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  1. fox is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/21/2007 9:38pm


     Style: American Karate,TSD,KFSS

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quan-Fa.com
    There is a video but it is up to BoxingBear or Adam Hull to send it or post it on here.
  2. chalkieusa is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/21/2007 9:54pm


     Style: Kenpo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Jesus, fellas, this guy is spreading his bullshit now on facebook.

    Will it never stop?

    Drop on over to facebook and have a gander for yourselves!
  3. fox is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/21/2007 9:57pm


     Style: American Karate,TSD,KFSS

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    link plz?
  4. fox is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/21/2007 10:19pm


     Style: American Karate,TSD,KFSS

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    nevermind found it..thanks anyway
  5. BSDaemon is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/21/2007 10:52pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ/MT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Wow!!
    Quote Originally Posted by fox
    The following review is the result of an evaluation of Martial Arts Skill and Attitude of Coda Scott, Stillwater Oklahoma.


    The main purpose of this review on the American Quan-Fa Association website is to assess the Traditional Arts which Coda Scott is supposed to have trained in and submit a fair, Honest and accurate review of said skills and of his attitude

    . The main styles we were observing were presented to be Tai Kwon Do and Okinawan Kenpo with claims being made to Eagle Claw Kung Fu and other forms of Chuan-fa / Quan-fa as well.
    The purpose of the overall review board was to provide a fair assessment of Coda Scot's presentation of himself as a black belt in the art of Okinawan Kenpo, also known as Ryukyu Kempo. Mr. Adam Hull organized this assessment at the request of Coda Scott.
    The review as presented below is the result of an agreement with Coda Scott the night before the demonstration. The agreement was simply for a fair and honest review of his black belt qualifications as related to the traditional arts for which he has represented himself a teacher or black belt.
    The following review will represent each board members observations as well as an overall review from the board as a whole. Our purpose is not to acknowledge, resend or award any rankings in any style nor is it to set in judgment of another, only to render an overview of our findings and to offer our opinions.
    While Coda Scott has trained along side or with some review board members, he has not trained under, or ranked under any member of the Review board
    Below are the observations of each board member. The comments and opinions of each board member are their own and may or may not reflect the exact opinions of other board members.

    Adam Hull, Kenpo:

    Mr. Scott’s Evaluation as seen by Adam J. Hull
    Stances:
    Positives: His demonstration of stances showed his knowledge and his abilities to present the material in a more than expectable way for students to learn.

    Negative/indifference: His physical conditioning did not allow for him to hold any deep traditional stances for very long or at least the length of time he felt needed for explaining the stance.
    Pivots:
    Indifference: As for pivots he did not make emphases on them while performing his stance work, nor while demonstrating his basic punches from a Square Horse which his style calls an Iron horse stance.


    Self-defense Techs:
    Positives: Self-defense skills and knowledge- His ability to explain what he was doing and his purpose for doing it was very well articulated and I do believe that a student of any level could follow his examples.

    Negative/indifference: His physical abilities to demonstrate his techs where of an intermediate level ability. This is expected of someone who has not had a training partner to help keep him sharp.

    His Techs seemed to be a mix of straight line and circular with some pressure point strikes and joint manipulation. His knowledge of said points was expectable.


    Forms:
    Positives: His TKD form Chun-Moo that he performed did begin and finish the form with the same amount of energy as he began with, even though it was a little different from what I’ve seen in the past from other TJD people, but he did give an expectable explanation I felt as to why it may be different.

    Negative/indifference: Again the form was fine, was it as powerful or as sharp as it could have been? No. He knew the form and could perform it, but at an intermediate level or a rusty advanced level at best at this time.

    Positives: Mr. Scott’s 2nd form was from his Okinawan Kenpo, he explained that his instructor Standford Sr. had combined two of the forms together to create the one that Scott learned and performed for us. Again Scott began and completed the form with the same amount of energy as before.

    Negative/indifference: As I had the opportunity to watch some video footage of one style of Okinawan Kenpo kata’s the night before, I did detect some similarities in his kata and the ones I’d seen. Where they the same? No. Is the kata true Okinawan Kenpo unsure. Thus I would grade him at an intermediate level in performance of this kata.

    Sparring:
    Positives: Mr. Scott sparred against 5 opponents, sparring time ranged from 1 to 2 minutes at max. His opponents ranged from beginner to advanced (those waiting to go for Black Belt). Scott’s control with the beginning belts was what I would have expected from an advanced belt. He did very well.

    Negative/indifference: As his opponents got tougher he went harder, but his ability dropped to an intermediate level.


    So What is Mr. Scott:

    To sum up Coda Scott displays physical skills and abilities of intermediate level at this time 3 Feb 07.

    Under such a strict overview he did fail to demonstrate the physical qualities of an advanced belt, He did impress all on the review board with the level of skill he did demo.

    His main style of Okinawan Kenpo based solely off the small portion that was demonstrated thus far would appear not to be a traditionally style, possibly with more demonstrations this first opinion could change.

    His TKD style, yes I would say it is of a traditional back ground. Just his physical skill is of intermediate level.


    This last part doesn’t really go with the whole neutral aspect of this written review the more I think about it. This part is more for us the ones connected with Scott and for Scott himself, so that he and us can see as he improves or chooses not to. Any thoughts???
    Attitude and Maturity:

    Scott’s still growing in this area, and by him being willing to prostrate himself to a group of people that do not truly know him or what he could do at his prime and the fact some on this board had and still have some grievances with him.

    Scott showed some restrain in his response towards the boards criticisms of his skills, knowledge and over all abilities. But he did fail to keep his emotions in check, but he is slowly coming around as to why his chosen response caused him to fail the over all evaluation and is in the slow process of working to do better.



    Billy Adkison, Kenpo:
    Stances:
    ...... not strong, too much bouncing in stances, cat stance was not a proper stance.

    Kicks:.... Better than I thought..

    Self defense:
    Intermediate level at best. Too many moves to complete the technique. Make it short and to the point.

    Throws:
    ........Could use more practice and control of opponent when executing his throws.

    Sparring:
    .....Control with white belt was okay....but not good with upper belt, he lost his control and threw a sweep when sweeps were not allowed. Relax and fight your fight.

    Overall:
    Whether Scott is or is not a black belt in his styles is not ours to say, but I believe he needs to work on all his techniques and be able to break them down. As far as his pressure points anybody can use the ones he showed but he needs to be able to tell the direction of them and how they affect different people Understand talking bad about people is bad and that is not what real martial artist do.


    Carson Bode, TKD:

    In his "Iron Horse Stance" his hands were in a pretty loose chamber, only pulled back to his stomach as opposed to his ribs as I was taught. His stance looked a bit "duck-footed" to me, with his toes 45degrees from forward instead of straight forward and his weight going into the ground at an angle instead of straight down, weakening his ankles.
    His side kicks were high, but didn't seem very refined. His chambers were shallow and he seemed to turn his back when he kicked. His kicking foot seemed bladed, but his supporting foot was at an odd angle, not 180 from the target.
    When he was demonstrating his punches and forward stance on the mat, his balance looked off, but this wasn't as apparent when he stepped onto the carpet. When shifting directions in this stance his feet remained at a 90-degree angle, thus my question as to whether he taught to roll his ankles when throwing a punch. He also brought his heel up when throwing a punch, more than would seem necessary for a strong pivot.
    I was only familiar with one of the kata he performed, but it seemed rather sloppy to me. His moves seemed rushed and not very crisp, and his stances high. His hands dropped when he kicked. Again, I am comparing this to my own training, but this did not seem like a "world champion" form.
    As for his self-defense, I can't claim a good deal of technical knowledge of self-defense techniques. I do question, however, if some of his techniques would have worked against a non-compliant opponent, namely one of the defenses that appeared similar to the Nikyo lock Dan does (Coda was forcing the arm, but not controlling the shoulder.)
    I didn't see anything impressive with his sparring; he wasn't controlling the ring very well. Going for a leg shot during his fight with Rex (one of his matches?) was a definite mark against him. I know that the sparring wasn't about stamina, and the way he was shaking after falling to his knees seems to support his claims of cardio-vascular problems (I've seen people who are simply out of shape spar and it didn't look like that.) But once again If he has this much trouble with demonstrating some fundamentals, running through some self defense, 2 katas, and about 10 minutes of sparring, he wouldn't have made it through my red-belt test. I don't see how he could've become a "world champion. While he does have a gift of gab and was able to explain basic principals, he didn't cover any higher-level theory or application, such as body alignment or combat position.
    Based on the skills he displayed, I would place Scot at intermediate level at best


    John Miller, Hung Gar Kung Fu:

    Stances:

    The Stances demonstrated were: Horse, Forward (right / left), cat and back stance. One stance I had expected to see based on Codas claims of Eagle Claw Kung Fu training was a Twisted, or Scissor stance which was not present. While he could briefly demo the deep stance, it lacked the proper chamber of the hands and foot position in most cases of traditional stances.

    Blocks:


    Coda demonstrated basic blocks including high, low and universal. I found the blocks to be solid and on an upper intermediate level. The main thing in my opinion holding the blocks to this level was the fact that most of the low blocks were demonstrated with extended elbow.

    Strikes and Kicks:

    Coda demonstrated strikes such as forward punch, reverse punch jab and ridg hand with solid execution. The speed and power of these techniques indicated to me the level of skill to be upper intermediate level. More focus on hip rotation for some strikes and better placement of striking surfaces, the latter mostly on ridge hand strikes would have elevated this opinion to some degree.

    The kicks Coda demonstrated included side kick, front kick, back kick and front thrust or snap kick. Kicks ranged from leg level to over his head and were executed with a fair degree of speed and power. While this portion of the demonstration was not well organized, demonstrating kicks in and around other techniques I observed sufficient skill to indicate, in my opinion an upper intermediate level of skill on these techniques, possibly even rusty advanced level.

    Self-defense Techniques:

    The self-defense portion of the demonstration I personally found lacking. The knife defense resulting in blade making contact with the back of Coda's neck as well as stabbing contact with ribs did not indicate a high degree of skill on knife defense. A second demonstration of knife defense looked to be more effective though still very risky as it involved stripping the knife from the attacker while in throwing motion chancing blade contact. While it is true that one is likely to be cut when attacked with a knife, we can take some precautions to avoid blade contact. The knife defense, in my opinion was beginner level at best.

    The gun defense was somewhat better. Coda focused on clearing the path of the pistil first and foremost. These techniques were good beginning techniques that anyone could easily learn and apply but not effective as stand alone techniques.

    Forms:

    The first form from the TKD style was Chun-Moo. While I personally do not know the TKD forms, this form looked to be well executed at an intermediate skill level. The stances were stronger than the earlier stance demo. The blocks, strikes and kicks were well formed with an acceptable degree of "snap" for the mentioned skill level.

    The next form was presented as a Kenpo form. The motions, stance work, blocks, strikes and kicks were well executed at an intermediate skill level. The techniques themselves were nearly 100% straight lined techniques looking very much like TKD. (More on this with the styles summery.)

    My overall opinion of the execution of the forms is at a rusty intermediate level.

    Styles Summery

    The styles in which Coda Scot claims rank are:
    Okinawan Kenpo: Second degree black.
    TKD: First degree black.
    Eagle Claw Kung Fu: Blue Sash.

    On the subject of Okinawan Kenpo:
    I personally do not hold a high rank in any kenpo, and no ranking in Okinawan Kenpo. I have, however, been privileged to train with and observe many artists from arts outside of my own style of Hung Gar Kung Fu, including the art of Kenpo. From my personal experience I would expect more circular techniques from Kenpo of any flavor than demonstrated by Coda Scott. Please refer to the evaluations by Kenpo instructors for a better explanation of the Kenpo System.

    TKD:
    From my observations, I would say the TKD presented was, while rusty, a traditional flavor of TKD. Again, one would do well to read from those qualified in TKD to form a solid opinion as to tradition or not on this art.

    Eagle Claw Kung Fu:
    While my arts are rooted more in the Tiger and Crane styles, we do have some eagle influence in our system.
    In my observation of Coda Scott’s demonstration, his stance work, hand formations and delivery of the strikes lacked most all of the trademark characteristics of the Eagle Claw or most any other style of Kung Fu.

    My overall assessment of Traditional Styles:
    Okinawan Kenpo: Not traditional
    TKD: Traditional
    Kung Fu: Not present

    Other styles previously indicated by Coda Scot as relevant were either not demonstrated or found sub par for the purposes of our evaluation.

    Grappling: Not demonstrated sufficiently. An arm bar was demonstrated drawing mixed responses from the board. It simply did not fall into an application of the technique that I would personally have used, i.e.; legs crossed over chest instead of crossing over throat or protecting from ankle lock.

    Iron Shirt: The prior comments about this training were not accurate, the explanation given indicated the basic "Breath out when hit" idea taught in most styles and had nothing to do with Iron Skills training.

    As for the other forms of Chuan-fa / Quan-fa Coda Scott claims to have trained: I see no evidence of such styles.


    Sparring:

    Coda Scot exercised an acceptable degree of control against the lower ranking opponents. The skill level against more experienced opponents proved to be less than what one would expect from a second-degree black belt. My opinion of the overall skill level displayed by Coda Scott while sparring I would term as rusty intermediate level at best.

    Ability to teach others:

    Coda showed the ability to explain his actions in such a manner as most any level of student could understand and learn the techniques presented. However, I will add to this that there is more to teaching others than the ability to express ones self. The ability to demonstrate the techniques effectively and the experience to discern what level of technique to teach has more to do with teaching than the explanation. More than that, Attitude and Maturity is the key factors to look for in a teacher of anything from Math to Martial Arts. More on this in the next section.

    Attitude and Maturity:
    The Attitude shown by Coda Scot was, to say the least, not what I would have expected from a black belt of any degree. When given instruction he often failed to follow the instruction as stated, instead performing his preference first. At times more than a second request was made for t he same demonstration or explanation. Personally, I would have expected more from a black belt of the second degree. The statements made by Coda after hearing the words of the review board were on the arrogant side to be certain, which brings me to the maturity side of my observation.

    A Mature black belt of any degree, in my opinion, should have the ability to follow instruction in a situation such as this. We had been asked there to perform a service for the benefit of Coda and to offer advice in the event we found him lacking in any area. From my position, his words cut as if he had done us a favor by allowing us into his dojo.

    The next thing concerning maturity involves an attack on the knee of one of the sparing partners. This knee had been injured some months ago during a test in which the young man was promoted to brown belt. The sweep alone would not have drawn much attention even though joint damaging strikes were not allowed during sparing, but for the facts surrounding the event.

    1. Coda had a prior issue with the young man in question.
    2. Coda had indicated that he did not want the young man present.
    3. Coda did not attempt that particular technique on any of the other opponents.
    4. Coda knew the knee was bad.

    After the matches, Coda offered an explanation, which I take was an attempt at an apology, but like his closing statements to the review board lacked the attitude one would expect in the situation.

    My overall opinion:

    First, I will admit that Coda Scott preformed much better than I expected him to. I do not believe I am alone in this opinion as I heard several words indicating the same from other review board members both during and after the evaluation.

    Techniques and execution: All things considered my assessment of the skills demonstrated by Coda is that of a rusty intermediate level student, not that of a black belt.
    I do not base my opinion on the skill level alone. I have known several teachers who taught only basic knowledge and techniques, never claiming to hold high rankings themselves. My opinion is based mostly on the attitude and maturity level I observed from Coda.

    These are my opinions and may not be the exact opinions of others on the review board.
    .

    Tom Fox, American Karate and Kung Fu San Soo also Tang Soo Do

    Stances:
    ...... Not strong, too much bouncing in stances, cat stance was not a proper stance.

    Kicks:
    .... He had a good side kick

    Self defense:
    Intermediate level at best, requiring to many moves to complete the technique.

    Throws:
    ........Could use more practice and control of opponent when executing his throws.

    Sparring:
    .....Control with white belt was okay....but not good with upper belt, he lost his control and threw a sweep when sweeps were not allowed and the only one Scott threw the sweep on was one that he new had a bad knee.

    Overall:
    .....He did better than I had seen him do in the past, but still a rusty intermediate belt at best.

    Finally... after we had given Scott our opinions, Scott basically attacked us and pointed 4 of us out and made slighting comments about us. This made for a complete failure in my opinion.

    Thad Brady, Shotokan Karate:

    First off I would like to comment on his techniques and stances.
    · His performance of such was weak. He didn’t know the proper names of stances. Also didn’t know what they were designed for, nor how to proper use them in certain situations and the effectiveness of one over another.
    · Techniques were limited to roundhouse and side snap kicks. I didn’t see any front kicks. For self-proclaimed Black belt of 2nd Dan, there should have been more knowledge and usage of more than 3 techniques.
    · If he was testing for 3rd Dan, he lacked sharpness, smoothness and NO power behind any of his techniques.
    Katas.
    · It was a weak performance, he displayed no proper hip rotation, nor did he incorporate any hip rotations in his techniques while performing katas. That is all I can comment, due to my limited knowledge of Tae Kwon Do and Kenpo.
    Self-defense strategies.
    · His techniques he displayed were not practically under any real situation. Looked as if was taken from a Jackie Chan movie.
    · If either gun or knife techniques were ever used outside of his dojo, I feel it could result in either injury or death of his student(s).
    · Needs more work and proper knowledge of both knife and gun self defense.
    · The techniques looked as if displayed "flashy" for the crowd. Looked as if shown in manner to give the crowd as "good show".
    · On one of the non-weapon techniques shown, he attempted to look good yet it came out looking weak. He struggled as he tried to escape from a behind choke hold.
    His knowledge of other styles of Martial Arts.
    · Judo- He displayed no knowledge of throws. His students lacked proper knowledge of falling. His knowledge on proper setting of hands, feet, and hips was lacking.
    · Jiu-Jitsu- He was limited to two arm bars. No proper execution of such. His techniques could be easily broken and escaped from.
    · He lacked the origin of many of the styles he claimed to be studying. He needs to be serious in studying any style of Martial Arts.
    · Have better documentation of style and techniques he claims to possess or to be studying.
    Sparring
    · He did display good control while sparring. But was his "control" based up on his lack of power? After reviewing the tape, he showed lack of power.
    The overall review he DOES NOT possess knowledge of Black Belt. He posses the knowledge of a GREEN belt and nothing higher. He needs to use practical techniques over any aspects of Marital Arts, instead of being flashy or giving everyone around him a "good show".

    *Note: Being upon this review and being a Black Belt I have separated my personal feelings from my professional mind as I came into this review. Any personal feelings I had toward Coda Scott were "left at the door". My review was based upon seeing first hand his techniques.

    I do believe that when he was given the chance to speak, he inappropriately pointed out 4 of the board members having a "personal vendetta" against him. This was uncalled for and was not appropriate for this event. This kind of action once again showed his lack of maturity for a "Black Belt"/ instructor.

    I believe that any instructors that have been currently (2004-2006) promoted by either Coda and/or Gee Tanner should be reviewed.

    Allen Little Sun: Kenpo / TKD

    WELL FIRST AND FOREMOST DURING THE TIME AT CODA SCOTTS REVIEW I WAS VERY DISAPOINTED. I WAS HOPING I WAS GOING TO SEE ALL OF HIS TECHNIQUES, BUT ONLY SAW VERY LITTLE.

    STANCES - HIS IRON HORSE STANCE WAS PRETTY GOOD BUT THAT WAS ABOUT IT. KENPO HAS SEVERAL OTHER STANCES, WHICH HE DID NOT SHOW. HE COULD EXPLAIN THEM BUT DID NOT SHOW BUT ONE.

    kicks - ANYONE WHO HAS STUDIED KENPO SHOULD KNOW THAT WE DO NOT KICK ANY HIGHER THEN THE NECK, IN OTHER WORDS WE DO NOT KICK TO THE HEAD AREA. IF YOU RECALL HER WAS KICKING TO THE HEAD. TAE KWON DO TEACHES TO KICK THE HEAD AREA BUT I DID NOT RECALL HIM SAYING ANYTHING ABOUT HIS TAE KWON DO STUDIES AND IF HE DID THEN I MUST HAVE MISSED IT.

    SELF DEFENSE - THE SELF DEFENSE WAS VERY WEAK, KENPO SELF DEFENSE FROM WHITE BELT TO SECOND DEGREE BLACK BELT WILL HAVE APPROX: 150 TO 200 DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES BUT ALL HE COULD SHOW US WAS 5 AT THE MOST. AS WE KNOW SELF DEFENSE IS TO SHOW WHAT TO DO IN A REALISTIC SITUATION WHEN HE SHOWED THE WEAPON DEFENSE, IT LOOKED LIKE HE WAS HOPING HE COULD GET OUT OF THE WAS OF THE BLADE OR GUN, LOOKED LIKE HE WAS NOT SURE ON WHAT TO DO.

    JU JITSU - WHEN IT CAME TO THE JU JITSU TECHNIQUES HE KNEW VERY LITTLE, WHEN HE DID THE ARM BAR ANY BODY COULD HAVE GOTTEN OUT OF THAT ARM LOCK. HE WAS TOO FAR AWAY FROM THE BODY TO EXECUTEE A PROPER ARM LOCK.

    SPARRING - WHEN IT CAME TO THE SPARRING HE WAS VERY OUT OF SHAPE, HE WAS OUT OF CONTROL ON ALL HIS TECHNIQUES, IT LOOKED LIKE HE WAS JUST THROWING TECHNIQUES HOPING TO HIT SOMEONE. HE MUST BE IN CONTROL OF HIS TECHNIQUES AT ALL TIMES. HE WAS GETTING TIRED AND FRUSTRATED AND LOST CONTROL OF HIS TEMPER, AS I HAVE TOLD ALL MY STUDENTS IF YOU LOSE CONTROL THEN YOU LOST ALL RESPECT OF THE MARTIAL ARTS.

    FORMS - WHEN IT CAME TO THE FORMS I WAS NOT IMPRESSED, THE TAE KWON DO FORM HE SHOWED, HE DID NOT HAVE THE CRISP AND SNAP WHAT SO EVER. WAS NOT SURE ON THE KENPO FORM, AS WE KNOW KENPO CAME FROM CHINA, JAPAN, OKINAWA, HAWAII AND THEN TO AMERICA. THERE ARE SEVERAL KENPO FORMS BUT NEVER SEEN THE ONE HE PERFORMED.

    WELL I COULD GO ON FOR EVER BUT I WILL SUM IT ALL UP. MR.SCOTT HAS WHAT WE CALL BOOK KNOWLEDGE BUT AS FAR AS THE TECHNIQUES THERE WAS NONE SHOWN FOR A 2ND DEGREE BLACK BELT, HE WOULD BE CONSIDERED A INTERMEDIATE LEVEL.

    Jonathan Potter: American Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan Tae Kwan Do, American Freestyle

    On Saturday, February 3rd, 2007, I was witness to and participated in the evaluation of Coda Scott in regards to his martial arts skills. Following are my thoughts and opinions of the evaluation of Coda Scott.

    Before I start on my thoughts of Coda Scott’s performance I’ll mention a few things about the evaluation. I feel that the evaluation could have gone a little better, namely in the amount of time, or the way in which the time was handled. This was partly due to Coda Scott as well as the execution of the evaluation. Mr. Scott was a little longer winded then necessary on a few points during the evaluation; this combined with, what I felt, was insufficient time for Coda to fully demonstrate everything. All these factors led to the evaluation not being as comprehensive as it could have been.

    The evaluation also led to some peculiarities in the way Mr. Scott preformed his techniques. This I will elaborate a little more on in my opinions of his performance, but I think I would have been happier with it being organized a little more as an actual test with only a very few demonstrations of his ability to explain techniques. I realize, of course, that there are not many evaluations done, and it was a little difficult for everyone involved, and I do feel that for what it was, it was handled in a very professional and respectful way.

    Stances
    Coda Scott first demonstrated his stances. They appeared to be fine, though I didn’t notice a little bobbing. While he was bobbing in his stances, he was also taking the time to explain them, and I feel that some of it might have been due to this peculiarity.

    His stances seemed strong, and adequate for someone of an advanced belt.

    Blocks
    The blocks he preformed are similar to the blocks that I have learned in my styles`, with a uniqueness in his style. The uniqueness of his style being that each block has 3 levels to it.

    Overall, I felt his blocks were adequate, that of an advanced belt for what he was able to demonstrate. His explanation of each block was very good.

    Punches/Strikes
    Mr. Scott did not end up show a great deal of punches or strikes with his hands. I felt that this portion of the evaluation was lacking in length, and would have liked to see a great deal more of strikes, or even seeing him moving down the room combining punches and strikes and maybe even kicks.

    His ability to perform the punches and strikes would place him around an upper intermediate to advanced ranking.

    Kicks
    Again, with the time given, there were not many kicks demonstrated. As I mentioned in the “Punches/Strikes” section, I would have liked to see him moving down the room, showing combinations. His side kick is what I recall the most, and it seemed to be very well executed. I would have liked a demonstration of power via break boards or hitting a shield.

    Only because I was unable to see more kicks, and higher level kicks, or explanations of their execution; I would rate Mr. Scott at a more intermediate level on kicks. Again, if I had been given more to watch, this might change.

    Self-Defense
    Overall, I was most disappointed in this section. I was not disappointed in it because of reasons that others on the board mentioned, but because I have worked out and taught with Mr. Scott for some time, and I know that he could have done a much better job in this area then what he demonstrated. His ability to explain a situation and what you would need to do in seemed to be very well done. However, he gave only a few limited demonstrations. When it came to the knife self-defense, I was not as impressed. I thought it was good that he said you should keep your arms up, and that you might as well accept that you are going to be cut, but the actual ways in which he removed the knife were not the best. His gun self-defense seemed to be good to me, though I would have liked to see a few more.

    Based on what I saw at the evaluation, I would rate Mr. Scott at only a rusty intermediate level. However, based on some of the teachings I’ve seen him do outside of the evaluation I would rate him at an advanced level.

    Sparring
    I was impressed with Coda Scott’s ability to spar with the various fighters. The second fighter was particularly hard at the start. I thought Mr. Scott was able to handle himself well. It was very clear that this fight took a lot out of him, and his other fights were not nearly as good. During his fight with one of his matches I noticed that he did a sweep on him. I thought it very odd at the time. Later I found out that his sparing partner had a bad knee, and that the sweep might have been related to that. Whether it was or not is not my place to say, but I defiantly think he stepped out of bounds doing a sweep.

    Based on the sparring I did see, I would rate Mr. Scott at a rusty advanced level.

    Overall
    I was both impressed and disappointed. On one end, I thought that Mr. Scott did very well on the evaluation. It wasn’t an easy thing to do, and I’m sure it was hard deciding what to demonstrate. I would probably rate him around a rusty advanced level based on his performance at the evaluation. I believe that with more time to refine and get in shape, he could do a much better job and demonstrating what he knows in his head.

    Mr. Scott is not in the best shape, and I think this is one of his bigger hindrances. It’s something that is easy to have happen, especially when you are concentrating more on instructing then practicing the martial arts.

    At the end of the evaluation, Mr. Scott gave a speech. At the start of the speech, I was about ready to pull my hair out with the way it seemed like he was talking. Towards the end though, it was much better. To this degree, I feel that Mr. Scott still has some maturing to do in certain areas of his life. In some areas, he is very mature and well rounded. I believe he has a lot of potential as an instructor, and as long as he continues to pursue bettering himself, the best can happen.

    Based solely on what I was able to see at the evaluation, I would be forced to rate Mr. Scott around an upper intermediate to rather rusty advanced. Advanced can include black belt level in my mind. Again, I would like to say that if we had been able to see more my rating of Mr. Scott might have been quite a bit higher.




    Group Overview. As of 03 / FEB / 2007.

    As stated at the beginning of this review, it is not our purpose to acknowledge, resend or grant any rank in any style to Coda Scott. Our purpose is only to assess the skill level of his techniques and his attitude as black belt or not, and give our recommendations so he may better himself if possible and if he so chooses.

    One thing we must point out is that Coda Scott did impress the group in as much as he did better than anyone thought he would do. He showed more technique and ability than most of us had ever seen from him in the past and for this we give him credit where credit is due.

    So, where does Mr. Scott rank in the opinion of the evaluation group?


    Based on the input from all board members, it is our collective opinion that Coda Scot has had training of some degree. As to the nature of the training and ranks he may or may not have held from a given instructor, we cannot in honesty comment in any depth.


    The reason for this is the fact that with so many instructors teaching so many different arts, we have no way of knowing the requirements any instructor or organization may place on a student to achieve a given rank. On the question of the skill level of Coda Scott, it is the overall opinion of the evaluation group that he would fall into an intermediate skill level, with most feeling that he would be rusty intermediate, some observing as high as rusty advanced skill level.

    Some Key points that bring us to this decision follow.

    1. While he knew some stance work, he was not as rooted in his stances as one would expect from a black belt in traditional styles such as TKD and Kenpo.
    2. The limited number of techniques and stances do not support our opinion of black belt level instructor.
    3. Attitude and maturity is lacking.
    This third point seems to be the biggest in the eyes of the group. While we all understand the following points, attitude is something that is a must for any instructor of any degree.

    Some instructors may begin to neglect personal training once they begin training others.
    One may loose much of their training due to lack of practice.
    It is possible that those he trained under did not have the same requirements as those of our group.

    Understanding these things, as well as acknowledging Coda’s ability to convey information as an instructor, most would see no problem with A person simply sharing what they have learned, with proper attitude and maturity even in the absence of any credential as long as said instructor confined teaching to those aspects which prove effective and which they could properly teach to others.

    The most relevant points of our decision are rooted in attitude and maturity because of:
    A. the closing statements of Mr. Scott
    This evaluation was organized by Mr. Hull at the request of Coda Scott, and yet he made a very obvious statement that we were there because he “Allowed” us to be.
    While the evaluation group had all been instructed to leave past issues “at the door” and evaluate what was presented, Coda felt the need to touch on the fact that many in the group had past issues with him and almost seemed like he was attempting to draw a debate at one point. This showed a lack of maturity and a less than desirable attitude from one wishing to be acknowledged as a black belt or as an instructor.

    B. The event mentioned by some of the evaluation group concerning the leg sweep.
    As stated above, there are a few facts surrounding this event.

    1. Leg kicks were not permitted unless we had taken the time to assure that both Coda, and his opponents could maintain proper control for such techniques. This had not been established due to time restraints.
    2. The recipient of the sweep had an injury to the very knee that was targeted.
    3. Coda had a past issue with the opponent.
    4. Coda knew the knee was injured.

    For most, this was the final demonstration of technique, attitude and maturity that brought us to the conclusion of a sub black belt level. Had the sweep been properly executed the young man would have received much more damage to the knee. While the targeting was off to some point as well as power, the effect was still noticeable to all present.

    This brings up the overall opinion of the sparring in general, which left a bit to be desired. While we could take into account the rather obvious problem with endurance and heart issues, some shortcomings were still noted.

    1. When sparing the lower belts, we expected to see some more advanced techniques. This is the time when one may show a wider range of techniques that may not be effective against more skilled opponents. Our observations indicated basic sparing skills with no variation of techniques from lower to upper belt opponents
    2. . The control issues as mentioned above became obvious during sparing.
    Overall, the sparing, while using basic techniques was executed at an intermediate level at best with the endurance and control issues bringing this down considerably in our opinion.

    On the subject of traditional styles:
    The TKD form presented to us, while not executed at a black belt skill level, was a traditional black belt TKD form (Chun-Mo) Giving to the fact that most instructors adapt the forms to themselves we are willing to grant that the TKD is of traditional origin and of a rusty intermediate skill level.

    The Kenpo form was not familiar to any of the evaluation group and did not appear to be traditional Okinawan Kenpo. Skill level in this style not confirmed as the style has not been confirmed. The execution of the techniques themselves looked to be intermediate level.

    The Kung Fu training mentioned by Coda at the level of blue sash was not found. The execution of hand techniques and lack of stance work indicates no traditional kung fu training to be present in his style(s)

    The Iron shirt mentioned by Coda was presented with a revised description and has nothing to do with iron skills training. Instead the technique is basic “breath out when hit”.

    In the event that, in our opinion, Coda is found lacking in overall black belt qualifications, this evaluation was to include recommendations from the group as to how Coda may better himself and his martial skills.

    The recommendations of this evaluation group would be as such.

    1. Take no thought of public opinion, but rather focus on personal skills and attitude.
    2. Revise attempts to gain respect. Instead of making claims about ones self, or against others, simply improve yourself and avoid issues whenever possible.
    3. Choose a style in which to excel and train in one style until such a time as a black belt is achieved to the qualifications of both instructor and student.
    Assistance has been offered by some members of this evaluation group, and according to personal conversations between Mr. Adam Hull and Coda Scott.
  6. fox is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
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    Location
    Oklahoma
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    716

    Posted On:
    3/21/2007 10:58pm


     Style: American Karate,TSD,KFSS

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for posting that long drawn out thread...I wonder where kickcatcher got his info on it ? There is a vid, but it is not up to me to post it. It is up to BoxingBear or Adam Hull.
    Last edited by fox; 3/21/2007 11:01pm at . Reason: need to add more
  7. El Neko is offline
    El Neko's Avatar

    "Yes Neko, please keep telling me more about your manly collection of Star Wars audiobooks"

    Join Date
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    Boca Raton
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    Posted On:
    3/21/2007 11:07pm

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by fox
    nevermind found it..thanks anyway
    Can you post it?
    Quote Originally Posted by Phrost View Post
    Yeah, you're probably right.

    But still, something about having a black guy or a lesbian jump out from behind a garbage can yelling "SURPRISE GONG SAU" at any of your big-named RBSD kooks makes me giggle like a little girl.
    Quote Originally Posted by Phrost
    There are two kinds of members on MAP:

    1. LARPers/Partial Artists
    2. People who haven't heard about Bullshido.
    The Mighty McClaw to Fox when refusing to fight AnnaT.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheMightyMcClaw
    Don't fight girls? When are you living, the 1850's? I suppose you think they shouldn't work or vote either.
    Get with the times and punch a chick.
    Wingchundo's response after I called him a "*****"

    Quote Originally Posted by wingchundo View Post
    Hey, I resemble that remark!

    Ok, time for a snappy comeback.... uh...

    OK. Here goes.

    You are what you eat!
  8. fox is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
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    Oklahoma
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    Posted On:
    3/21/2007 11:12pm


     Style: American Karate,TSD,KFSS

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The facebook.com ? You need to register and look up his name..It only shows what he wants for his B-Day. Look him up on myspace..he still claims to be a 2nd degree in Freestyle Karate..must have been over the phone, or gave it to himself.
    Last edited by fox; 3/21/2007 11:35pm at .
  9. boxingbear is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
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    Posted On:
    3/22/2007 1:58am


     Style: Shotokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I found this when I typed in Coda Scott in Facebook. This from i guess a student/instructor.

    Personal Info
    Activities: I am the Grappling Instructor for True Power Martial Arts Academy.
    I train in Bushido Kai. (Bushido Kai Karate Kenpo-way of the empty handed, hard bodied warrior) Under Mr. Coda Scott.


    Work Info
    Employer: True Power Martial Arts Academy
    Position: Grappling Instructor
    Time Period: December 2007 – Present
    Location: Stillwater, OK
    Description: I teach collegiate and freestyle wrestling, Judo and Jujitsu. (I am still training in Judo, and Jujitsu from our Senior Instructor)


    WTF!?? HARD-BODIED WARRIOR?!? And who is his senior instructor? LMAO! :karated: :laughing7 am i an a$$hole or what??
  10. Olorin is offline
    Olorin's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
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    2,055

    Posted On:
    3/22/2007 2:07am

    supporting memberhall of fame
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Coda is like a zombie, you think you kill it but it just keeps stumbling forward…
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