230588 Bullies, 3778 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 42
Page 1 of 5 1 2345 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Teh El Macho is offline
    Teh El Macho's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Porcupine/Hollywood, FL & Parmistan via Elbonia
    Posts
    11,762

    Posted On:
    3/27/2007 5:42pm

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Triangular Footwork/Filipino Boxing Clips

    I was originally looking for anything on triangular footwork, and so far this is the clearest clip I've found on the subject:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jse6aKkehC8

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jse6aKkehC8

    That clip was fine in explaining triangular footwork (somewhat), but I didn't quite dig the other clips by the author/owner. Plus, I rack my brains when I see the instructor with his foot together at the base of the triangle. From the brief stuff I learned (and from what appears to me as plain common sense), you avoid your feet to be like that at all costs - maybe the instructor is using that starting position to simplify the discussion.

    Further searches led me to the following clip.

    Filipino Boxing:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gAiWxdC-uY8

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gAiWxdC-uY8

    I don't know if this should have been in Strikeistan, though. The first one might be since it's explaining a specific technique. The second one might not be since it's more like a hightlight... oh **** it, I dunno.
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  2. selfcritical is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    austin, tx
    Posts
    2,428

    Posted On:
    3/28/2007 5:04pm


     Style: Pekiti, ARMA, other stuff

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Disclaimer- I can't see the clips from work

    The triangle drills are supposed to teach two things

    a. moving at 45 degree angles to both evade and approach
    b. getting comfortable evading or angling off of either lead

    While the feet come together in the drill, I almost never see anyone have that part of the drill pop up in sparring, particularly if the person doing it has repped takeoffs.
  3. Chili Pepper is offline
    Chili Pepper's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,232

    Posted On:
    3/29/2007 9:43am


     Style: Siling Labuyo Arnis

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by El Macho
    Plus, I rack my brains when I see the instructor with his foot together at the base of the triangle. From the brief stuff I learned (and from what appears to me as plain common sense), you avoid your feet to be like that at all costs - maybe the instructor is using that starting position to simplify the discussion.
    Pretty much - he's putting his feet in a neutral position, so there's no difference when he shows a step to the left or to the right. There are quite a few FMA that don't put a lot of emphasis on maintaining a left or right lead so it's possible it stems from that.

    Lots of people train very regularly like that, though; a bad habit in my eyes. Sure, do it a couple times to get the idea of splitting to the left or right, but very quickly the student will need to do it from the sort of stance he normally fights out of.
  4. Naszir is offline
    Naszir's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    ATX
    Posts
    1,194

    Posted On:
    3/29/2007 9:52am


     Style: BJJ, Judo, SAMBO

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Just to echo what has been said so far. The feet rarely, if ever, come together like that in what I have seen or done. You angle away or cut to a side so you have a good but mobile base. The triangle footwork should never be static or off balance.
  5. selfcritical is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    austin, tx
    Posts
    2,428

    Posted On:
    3/29/2007 3:19pm


     Style: Pekiti, ARMA, other stuff

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Watched both clips, they both looked ok to me. The guys in the second one were alright standup, hand positions made a pretty big pipe in the center though.

    Also, their body mechanics for the stick made it look like they hit like sissies.
    Last edited by selfcritical; 3/29/2007 5:16pm at .
  6. Escrima9 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London
    Posts
    305

    Posted On:
    5/30/2007 10:23am


     Style: EC, BJJ n00b

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Disclaimer - also cannot see clips from work (I'll look later)

    I was going to post asking about triangular footwork but did a search first to avoid "search n00b" :P

    I went to my first official pancrase class a couple of weeks back and while sparring all I could really do were the few take down defences and basic stuff I learnt that class or stuff I've picked up here and there along the way. My footwork was triangular and I used point to point. Which is the bringing your foot in (to your point) while stepping out with the other foot (angling off).

    We fight from our "point" feet together, so that we have no stance. Just stand as you would waiting for a bus or whatever then explode from there. While sparring or in competition we step through our point most of the time. But to do that you still have to learn the basic step to your point, step off..rinse and repeat first.

    Using triangular footwork and off-lining seemed to work just fine while sparring unarmed and quite a few of the "weapon strike" angles threw people off as they weren't used to being hit that way.

    Again I can't see the clip so I don't know if the guy is hitting only with arm or using a falling step and or body to get behind his weapon to generate power. though I'd agree that a lot of Kali guys hit with flicks rather than smashing the stick into their opponent. Hopefully I'll remember to take a look later.
  7. Otaku Waffle is offline
    Otaku Waffle's Avatar

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Mechelen-Belgium
    Posts
    925

    Posted On:
    10/05/2007 5:50am


     Style: Kali/Jun Fan/CSW

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Naszir
    Just to echo what has been said so far. The feet rarely, if ever, come together like that in what I have seen or done. You angle away or cut to a side so you have a good but mobile base. The triangle footwork should never be static or off balance.
    Our instructor usually shows it starting from a position with feet together but as soon as we're walking the triangle/hourglass, we're not supposed to have our feet together at any point in the drill (for obvious mobility and stability issues).

    Yeayea, necro'd an old thread...but someone has to stand up to the Ke?po torrent of threads. :-)
  8. IndoChinese is offline

    AKAKTK

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    angola, ny
    Posts
    2,047

    Posted On:
    10/10/2007 9:14pm


     Style: Liu Seong Gung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    neutral stance training is vital to make your responses from an everday/natural position.

    if you have to take up a stance first, you will be way too slow.

    while your 'settin up a lead', you will get chopped.

    sparring is a different matter.

    dont confuse the two.

    regards,

    ktk
  9. Bolverk is offline

    Ex-ATA and Proud of it.

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Chicken Town
    Posts
    910

    Posted On:
    10/11/2007 1:10pm


     Style: Jeet Kune Do

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Pretty basic stuff there. It would be common for the feet to start in a neutral position. The feet also come together in replacement steps as well. The basic idea to the female triangle is to move at 45° angles to the attack. Very few lateral movements are used in triangular footwork.
    Last edited by Bolverk; 10/11/2007 1:14pm at .
    Knowing it is not enough, we must apply.
    Willing is not enough, we must do.

    Never approach a Bull from the front, a Horse from the rear, or a Fool from any direction!

    He who dares not offend cannot be honest. -- Thomas Payne
  10. Red Elvis is offline
    Red Elvis's Avatar

    Da Komrads... Again you are MadPelvisOwn3d!

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Soviet State Of Kalifornia
    Posts
    2,201

    Posted On:
    10/11/2007 10:08pm

    supporting member
     Style: Spetsnaz Shovel-Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bolverk
    Very few lateral movements are used in triangular footwork.
    Actually, I've seen a lot of lateral movement in FMA footwork. When you say few are you referring to the number of possibilties or the actual usage?
    .
    :icon_twis
    .

    To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence;
    Supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without spilling your Guinness.
    Sun "Fu Man JhooJits" Tzu, the Art of War & Guinness
Page 1 of 5 1 2345 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.