232461 Bullies, 3991 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 11 to 20 of 32
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 12 34 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. truepwrz is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    773

    Posted On:
    3/21/2007 2:20pm


     Style: Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    reply launched =) thanks alot el macho
  2. Asriel is offline
    Asriel's Avatar

    I'd like to leave this world like I came into it: Screaming, naked & covered in someone else's blood

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    3,795

    Posted On:
    3/22/2007 5:09am

    supporting member
     Style: Muay Thai (BJJ hiatus)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks a lot for the info my friend :) I'll have a proper read a bit later.
    " The reason elite level MMAists don't fight with aikido is the same reason elite level swimmers don't swim with their lips." - Virus

    " I shocked him with my skills on the ice becuase Wing Chun is great for hockey fighting." - 'Sifu' Milt Wallace

    "Besides, as you might already know (from Virus, for example) - there's only 1 wing chun and it sucks big time" - Tonuzaba

    "Even when I'm promising mayhem and butt-chicanery, I'm generally posting with a smile on my face." - Sochin101

    "That said, if he blocked my hip on a drop nage, I would extend my leg into a drop tai Otoshi and slam him so hard his parents would die." - MTripp

  3. Red Sauce is offline
    Red Sauce's Avatar

    Awesomeweight

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    468

    Posted On:
    3/22/2007 5:50am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Just like to add, I added Full/ Front Barbell Squats to my routine as of last night (and some more back extensors) and it's filled the gap nicely, I felt doing three sets of 10-12 reps first full, then front worked nicely.

    I would like have have split them up but the gym was busy so I had to do them while I had the chance.

    I found a nice excersise to do straight after these are tricep dips off a bench, felt good for me anyway.
  4. Res Judicata is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,633

    Posted On:
    3/22/2007 9:47am


     Style: Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My two cents:

    1. Skip full back squats; squat to parallel or just below. Parallel means your femurs are parallel to the floor, not the top of your thighs! Full back squats are hell on your knees and you don't get too much additional benefit (unless you're a O-lifter).

    2. Don't front squat like the guy in the video, with the arms crossed. That's bodybuilder-style front squat. Learn to do Olympic-style front squats (elbows up, palms under).

    3. The whole "targeting" idea is a bit misguided. You can think of these kinds of lower body exercises as hip-dominant and quad-dominant. Back squats are hip-dominant, as are things like deadlifts, romanian deadlifts, glute ham raise, etc. Front squats are quad dominant, like most lunges. The lower you go below parallel in a back squat the more you use your posterior chain (lower back, glutes, hamstrings). It's usually best to do one hip-dominant and one quad dominant exercise per workout, or alternate. You don't need to do too much extra lower back work if you back squat a lot, and in fact the extra volume can be bad. Unless you're looking for hypertrophy, stick to low reps and high weights.

    4. There are advantages and disadvantages to both kinds of squats. Front squats are safer, but the loading in back squats is much higher. Learn to do them both correctly.
  5. patfromlogan is offline
    patfromlogan's Avatar

    Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hilo Island of Hawaii
    Posts
    8,871

    Posted On:
    3/22/2007 10:15am

    supporting member
     Style: Kyokushinkai / Kajukenbo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    From the turn-on-the-computer popup today, from msn's Health and Fitness

    I think that this might relate

    http://www.bestlifeonline.com/cms/pu..._printer.shtml
    http://health.msn.com/dietfitness/ar...57837&GT1=9145

    Best Life Online

    Body

    Iron Out the Kinks

    by Trevor Thieme
    Mar 2, 2007 - 9:33:53 PM

    Five common exercises you should never do

    The test of time usually works. Futile fads like sweatboxes, vibrating belts, and most tips from the odd, ponytailed Tony Little have died out quickly enough. But a few bad exercises have persisted, and exercise physiologists don’t see how these ineffective and sometimes dangerous maneuvers have survived. Take the sit-up, which can be quite damaging if done improperly. “Locking your hands behind your head can torque your cervical vertebrae,” says David Pearson, Ph.D., director of the Strength Research Laboratory at Ball State University. The result: neck pain. In fact, sit-ups are the kind of “unsafe behavior” scientists at Arkansas State University say account for 63 percent of all weight-lifting–related E.R. visits, so purge them and the rest of these body breakers from your routine.

    Posterior (Behind-the-Neck) Pull Downs This exercise rotates your shoulders into a position that strains your rotator cuffs, paving the way for inflammation. “I’ve also seen guys pull the bar down so fast that they crack their spinous processes [little nubs on top of the vertebrae],” says Pearson.
    Safe Alternative: Anterior (Front) Pull Downs Not only is pulling the bar to your chest easier on your shoulders, but “it flexes the lats through a greater range of motion, accelerating muscle growth,” says Pearson.

    Behind-the-Neck Shoulder Presses Just as posterior pull downs strain your shoulders on the way down, this exercise hurts them on the way up. Pearson says it also puts too much stress on the acromioclavicular joints (those little knobs on the tops of your shoulders), which can lead to an overuse injury commonly referred to as weight lifter’s shoulder.
    Safe Alternative: Alternating Shoulder Presses Sit on a Swiss ball and hold a pair of dumbbells overhead with your arms straight and palms facing each other. Next, bend your left elbow and lower your left arm, moving your elbow out to the side, until your upper arm is parallel with the floor. Press it back up and repeat with your right arm.

    Straight Bar Curls If you let your arms hang loosely by your sides, you’ll notice that your palms face inward. The problem with straight bar curls is that they lock your arms into an unnatural palms-up position. “In so doing, you’re stressing your elbow joints, and that can lead to tendinitis,” says Pearson.
    Safe Alternative: E-Z Bar Curls The bar is angled to put your elbows in a more natural neutral position.

    Leg Extensions The four parts of your quadriceps are designed to work together as one, but a recent study in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise found that leg extensions activate the sections slightly independently of one another. Even a five-millisecond difference can cause uneven compression between the kneecap and thighbone, inflaming the tendon that connects the kneecap to the shinbone (a painful injury known as jumper’s knee).
    Safe Alternative: Squats To squat safely, place the bar across your shoulders (not your neck) and keep your back straight, bending slightly at the hips through the squatting motion. Proper form is crucial with this exercise.

    Sit-ups Not only are sit-ups bad for your neck, but they’re also one of the least-effective abdominal exercises you can do, according to a recent study at San Diego State University.
    Safe Alternative: Bicycle Crunches That same study found the bicycle maneuver works the abs and obliques 250 percent better than traditional crunches or sit-ups. Lie on your back with your feet up in the air, then bend your knees at a 90-degree angle. With your hands behind your ears, pump your legs back and forth while moving your armpits (not your elbows) toward the opposite knees.

    © Copyright 2007 Best Life Magazine
    "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez
  6. Teh El Macho is offline
    Teh El Macho's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Porcupine/Hollywood, FL & Parmistan via Elbonia
    Posts
    11,762

    Posted On:
    3/22/2007 10:46am

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    NOTE: This does not apply to people with injured/popped knees. If you are one of them, you shouldn't be doing squats, leg extensions and curls until you are fully healed or without proper medical/PT supervision.

    I gotta disagree on the skipping full squats in favor of stopping parallel to the floor or just below. A muscle must be trained at the full range of motion in order to make the exercise fully functional. The reason most people stick to parallel is to add heavier load. That is, squats parallel to the floor are just partial reps with heavy load (which put a greater emphasis on the vastus lateralis.)

    The ability to extend the leg with force from a fully flexed knee position is important, specially since the leg is at its weakest position when it's fully flexed. Moreover, injured knees are usually the result of a muscular imbalance of the quadriceps - a weaker vastus medialis relative to a stronger vastus lateralis puts the kneecap at risk, and this imbalance develops primordially from doing partial reps (squats parallel) as opposed to a full range of motion.

    To avoid that, and to strenghten the vastus medialis, the best thing is to do single leg extensions, lunges and full squats (front or back with a light to medium load and higher reps.) Furthermore, stretching to increase the flexibility of the knee and ankle ligaments is essencial.

    Please note that if the ankles/tibialis are inflexible or weak, when a squat is performed, they will force the hips to exagerate their flexion and will diminish the knees's ability to flex (putting tremendous pressure in them.)

    If a person is having problems in his knees when going through the full range of motion, I'd see that as an indication of something to be fixed (ankles, tibialis, hips, vastus medialis). Sticking to partial reps (in this case squats parallel or just below) just perpetuates that problem. They do not solve them.

    Full range of motion needs to be exercised, with light weight or bodyweight alone if necessary. Partial reps have their place, but they must occur with exercises that work the full range of motion.

    Regarding the weighlifting style front squats, those are easier for the back. However, it is my understanding (and here I may be wrong), they do not engage the deltoids and the abdominal muscles as much as the bodybuilding style of front squats do.

    That's what I've been told, but then again, the gym is full of myths. :tongue6:
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  7. Res Judicata is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,633

    Posted On:
    3/22/2007 11:19am


     Style: Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It sounds like you've been hanging around with bodybuilders rather than athletes . . .

    Re: bodybuilder and o-lifter front squats. If you do bodybuilder style front squats you're limited by the ability of your arms to hold up the weight (basically your rhomboids and anterior deltoids). Once they fatigue, you're done (and your form goes to ****). The olympic style lets you focus on your legs -- and dump the weight easy if you have to. Plus, I do a lot of powercleans and similar variations (which every combat athlete should do!!!), so the olympic rack position is natural for me.

    I don't know that there's a difference in the isometric contraction of your abs. And I don't care. I get tons of isometric ab work from romanian deadlifts, rack pulls and the occasional good morning.

    It doesn't matter if you're squatting 200lbs to the floor or parallel. But 400 lbs is a different story. There's some evidence that full squats are bad for your knees, just keep that in mind.

    If you're worried about your VMO do some TKEs (terminal knee extensions). Actually if you're worried about your knees just read this: http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle....6-101-training (Oh and since you like the fitness chicks, check out the fitness competitor section of t-nation while you're at it. E.g. http://www.t-nation.com/figureImages.jsp?pageNo=1).

    Personally, don't back squat much at all anymore as I've gotten older. Too much risk of injury.
  8. Teh El Macho is offline
    Teh El Macho's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Porcupine/Hollywood, FL & Parmistan via Elbonia
    Posts
    11,762

    Posted On:
    3/22/2007 1:59pm

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata
    It sounds like you've been hanging around with bodybuilders rather than athletes . . .
    Snubish :tongue3: See, I always thought bodybuilders to be athletes, but in aspects different from those in olympic weightlifting or powerlifting. After all, they just don't sit on a bench waiting for the juicing to make them grow like a 'roid cactus (natural bodybuilders excluded of course). And nope, the time I lifted the most was in grad school where I hung around more with members of the track-and-field and lifting teams, not with bodybuilders.

    Incidentally, I read an article in "Planet Muscle" about some sort of new form of bodybuilding event. The focus would be not in posing (which many bodybuilders hate), but on measuring who lifts the most in a given hour. That is, given a routine of exercises/sets/reps, competitors will lift through the routine and the total # of pounds lifter would be tallied up to determine the winners. No posing, no tanning, no cutting, no microscopic male bikinis (yuk!), but athletic performance. That is, the events would be for bodybuilding enthusiasts who want to measure themselves in a true sport rather than posing in front of a bunch of idiots.

    But I digress. More to the point...

    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata
    Re: bodybuilder and o-lifter front squats. If you do bodybuilder style front squats you're limited by the ability of your arms to hold up the weight (basically your rhomboids and anterior deltoids). Once they fatigue, you're done (and your form goes to ****). The olympic style lets you focus on your legs -- and dump the weight easy if you have to.
    That's why I prefer bodybuilder type front squats. That translates better for lifting/throwing somebody... I think. I really never saw front squats as an instrument for legs alone. When my arms give up, I just put the bar back on the rack, take a 5-10 second break and resume until I get my reps, usually 15-20. For really heavy loads and low reps (4-7), I prefer to use leg presses.

    As a side note, I'm using a high number of reps since I'm doing a half-ass-tabata/semi-HIIT routine (15-20 reps followed by push ups and/or chin ups to failure, no breaks in between, all as fast as possible in good form, 1 minute break, repeat.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata
    Plus, I do a lot of powercleans and similar variations (which every combat athlete should do!!!), so the olympic rack position is natural for me.
    I like cleans and split jerks myself, but I've never quite honestly used the olympic rack position for squatting. I'll give it a try, but if it doesn't engage my arms, I'd rather stick with the bodybuilder style of front squatting. Just a personal preference.

    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata
    I don't know that there's a difference in the isometric contraction of your abs. And I don't care. I get tons of isometric ab work from romanian deadlifts, rack pulls and the occasional good morning.
    I take your word for it in the difference between olympic and bodybuilding squats when it comes to isometric ab work. Thanks. I hate good mornings, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata
    It doesn't matter if you're squatting 200lbs to the floor or parallel. But 400 lbs is a different story.
    This is something I forgot to mention, so perhaps this is where part of the disagreement comes from - full squats cannot be done with the same load as squats parallel to the floor, just like all forms of partial reps. I would never do a full squat with the same weight I use for a squat with quads parallel to the floor.

    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata
    There's some evidence that full squats are bad for your knees, just keep that in mind.
    Again, when used with the same load used for squats parallel to the floor. If that's the case, then I agree with you. The movement by itself it's not harmfull. It's the excessive weight used for it, usually mixed with weak/inflexible shins. The amount of pressure put in the knees due to weak/inflexible shins is horrendous, even when fully squatting with bodyweight alone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata
    If you're worried about your VMO do some TKEs (terminal knee extensions). Actually if you're worried about your knees just read this: http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle....6-101-training (Oh and since you like the fitness chicks, check out the fitness competitor section of t-nation while you're at it. E.g. http://www.t-nation.com/figureImages.jsp?pageNo=1)
    ****!!! The firewalls at work are blocking the t-nation website. I'm gonna have to wait until I get home to see the article... and the fitness chicks section.

    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata
    Personally, don't back squat much at all anymore as I've gotten older. Too much risk of injury.
    I'm finding myself on the same boat. I'm much weaker now that I'm reaching 38 than when I was 31. With both squats and bench presses, I estimate my strenght is 60-something % of what it was 7 years ago.

    I haven't bench pressed (flat bench) in over three months, and my shoulders are not hurting that much anymore - incline bench presses, dips and push ups for me, baby.

    As for squats, I'm doing front (bodybuilder) squats 90% of the time, three sets with moderate weight, ass to the floor for warm up (high reps quasi-HIIT), then 2 or 3 sets of front squats (sometimes back squats), quads below the horizontal, but not all the way down (sometimes with high reps, sometimes in the range of 8-12), finishing with another set of front squats, light weight, ass to the floor. Push ups and/or chin ups in between as I previously mentioned.

    I no longer try any really heavy sets of squats anymore (or flat bench presses at all). The more I keep going at it, the more that I'm leaving certain weight lifting exercises behind and including more stuff like jumping push ups, towel chin ups and burbees.
    Last edited by Teh El Macho; 3/22/2007 2:02pm at .
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  9. PirateJon is offline
    PirateJon's Avatar

    and good morning to you too

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    DC
    Posts
    3,240

    Posted On:
    4/11/2007 11:29am

    supporting member
     Style: MT/BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Goddamn great squat vid. I'm 20 minutes in so far and I'm loving it.

    http://thefitcast.com/?p=108


    via PN forums...
    You can't make people smarter. You can expose them to information, but your responsibility stops there.
  10. Bayou is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    102

    Posted On:
    5/08/2007 4:10pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Since you guys seem to be squat experts, can someone break down the benefits of single-leg squats as opposed to standard squats?
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 12 34 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.