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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    How do I do that (Mongolian wrestling)?

    I know this vid has been posted like a long time ago its still interesting though. Its kinda neat that they just where sleeves not a whole shirt or pants and work from those grips.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wB6WISba5M

    But I am curious as to what is happening at 2:00 of the vid? I cannot find a judo equivalnet of that move. It looked really cool and it looked like they were using sleeve grips. I have been stuck in similar clinches and it would be cool to pull something off like that. The guy is somehow spinning and ducking under but landing on top.

    Does someone have a tutorial or at least some idea of what is happening there? I can't quite figure it out.
    Last edited by rsobrien; 6/30/2007 1:00pm at .

  2. #2

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It's not the same exact thing, but it's similar enough.
    The flying mare:
    http://www.bullshido.net/forums/show...ht=flying+mare

    Still looking for vids

  3. #3

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    duck under and then a massive sitout. i've seen some stuff like this in real wrestling, but it hasta be much easier with those sleeves.

  4. #4

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh...now I understand what you mean. That's called a sit through. I have that in my SAMBO highlight reel if you want to take a look at it. You over grip the arm, then duck your head under keeping tight to the body and sit through. YOu have to make sure they're giving you their base when you do this though.

  5. #5

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think the judo name is ude gaeshi.

  6. #6

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Was I even close?

  7. #7

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A bit....cross checking now.

  8. #8

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yes and no, the Judo technique is really similiar, the flying mare that was referenced before is close to ude gaeshi. That Mongolian technique uses more head leverage as I was referring to.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Minnesota
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Omega the Merciless
    You have to make sure they're giving you their base when you do this though.
    I haven't seen the specific technique but I've seen throws on a similar principle. I think its necessary for them to be leaning forward before you execute that throw like Omega says. Either they are already leaning forward too much or you can force that condition.

    I'll have to ask my teacher about the details on that technique. I see a difference in how the mongolian throw ends when compared to the flying mare. Mongolian throws are intended to put the person very close to you. You want to be close to them when they fall. It looks like the flying mare relys on the arm bar and finishes at a greater distance.

  10. #10
    Still digging on James Brown

    Join Date
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    1,333
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Similar technique can be used from under the sprawl when the opponent has an underhook. From there I find it effective to first push up a little, making the opponent press down and then hit it. The base switching you can drill with the corner drill to find the balance points.

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