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  1. blue-dragon is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2003 5:30pm


     Style: Boxing and Moo Duk Kwan

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've heard the old Soviet strenth training is good. My cousin has recommened me to learn about this Pavel Tsatsouline and now I'm sold. Thanks!

    I've heard this before and would like an answer.

    Did the Soviet Special Forces do more power training as compared to U.S. Special Forces who train for endurance? Were the Soviets powerlifting while Americans were running obstacle courses.?
  2. Phrost is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/20/2003 6:20pm

    Business Class Supporting Memberstaff
     Guy Who Pays the Bills and Gets the Death Threats Style: MMA (Retired)

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I was training for U.S. Army Special Forces before I got derailed by meeting my ex wife. The assessment school is almost completely endurance, especially mental.

    Physical strength isn't as important as an individual's intestinal fortitude and heart, and ability to intigrate into a team.

    That said, a lot of the SF guys I knew did work out on their own time, but it wasn't anything command mandated.
  3. Dochter is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2003 6:59pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I only agree with some of the results. I wonder what the person's martial art background would be to help him come to this conclusion. I've consulted weight lifting coaches with PHD's on the subject and have had varying responses. Universally though high reps are good but you'd have to reduce the sets. You're not supposed to lift until fatigue for martial arts practice which is where I find the problem lies in the above scenerio.

    Official WTDude Badass Evil Genius
    omega, he actually mentions in this article (which is all I've read by him) that gains can be made and maintained without working to faliure. What his ma background is I don't know. Like I said I agree with some not all of what he said.

    I think a lot of it is also personal preference and goals.

    <img src=icon_smile_tongue.gif border=0 align=middle> I mainly liked it for the highlighted rips anyway.<img src=icon_smile_tongue.gif border=0 align=middle>

    .
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    My single chopstick is bad at serving soup, cutting steaks and basting roasts and chickens. Besides that it owns.
  4. WTDude is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2003 8:07pm


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Several years ago I lifted weights with a world-class competitive powerlifter for a couple of years. It was very rare for him to do more than 5 reps on any exercise (usually 3 reps on squats and bench press).
  5. blue-dragon is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2003 10:25pm


     Style: Boxing and Moo Duk Kwan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    " physical strength isn't as important as an individuals intestinal fortitude and heart, and ability to intigrate into a team "

    That quote sums up the core of U.S. military training.

    "Our strength is not in numbers or sheer force, but in the undominatable spirit within.
  6. Phrost is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/23/2003 10:54pm

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     Guy Who Pays the Bills and Gets the Death Threats Style: MMA (Retired)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Got the book today, 34 pages into it right now.

    So far the ideas seem sound, basing a lot of the concepts on how genuine powerlifters train vs. gym queens who gain loads of cosmetic, unnecessary muscle mass without proportionate strength.

    The secret to gaining drastic strength so far seems to be concentration and focus on the muscle contractions as you lift around 90% of your 1RM only a few times.

    I'm going to give this a shot. Although for vanity's sake I wouldn't mind having "big guns", I wouldn't want them at the expense of being able to throw hard punches.
  7. Fatality Dragon is offline

    Reading FD cause cancer

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    Posted On:
    8/24/2003 12:29am


     Style: Muay Thai and boxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    WTF!? I do 3 rep, 15 set each rep (45 time per work out), is that too much? What will happen if I continue to do this?
    My goal is to try go up to 4 rep of 15 set using a 50 lbs dumbbell for 5 different work out and 4 rep of 10 set using a 200 lbs bench press bar. Plus 50 of each 8 type of push up and 9 type of sit up.

    It is a rat eat rat world.

    "A magical place where I have a freakish large penis and I am also the king of the mushroom people." - by Omen Stone
    I would pick bag work over masturbating, fighting over sex, and KOing someone over having a orgasm!
  8. Phrost is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/24/2003 11:29am

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     Guy Who Pays the Bills and Gets the Death Threats Style: MMA (Retired)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    FD, I finished the book today. According to the book, you should be doing around 85% of your 1RM, so I'd imagine you'd have problems completing 15 sets.

    Another point he makes, is that you should keep the muscles tensed through the entire excercise, and not just the speific muscles needed for the exercise, but all of your structural muscles as well.

    I'm about to head to the gym now and give my first workout on this plan a shot. I'll keep you posted.
  9. WTDude is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/24/2003 1:23pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What is the rationale for keeping all of the muscles tensed? Is this supposed to strengthen the structural muscles or is it for some other reason?
  10. Phrost is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/24/2003 1:44pm

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     Guy Who Pays the Bills and Gets the Death Threats Style: MMA (Retired)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The idea behind keeping the muscles tensed is to counteract the neurological impulses that keep you from impaling yourself with a fork, for example, when you're eating with the utensil; your body's way of preventing you from using more of your muscles' potential so you don't injure yourself.

    By tensing all muscle groups around the body part being worked, and including the structural muscles and abs, you nullify this impulse by making your nervous system "more comfortable" with allowing you to lift more.

    To simplify this a bit, have you ever wondered why the insane, and the mentally disabled have HUGE ammounts of strength? It's not because they have any extra muscles generally, it's because their mind is damaged and they lack the impulses which limit your muscle exertion.

    It sounds strange, but it works. Try it for yourself.

    I just got back from the gym a few minutes ago, my first day of trying this type of training per the book.

    Here's how it went:

    "Press Day"

    Flat +1 bench (inclined one notch-need to work my upper pecs a bit more) w/dumbells (weight is per hand, duh):

    Set 1: 50 lbs x4, taking 3-5 seconds to fully extend, short rest at the lockout, and 3-5 seconds on the way down (Same for all sets)

    3 minute rest, stretching, shadowboxing to keep loose. (Same for all rests)

    Set 2: 50 lbs x4

    Rest

    Set 3: 45 lbs x4

    Rest

    Set 4: 45 lbs x4

    Rest

    Set 5: 40 lbs x4

    Rest

    Set 6: 45 lbs x4


    Side Presses (described in the book, sort of a one-handed military press done perpendicular to your frame): done light because I'm working on my form since I've never done these before:

    Set 1: 40 lbs x 4

    Set 2: 40 lbs x 4

    Farmer's walk (not in the book, for my own forearm development)

    50 lbs x 10 feet x 4 "laps"

    Lunges (for my shoots)

    50 lbs x 10 feet x 4 "laps"

    And hell, I feel like a million bucks. I'm not burned out or even sore in the least, like I usually get after a workout. In fact, I could probably have continued doing this for another hour.

    I'll be doing the "Pulling" part of my workout either tomorrow or tuesday, taking a day of rest, then repeating the cycle. After a week, I'll add 5 lbs to the weight, and repeat up until a 6 week period is complete. Then, as the book advises, I'll take a few steps back with my max weight in order to continue making gains.

    I'm going to give this a shot for a few months, or until I find a major flaw with it (or get injured). So far (after a whopping 2 hours on the program), I'm happy, so we'll see.
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