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  1. #21
    kwoww's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I don't know if anyone said this yet (I haven't read the replies yet, I'm sorry), but you're hitting on a bit of an angle. Note how the holder's arm is forced up. You should probably use a bag for training kicks like this, because they force you out of this habit. The solution is to turn your hip over more, which requires some or all of the following: more torque, pivoting the supporting foot more, or stepping further off to the side before kicking.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Hawaii
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    158
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for the replies everyone. I've been really sick in the past few days. I'll keep this in mind this next time I train. :)

  3. #23
    bobyclumsyninja's Avatar
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    May 2007
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    7,058
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    heavy bag is better, better yet...a tough sparring partner who'll shin check them or block and circle round, counterstriking.... and let you get the range of their counter punches...then you'll keep your arms up.

  4. #24
    patfromlogan's Avatar
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    Sep 2002
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    8,885
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Zyph
    Relax, take a deep breath and relax your body. They way you are kicking is forcing your body to work against its self. I did this for years, eventually I relaxed and the kicks became harder on their own.

    Also looked like you had a single Thai pad. I am not sure why those damn things are even sold alone. Get another one and look in a book or two at ways to hold them properly.
    I promise more when I am more awake J
    Later,
    Zyph



    well this pissed me off when I read it but he has a point in this and the next about going thru not to the target. I'd just hit the heavy bag a lot and think about the MT hip turn into the target, downward landing the kick with a thud, hitting with your shin.

    I did lots of heavy bag for years and eventually got ok at it. Then one day Shihan said that my kata sucked. Why not do it like I was delivering hard to the big bag? So I changed my kata to make it look like my bag work and got about 100 times better in five minutes.
    "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    1,083
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here's my comments.

    - You're not pivoting enough. Try this. Do your kick slow motion, when your shins contact the pads, you should have enough bend in your knees (you'll only get this by pivoting enough) to push yourself back to fighting stance. If you do not have enough bend in your knees to push yourself back to fighting stance, you're not pivoting enough. When your kick is connecting, your body should be facing the left (for right kick) and your right shoulder should be uppermost.

    - Straighten your supporting leg, you're kicking with a bent leg. You only kick with a bent supporting leg when you're doing a low kick, for mid and high kicks, straighten your supporting leg and try to tiptoe if possible, it'll allow you the smallest contact area on the floor, which will give you maximum momentum with the kick.

    - Swing your right arm down for power and balance, but don't swing your left arm down, put it palm facing outwards on your opposite (right) cheek to catch punches. When you get more advanced, some people like to swing the right arm down, but not completely, and then stick it straight out to prevent getting countered with punches while kicking. It's a choice thing.

    - You're snapping your kicking leg at the knee, if you're attempting to do a muay thai kick, don't do that. The power comes mostly from your pushing off the ground with your kicking leg, and your pivoting. Imagine your right arm pulling a rope, pull it down and use the counterforce to spin your body to power the kick. To practice, try it without kicking first, just do the arm motion and pivot your body. Your supporting foot should at minimum be pointing to the left, better if it can point towards the rear a little.

    - you're kicking at an upward 45 degree angle. It's ok and is a legit technique, but I prefer to cut in horizontally. When you fight an opponent with a tight guard and you kick 45 degrees, you may kick his elbow, which is very damaging to you.

    - for the left kick, you can do what you're doing, but it's better to practice taking a step forward with your right foot first (45 degree to your right) and kicking. This is how you're going to do it in a fight. When you get better, you can add in the switch.

    *Pivoting your supporting leg and turning the body to face the opposite direction is critical to getting power in your left kick.

    - Your pad holder is holding the pads wrong. I can't really see clearly, but you're supposed to hold it so that your palm is facing the striking limb, whether it be kick or punch.

    - Ask your padholder to stand upright, in fighting stance, and keep his rear foot on the ball of his foot, this will allow him to brace for impact. Also, ask him to slam the pads into your shin at the instant of impact.

  6. #26

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    Mar 2007
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    75
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Lemme see how your feet look on these. it is an important factor.

  7. #27

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    Jul 2007
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Don't load up the hip before you fire the roundhouse, lauch straight from your stance. When rotating the hip, save the rotation for the last few inchs of the kick as you hone in on the target. As you strike the target drop your dead weight and put point of impact into the kick. This will create a larger transference of energy into the target and do more harm than a kick through.

    As for the hand, use it to guard, it doesn't add power, it only weighs a few kilos, your deadweight will generate and point of impact will generate all the power you require out of the kick.

    That really should be all you need.

  8. #28

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    Jun 2007
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    Finland
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Dropping your kick-side hand doesn't add power, because it only weighs a few kilos???

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Compared to the dead weight of your entire body, that is right.

  10. #30

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    Apr 2007
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    Cork, Ireland
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    31
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i may be wrong but you don't seem to have any control over your kick and are just going for sheer power. From looking at that it looks as though you would flying of in a big twirl if the bag were moved. Apply this to a kicking a person, if they just step out of the way you're going to keep going and end up with your back facing them.

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