1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    What's with the lurker hating?

    Hey peeps.

    Getting annoyed by the constant nag-messages saying I wasn't registered and the 'maybe you should register'-messages, I made an account.

    Then I got harrassed by an even larger, more in your face, "OH MY FRIKKIN GOD, YOU SHOULD MAKE A POST"-message atop every thread I try to read.

    Which basically lead me to abandon forum the first time around.

    Finally I got back here, because you guys do actually have some interested stuff in here, but I feel like I'm forced to make a spammy thread in some forum I really don't feel like posting in. That can't be right, can it?

    (PS: yes, 'forced' is the wrong word, but you know what I mean..I hope)

  2. #2
    TKDBot
    Guest
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Welcome to the Bullshido Forums Egregius... Make sure you review your dojo and add it to your user control panel so you can get the icon in your user info bar in your posts.

  3. #3
    Sevengraff's Avatar
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    Apr 2007
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Just find a laid-back thread and post your thoughts there. It'll keep the BIG TEXT away.

    Also tell me about your Tai Chi. My Aikido instructor also teachers Tai Chi and one my friends mentioned being interested in taking it so maybe I can get into it with him some time.

  4. #4
    slideyfoot's Avatar
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    Artemis BJJ | Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in Bristol
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Welcome to Bullshido...again!

    Quote Originally Posted by Egregius
    Finally I got back here, because you guys do actually have some interested stuff in here, but I feel like I'm forced to make a spammy thread in some forum I really don't feel like posting in. That can't be right, can it?
    Easiest way to start is post about your MA experience here in newbietown. Then possibly a few welcome posts in other newbie threads. Follow that by going to the throwdown section and find a thread for your area (or perhaps start one yourself). Simplest route of all is to buy yourself a supporting membership :20bux:, then start a training log.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sorry for the negativity, just needed to get that out of my system. But I do think it's a bit counter-productive. Anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sevengraff
    Also tell me about your Tai Chi. My Aikido instructor also teachers Tai Chi and one my friends mentioned being interested in taking it so maybe I can get into it with him some time.
    I'd be happy to. I came across tai chi when I was in my 'spiritual phase' at the end of puberty, reading up on 'energy' and Chinese philosophy. What peaked my interest the most was a short demonstration video where I saw a really old guy practically launch a student a meter backwards half into the air with what seemed to be a few subtle moves. I wanted to be able to do that, and be fit and spy at age 80. :)

    When you learn tai chi you basically learn the form, which is comparable to kata, but actually is a pre-determined series of exercises. Eg 'bring arm up in block' followed by 'grab arm and pull to your side' followed by 'push opponent across his unstable line'. But usually they don't tell you what the exercises mean untill you've advanced a lot.

    Eventually found a place where they taught the yang-form (lineage from Cheng Man Ching) by slowly going through every move in the form stressing where you put your weight, a straight back, moving from your dantien and 'sinking'. Eventually quit because of the long commute.

    Much later restarted because I missed TCC, found a place a slightly shorter commute away, and because of a special offer, took advantage of the 'free second class the first month' and took classes in two different forms: Wu-style and Chen-style. I liked Wu-style a lot (it's a more compact form, originally taught to the Chinese imperial guard apparently, who wore relatively heavy armor), but I had heavy doubt about the teacher: he seemed overworked with the many classes and martial art forms he taught, he didn't explain basic principles like keeping a straight back and keeping your knees pointed in the same direction as your knees all the time (I wasn't the only one who got painful knees), he rushed through warming up, and his footwork was very sloppy when compared to his best student imho. Also he rushed through the form (we did the first 5 stances in the first class, normally you might get to the fifth stance in class 5 or 6), and had weird 'spiritual' exercises to 'awaken' our 'energy-motor'. I'm a bit too much of a skeptic for that.

    After that first month I moved and immediatly found another (imho much better) teacher closer by. Still training there and liking it a lot. He explains the principles behind the form a lot, and before we started learning the form, he first made us do exercises meant to become familiar with the way of moving and principles behind it before we even did the first stance. And in contrast with the other teachers (and his own teachers in China), he explains the martial application of each move. It's much easier to understand what the hell you're supposed to do if you know you're supposed to pull someone in a certain direction by using your weight for example. And because he's a skeptic dutch guy who studied cognitive ergonomy he tries to find the body-mechanics and physics behind moving a certain way instead of saying it's because of energy-flow. Me like.
    Of course he isn't sure he's got explosive power(fa-jin) figured out yet. ;)

    Someone once said martial arts have five focuses. Tai chi seems to fall firmly under only 2 and 3, aka 'tradition/physical artform/self-discipline' and 'spiritual/health' (stay away from tai chi schools that enter competitions!), as my teacher also said that if you want to learn tai chi in a martial way, you should learn it differently from how he's teaching it (or rather: different from how anyone in Holland is teaching it).

    Tai chi is in ways comparable to aikido (and according to some one of the major influences of aikido) in that there's a big spiritual component (since it's basically a martial application of yin and yang) and the principles behind the moves/pushes/pulls/throws are similar. But with tai chi there's perhaps more focus on the meditative side in moving very deliberately, if I compare with a friend's aikido experience. And as my teacher said: in tai chi you don't learn techniques, you learn principles of movement.

    When learning tai chi, you almost always learn the entire form extensively before you move on to the really fun stuff, like push-hands, two-person form, weapon-forms and 'moving your chi' (in whatever way you want to explain the latter).

    And it is just me, or do I like to type too much?
    Last edited by Egregius; 7/17/2007 7:15am at . Reason: want to add a thought

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