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  1. SoulAssasin is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/03/2007 4:46pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: kung fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Angry Monkey Kung Fu : Is this bullshido?

    Hi Guys,
    This is a school in Cleveland. I took a couple of introductory classes of this angry monkey kung fu. It seem authentic, something rub me the wrong way. There was alot of stretching , which seems like it would go along with any monkey kung fu. The instructor taught a kids class before the monkey kung fu, would sell the kids candy ahd soda after class( I guess its beat crack cocaine). One of the thing he mention about this angry monkey kung fu, that there was no weapons in the system. I have never heard of a kung fu system without weapon sets or training. Also the lineage seem weird, to have a short list lineage with untraceable chinese names, some abbreviated, and throw a leroy johnson in the midst. Here the website , let me know what you think
    http://www.shaolininstitute.com/Angr...%20History.htm
  2. kwoww is offline
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    poser

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    Posted On:
    6/03/2007 5:01pm


     Style: punching bag / crew jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    At first blush, it looks like Grade A bullshit to me.
    The third flavor is that of the pure monkey fighting style. This type of monkey has no back flips or cartwheels, but uses monkey tactics and relates them to human fighting situations. There are very few pure monkey fighting styles left because it is so savage and our societies tend to lean away from violence.
    This, combined with the entirely unconfirmable lineage and the CANDY AFTER THE KIDS CLASSES (wtf?!), definitely are typical signs of BS.

    What kinds of claims is the school making, and how do you think it lives up to them?
  3. ty5 is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/03/2007 5:24pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A quick google threw this up:
    http://forum.kungfumagazine.com/foru...t=43996&page=2
    where he learnt Angry Monkey seems to be a sensitive issue.

    So what are the classes like SoulAssasin? what does this style actually look like whent they practise it? any cheeky moneky fondles the peach moves?
  4. SoulAssasin is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/03/2007 5:43pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: kung fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Angry Monkey kf

    The only claim the teacher ( Sifu Gino) made, was it was a authentic kung fu system. I was there for two introductory classes. Supposely , Sifu was selective of students admit to the angry monkey class, due to the rigorous stretching and workouts ( Personally, Kyokushin was more rigorous). I was offered admittance, saw the students doing unrealistic defense moves( too much of acrobatic flair) and the cloud of bs, I declined. Thanks for the link. It confirms the angry monkey is damn elusive to a basic question of lineage and is bs
    Last edited by SoulAssasin; 6/03/2007 10:07pm at .
  5. Omega Supreme is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/03/2007 6:10pm

    staff
     Style: Chinese Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There are 9 systems of Monkey that I've heard of....

    How many do I actually remember?

    Drunken Monkey
    Stone Monkey (not to be confused with Stoned monkey which is a version of Drunken Monkey...lol....what do you mean it's not funny?)


    That's about all I can remember (brain damage sucks), but I don't remember any angry monkey.
  6. Nickeroon1987 is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/03/2007 10:10pm


     Style: Goju-Ryu, BJJ, MT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monkey_kung_fu

    There are six variations of monkey kung fu developed as part of the Tai Sheng Men system, and still utilized in the later Tai Sheng Pek Kwar system (although the Crafty monkey variation described below has been absorbed into the Lost monkey curriculum in Tai Shing Pek Kwar and Bak Si Lum among others, hence there are only five variations listed, in these systems):
    1. Drunken Monkey uses a lot of throat, eye and groin strikes as well as tumbling and falling techniques. It incorporates a lot of false steps to give the appearance it is defenseless and uses a lot of off balance strikes. The practitioner waddles, takes very faltering steps and sometimes fall to the ground and lies prone while waiting the opponent to approach at which time a devastating attack is launched at the knees or groin areas of the opponent.In drunken monkey you use more internal energy than any other. It is one of the most difficult monkeys' to master and also the most powerful.
    2. Stone Monkey is a "physical" style. The practitioner trains up his body to exchange blows with the opponent - Stone Monkey uses the monkey's Iron body method. It will leave an area exposed on its body for an opponent to attack, so it can attack a more vital spot on the body.
    3. Lost Monkey feigns a lot. He gives the appearance of being lost and confused to deceive the opponent into underestimating his abilities, and he retaliates when least expected. The hands and footwork change and flow from each other at will. All monkeys are sociable animals and so they live in troops or family groups. They are also very territorial by nature and so when they wander into the territory of another troop there is normally a fight possibly resulting in death to the trespassers. This technique incorporates the fear, nervousness and mischief of a monkey who has wandered into a neighboring territory, in that it attempts to pick and eat as many fruits and insects as can be found in the new territory as is possible while nervously looking around before scurrying back to its own home range.
    4. Standing Monkey or Tall Monkey is a relatively conventional monkey that likes to keep an upright position and avoid tumbling around. This style is more suited for tall people. Tall monkey likes to climb body limbs to make attacks at pressure points. It is a long range style.
    5. Crafty monkey is very deceptive, it uses different faked emotions to lure opponents into attacking. By pretending to be scared for example it lulls the opponent into a false sense of security and waits for the opponents guard to be down, then suddenly attacks when not expected. This variation is not listed in the Tai Shing Pek Kwar system, instead it appears to have been absorbed into the Lost Monkey curriculum.
    6. Wooden Monkey mimics a serious, angry monkey that attacks and defends with ferocity. The attitude of this monkey is more serious, and its movements are noticeably less light than the other monkeys. Wood monkey likes to grapple and bring its opponent to the ground.
    It seems that "wooden" and "angry" monkey is one and the same. I've never known anything beyond monkey and "drunken" monkey styles. Are all these individual styles, or just a form or two?
  7. Omega Supreme is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/03/2007 10:15pm

    staff
     Style: Chinese Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Could've sword there were 9 but maybe I"m being dyslexic. From what I remember had everything to do with body types.
  8. FictionPimp is offline

    Sexiest Punching Bag Alive

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    Posted On:
    6/04/2007 2:10pm


     Style: BJJ/Judo/Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    They have a link to full contact kickboxing tournaments on their site. That has to count for something.
  9. Grashnak is offline
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    Old School DM

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    Posted On:
    6/04/2007 7:17pm

    supporting member
     Style: Nothing current

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well, I know nothing about Kung Fu, but here is the Grand Master's bio:

    GRAND MASTER KWONG WING LAM

    Sifu Kwong Wing Lam was born in Canton and began his training in Chinese martial arts in Hong Kong at age eight. He began his studies in Tai Chi. But because of its slow movements and focus on meditation rather than physical activity, Tai Chi was a poor choice for one of his age. After about six months he lost interest and quit. A year later he began studying Southern Hung Gar from Master Chiu Chao and his son, Master Chiu Wei. In this style Sifu Lam discovered the fun of practicing Kung Fu.

    Curious to know more about the arts, Sifu Lam also studied Northern Shaolin under Master Yen Shang Wo for six years. He spent his childhood mornings training with the Chiu's, and his evenings training with Yen Shang Wo. This training was conducted in the traditional manner: learning movements of a set step by step and refraining from learning new techniques until the old ones were mastered to perfection.

    Upon completing the Hung Gar and Shaolin systems, he spent another ten years learning other styles such as Five Animal Fist, Praying Mantis, Ha Say Fu Hung Gar, and Wing Tsun, with such notable masters as Leung Hua Chu and Lum Jow. In addition, Sifu Lam hit sand bags for Iron Palm training, and practiced Chi Kung (Iron Body) for strength. He also completed the Tai Chi system from Master Yen. Sifu Lam has been a major force in establishing the legitimacy of Kung Fu in this country. He emigrated to the United States in 1965, and opened his San Francisco School in 1967. He opened a second school in Sunnyvale six years later. Since then, he has been featured in numerous articles in martial arts magazines such as Inside Kung Fu and Black Belt. Sifu Lam has taught Kung Fu and Tai Chi at De Anza College in California, and led seminars across the country and in Europe. He also has made videotapes, and written books on Kung Fu.

    In the last 30 years, he has taught several thousand students and certified many new masters. Many of these masters now have their own schools. Sifu Lam and these instructors continue to help students achieve their goals and reach their fullest potential in the martial arts. Never satisfied with the poor quality of modern Chinese weapons, Sifu Lam has learned to forge and fit his own arms -- swords, knives, chain whips, and halberds. His specialty is the custom refitting of blades with heavy guards and handles, worthy of practice and combat. Some of Sifu Lam's pieces have commanded over a thousand dollars. Now Sifu Lam is proud to present his custom creations to the public.
    TMA fans can comment on this but a couple of things jump out at me:

    1) "Upon completing the Hung Gar and Shaolin systems" - he claims to have "completed" the Hung Gar and Shaolin systems in 6 years. Who claims to have "completed" any martial art?

    2) Dude claims to have studied/mastered Hung Gar, Shaolin, Five Animal Fist, Praying Mantis, Ha Say Fu Hung Gar, and Wing Tsun, Tai Chi, Iron Palm, Chi Kung, and blacksmithing of traditional weapons. Can any TMA practitioner confirm if this is a credible course of study? Who would do that?

    3) Can anyone confirm that he was a "major force in establishing the legitimacy of Kung Fu in this country"?
    Jesus loves you. I think you're an asshole.
  10. Abusivemelon is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/05/2007 8:37am


     Style: Lethargy

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Angry monkey Kung fu? Is something wrong....?
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