesome great paying job right out of college, and it gets paid for, what's the down side?
    Getting shipped to Iraq might be considered a down side... Provided we're still not out of there in 2-4 years.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Logan Utah
    Posts
    59
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If you're thinking getting shipped to a combat zone is a downside, the military probably isn't the best choice for a person.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    78
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Packinghouse Du
    If you're thinking getting shipped to a combat zone is a downside, the military probably isn't the best choice for a person.
    What sane person is going to label it as an upside?

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    860
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I was in AFROTC. As I understand it now, you recieve a stipend of $500 a month, books are reimbursed. AFROTC had two types of scholarships, type 1 which was a full ride, and type 2 which was about 8k (this was 11 years ago), and may be more now. Some type 2 scholarships were 3 years and you had to foot the cost your first year yourself. Some schools will provide you free room and board.

    It is not very much like a service academy. You wear your uniform once a week (plus for your academic ROTC class which sometimes may occur on a different day. There is also a leadership lab, which depending upon which service you are afflilated with will have different activities. For example the Navy guys got to learn how to do small boat sailing, in AFROTC it was usually some form of PT, lectures, drill or AFROTC style volleyball.

    Service commitment varies by the needs of the service and/or your job or additional education you take (more years if you go to grad school on the military's dime, more years if you are a pilot/nav, the years in flight school etc don't count). When I started AFROTC, there was an overproduction of officers and the seniors were given the option of 6 months active duty then 5 years reserves, while my classmates incurred a 5 year active duty commitment.

    Retention requirements were a 2.5 gpa and I believe a B or higher in your ROTC academic class.

    in AFROTC, morning PT was optional if you scored high enough on your PT test, I don't believe it was optional for the other ROTC classes.

    Scholarships for all three services are typically in engineering (particuraly EE for AFROTC and nuclear for NROTC), comp sci and meteorology. Scholarships apparently exist for the humanities, but they are exteremly few in number.

    At least for AFROTC, the last two years, even if you don't have a scholarship, you get a stipend.

    There are ROTC clubs, army and airforce cadets can participate in Ranger club (learn small unit manuevers, repelling etc), there is drill team, service societes etc.

    You also can fly space available travel on military aircraft if you are super cheap and have a lot of free time, however unless things have changed, there no access to the base exchange for cheap liquor etc.

    NROTC seems to have midshipmen do cruises each summer, while AFROTC has a 3 week summer training. Both army and air force cadets can compete for jump school slots (i believe air force cadets do it at the AF academy), and there is a glider school program as well.

    It is a relatively easy way to pay for college assuming you have an interst in one of the above majors, have enough spending money for a decent car payment and gas for about 4-8 hours a week of your time. The only downside is that you probably wont be staying up late at night like most of your friends, and that you have to report any speeding tickets your might get. Likewise, if you recieve a scholarship, you are enlisted in the reserves (but not subjected to the UMJ nor do you have to go to boot camp/1 weekend a month 2 weeks a year etc), so if you are dropped or quit the program, you may be forced to join the miliatary full time as an enlisted member, or you will just have to pay your scholarship money back. You can however drop out any time during the first year and incur no obligation at all.

  5. #15
    SFGOON's Avatar
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    Nov 2005
    Location
    Seattle, WA
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    2,208
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ^ = true

    me = drunk

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    96
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by teddy_bear
    What sane person is going to label it as an upside?

    some one who take the Marine Option for NROTC.......................oh wait, Marines aren't supposed to be sane........

  7. #17
    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten. supporting member
    Devil's Avatar
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    Mar 2006
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    7,435
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Any involvement with the Navy is a downside.

  8. #18
    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten. supporting member
    Devil's Avatar
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    Mar 2006
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    7,435
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Also, if getting laid is your goal, you'll be better off becoming a frat boy. Then, start a real career when you get out of school. Chicks dig money, and servicemen don't have much - not even officers, when compared to what you can make with a white collar career in the civilian world.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    860
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by devil
    Also, if getting laid is your goal, you'll be better off becoming a frat boy. Then, start a real career when you get out of school. Chicks dig money, and servicemen don't have much - not even officers, when compared to what you can make with a white collar career in the civilian world.
    Depends on what you do, the retention bonuses for some career paths (such as nuclear where they can't keep people in the field, or for pilots) in conjunction with flight/sea pay isn't too bad. Plus if you are in the navy and out at sea, you won't be spending much money while on ship (though you will probably curse any car payments/rent payments you have as all of my navy friends did while they were at sea).

  10. #20
    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten. supporting member
    Devil's Avatar
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    Mar 2006
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    7,435
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by hl1978
    Depends on what you do, the retention bonuses for some career paths (such as nuclear where they can't keep people in the field, or for pilots) in conjunction with flight/sea pay isn't too bad. Plus if you are in the navy and out at sea, you won't be spending much money while on ship (though you will probably curse any car payments/rent payments you have as all of my navy friends did while they were at sea).

    Okay, but most officers aren't nuclear specialists or pilots. I would say that type of field is at the top of the food chain in the military. And if you're going to compare those jobs to the civilian world, you have to compare them to civilian occupations at the top of the food chain. If you do that, there's really no comparison.
    Last edited by Devil; 7/17/2007 10:47am at .

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