222000 Bullies, 4165 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 11 to 20 of 47
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12 345 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. elbowtko is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    133

    Posted On:
    3/28/2007 1:44pm


     Style: Muay Thai, No Gi Judo/Bjj

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A good move would be the cross face, where you have little choice but to basicly push your hand (or glove) in thier face from the inside inorder to create room for your other hand to get in.

    Typically I find it much easier to move my partner when I hold on thier neck (or when I need to create room to swim with my other hand), however when I actually do obtain a locked position I move up to the the back of head. So only when I do plan to lock something and not continously fight for superior inside control ( which does not happen often...) I move to the upper part of the head. The more you practice, I more you natrual feel the need to move your hand higher or lower.

    Grabing underneath the tricept and then moving underneath is a particularly great move to get your opponent into a side postion for a good knee strike. This is particularly usefull when opponents ultilize the cross face, where they keep thier arm in your face for too long and you take advantage of this by using his same force thats pushing your face to push his tricept over and gain a side position to knee his ribs.

    Grabing underneath tricepts also must be done quickly, due to elbow strikes (unless of course you don't practice those rules... its still something to keep in mind. )
  2. PPlate is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,083

    Posted On:
    3/28/2007 11:34pm


     Style: Muay Thai, Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by M1K3
    Do you know any wrestlers, espically Greco? They have some drills called pummeling which is for establishing clinch control. Sounds to me like the techniques are very similar. Mark Hatmaker has a good MMA book on clinch fighting which includes these drills. Sorry, I'm at work now and don't remember the name, I think is is something like "Clinch Fighting", and no that wasn't a joke. Hope this helps.
    Thanks for contributing. I've done BJJ so I'm familiar with pummelling.
  3. PPlate is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,083

    Posted On:
    3/28/2007 11:38pm


     Style: Muay Thai, Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for the tips everyone, I really like the ducking under the elbow thing, and also the posting on the face thing.

    Oh, just to share, another tip I was taught by my coach was to scrunch my shoulders up towards my neck, and try to be Jabba the Hutt. No neck, no hand hold for opponent. Works very well.
  4. PPlate is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,083

    Posted On:
    3/28/2007 11:45pm


     Style: Muay Thai, Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark
    I for one do NOT agree with your coach on that hand position thing. If I have one hand in I am definitely going to move up their head and get my elbow down in the right position.
    Actually, you can also push the elbows down on his chest when you're holding his neck. I find that it gives me a more secure hold while I'm attempting to snake the other arm in.

    If I grab the back of his head, his hair makes it slippery, plus if he moves his head to the side, I'll lose my grip. The neck on the other hand gives a good grip.


    otherwise I don't have the leverage to move them around and get my second hand in. My favorite trick is to throw a fast but not hard knee to the side that you don't have control of yet. As long as you don't over commit and get dumped you can get your hand in on that side when they go to defend the knee.
    I actually feel the opposite. If I hold on to the back of the head, I cannot move him around as the only force I can exert on him by using his head, is pushing his head down.

    If I hook my hand around his neck and grab the neck, for e.g. if I use my left hand to grab the back of his neck, I can either 1) step with my right foot forward beside or slightly behind is left foot, then pull his neck to spin him counterclockwise (wrt me).

    Or I can 2) step back with my left foot and again pull his neck to spin him counterclockwise.

    If I hold the back of his head, I can do neither.

    What do you think?
  5. Torakaka is offline
    Torakaka's Avatar

    Do you eat breakfast?

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kaka village
    Posts
    10,658

    Posted On:
    3/28/2007 11:49pm

    supporting member
     Style: Kitty Pow Pow!!!

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    One thing I will often resort to when I don't really want to waste energy fighting for a neck clinch is throw one arm over their shoulder and the other arm underhooked and the hands gable gripped behind the back. While it doesn't put you in quite as juicy a spot for throwing knees, it's a much easier position to grab, and most people don't seem to defend against it well. Also, since you have control of one of the arms it leaves that side nice and open for knees, though it takes a bit more effort and flexibility to throw a decent knee from this position.
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm
  6. alex is offline
    alex's Avatar

    STOP POSTING!

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    8,184

    Posted On:
    3/29/2007 7:11am

    supporting member
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    [QUOTE=PPlate]Actually, you can also push the elbows down on his chest when you're holding his neck. I find that it gives me a more secure hold while I'm attempting to snake the other arm in.

    If I grab the back of his head, his hair makes it slippery, plus if he moves his head to the side, I'll lose my grip. The neck on the other hand gives a good grip.
    [/quote[ work on not having a sucky grip. back of the head>neck

    I actually feel the opposite. If I hold on to the back of the head, I cannot move him around as the only force I can exert on him by using his head, is pushing his head down.
    whats wrong with your arms that you cant do the same thing you are doing to his neck? im not following.

    If I hook my hand around his neck and grab the neck, for e.g. if I use my left hand to grab the back of his neck, I can either 1) step with my right foot forward beside or slightly behind is left foot, then pull his neck to spin him counterclockwise (wrt me).

    Or I can 2) step back with my left foot and again pull his neck to spin him counterclockwise.

    If I hold the back of his head, I can do neither.

    What do you think?
    I think you need to work on your clinch more.
  7. Khun Kao is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Washington, D.C.
    Posts
    638

    Posted On:
    3/29/2007 7:23am


     Style: MuayThai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think he's misinterpretting what we're talking about when we refer to the back of the head. From the sounds of it, he seems to be thinking of the TOP of the head. When we are referring to the "back of the head", we are referring to the base of the skull, just slightly above where the vertebrae attach to your brain case...
  8. Khun Kao is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Washington, D.C.
    Posts
    638

    Posted On:
    3/29/2007 7:34am


     Style: MuayThai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This isn't the greatest picture, but its the best one I could find quickly.



    This is very close to what we mean when we are referring to clinching the back of someone's head and not their neck. The guy on the left does NOT have his hands on his opponents neck. They are slightly above his neck and at the base of the skull. That subtle shift in your hand position makes a HUGE difference in your ability to control your opponent in a clinch!
  9. Khun Kao is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Washington, D.C.
    Posts
    638

    Posted On:
    3/29/2007 7:41am


     Style: MuayThai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Again, this next picture is not very good, but you should be able to see the differene in hand position...



    you should be able to see in the 1st picture how the guy on the left is able to dig his forearms and elbows into the collarbone area of his opponent. He uses this as a fulcrum when applying the clinch to trap his opponents head. But in the 2nd picture, where his hands are obviously on the back of the neck, you can see his elbows/forearms are out of position to apply the same pressure, which makes an ineffective clinch.

    I apologize for these pictures being poor illustrations of what we are talking about, but its the best I have access to right now. These were from a photoshoot I did 2 years ago for a generic article on some clinch techniques. The pictures don't *exactly* fit our current discussion, but I thought they'd help give us a reference point to work from.
  10. WhiteShark is offline
    WhiteShark's Avatar

    1% Shark is better than you.

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Atlanta GA
    Posts
    9,179

    Posted On:
    3/29/2007 8:19am

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Khun Kao to the rescue again! That is exactly what I was talking about.

    Another very important difference that IS illustrated by those pictures is the head position of the guy in the tank top. See where his eyes are pointing? When you move up to the head and keep your elbows down your make their head tilt forward. That is the first step in breaking your opponents posture. That ability is completely absent if you grab their neck.
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12 345 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.