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  1. ggboxer is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/25/2007 1:32pm


     Style: undecided

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Defending the Horse Stance

    I've heard the Horse Stance get knocked a bit for being too immobile/impractical for realistic fight situations. Obviously it has its limitations, But it can provide great stability and is actually quite versatile during in-fighting situations. I realize its just not really incorporated into Boxing or Muay Thai footwork , but was wondering if anyone had any positive feedback about it. Non-traditional sports styles are welcome to comment.
  2. Ke?poFist is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/25/2007 1:34pm

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     Style: Kaju, BJJ, Judo, Kempo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Horse stance is good for keeping a base in grappling when postured outside the open guard. In stand-up striking terms it's useless.
    Knowing is not enough, you must apply...
    ...Willing is not enough you must do
    ~Bruce Lee

  3. Teh El Macho is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/25/2007 1:37pm

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     Style: creonte on hiatus

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ggboxer
    I've heard the Horse Stance get knocked a bit for being too immobile/impractical for realistic fight situations. Obviously it has its limitations, But it can provide great stability and is actually quite versatile during in-fighting situations. I realize its just not really incorporated into Boxing or Muay Thai footwork , but was wondering if anyone had any positive feedback about it. Non-traditional sports styles are welcome to comment.
    Explain.
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

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    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  4. ignatzami is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/25/2007 1:39pm


     Style: Judo, BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    GG, darling. The Horse stance is a training tool, not a combative stance. It may have uses in combat, but I'm sure you could find uses for anything in combat. But there are vastly better ways to go about it. Not to mention it is TERRIBLE for your hips and knees.

    As for in-fighting a low immobile stance is not where you want to be, a higher, athletic, mobile posture that allows you to quickly move and adapt is infinitely superior. This discussion can now be considered closed.

    Horse stance sucks.
  5. Ke?poFist is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/25/2007 1:52pm

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     Style: Kaju, BJJ, Judo, Kempo

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    Um....did you all miss my response? I understand GG is trolling for responses, and that he is referring to standup useages, but the stance itself does come in handy when trying to keep you posture in bull-fighting range.
    Knowing is not enough, you must apply...
    ...Willing is not enough you must do
    ~Bruce Lee

  6. From Bell2Bell is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/25/2007 1:54pm


     Style: The Sweet Science

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In the years I spent on kung fu no one ever suggested that it was a good idea to fight from horse stance. It's used for conditioning, and it's also used to illustrate (in an exagerated way) how to use your hips and legs to generate power, not as something to use in a fight.
  7. cyrijl is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/25/2007 1:55pm

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     Style: BJJ, MT, Yoga

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    don't feed the troll
  8. From Bell2Bell is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/25/2007 1:57pm


     Style: The Sweet Science

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    Quote Originally Posted by KempoFist
    Um....did you all miss my response? I understand GG is trolling for responses, and that he is referring to standup useages, but the stance itself does come in handy when trying to keep you posture in bull-fighting range.

    Honestly a good low horse stance would be very awkward to grapple from. I know a lot of styles have high comfortable horse stances but the style of kung fu I practiced put a lot of emphasis on traditional stances and my understanding is that it's supposed to be just about as low as you can make it.
  9. Ke?poFist is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/25/2007 2:06pm

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     Style: Kaju, BJJ, Judo, Kempo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by From Bell2Bell
    Honestly a good low horse stance would be very awkward to grapple from. I know a lot of styles have high comfortable horse stances but the style of kung fu I practiced put a lot of emphasis on traditional stances and my understanding is that it's supposed to be just about as low as you can make it.
    I use it all the time when outside the open guard. Posturing yourself angled off 45degrees or so to prevent them from scooping your ankles and reversing, allows you to work for a solid pass to side control. Also very useful for standing guard passes.






    Knowing is not enough, you must apply...
    ...Willing is not enough you must do
    ~Bruce Lee

  10. From Bell2Bell is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/25/2007 2:15pm


     Style: The Sweet Science

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    Quote Originally Posted by KempoFist
    I use it all the time when outside the open guard. Posturing yourself angled off 45degrees or so to prevent them from scooping your ankles and reversing, allows you to work for a solid pass to side control. Also very useful for standing guard passes.

    Your pictures just explained why we're disagreeing. What you're posting is a very high horse stance... sort of. My experience was with a school that was obsessed with low stances though, so that guy would have to bend his knees and sink much lower for it to be what we were doing. This is a nit-picky sort of complaint though; the only thing I ever use horse stance for now is as a warm up and I only do that when I get bored of the other excercises I use.
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