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  1. AAAhmed46 is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/17/2007 3:07pm


     Style: karate,MMA(between gyms)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks.
  2. feedback is offline
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    UAAAH!

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    Posted On:
    3/17/2007 6:33pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thought this topic would be about something different, but in a similar vein about punching, II recently abstracted a research article.

    What was the question?
    Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), once an obscure sport known mostly in Brazil and Japan by its practitioners and aficionados, has enjoyed a recent explosion of popularity in the United States. The Modern sport of MMA is based on the ancient Greek Olympic game of Pankration, a fusion of boxing and wrestling. In MMA, competitors seek to win by either knocking out their competitors with striking techniques, or submitting them with joint-locks or chokes. MMA has differentiated itself by allowing almost all types of striking attacks, including knees and elbows, and utilizing minimal protective gear. Indeed, much of the attention garnered for the sport is owed to its outright violent qualities. The sport's violent nature, in conjunction with the well documented risks of other combat sports, such as boxing, has often caused MMA’s safety to be called into question. Buse (2006) stated that despite the “exponential growth” of MMA into the mainstream, there have been no medical publications on the results of MMA competition. The researcher’s goal was to determine the most common injuries sustained in MMA by analyzing data on match stoppages collected over a 10 year period.

    What was done?
    Buse analyzed 642 publicly available matches involving 1284 men, occurring from November 1993 to November 2003. The causes of match stoppages were divided into four main categories: head impacts, musculoskeletal stress, neck chokes, and miscellaneous trauma. The results were organized by table in accordance to frequency of occurrence.

    What was found?
    Analysis revealed that the greatest proportion of matches were stopped due to head impact (28.3%), of which the most prevalent technique was punches (16.8%). Musculoskeletal stress was the second greatest contributor to match stoppage (16.5%) with the elbow lock being the most common technique (9.3%). 14.2% of matches were ended with chokes, the two most common being rear chokes (6.5%) and front chokes (4.2%). 12.9% of the stoppages were due to miscellaneous trauma, the greatest contributors being submission due to head strikes (5.9%), periocular lacerations (3.1%) and exhaustion (2.0%). The remaining matches were stopped due to expiration of match time (27%) and disqualification (1.0%).

    What does this study mean?
    The study revealed that a greater proportion of matches were ended by head impact (28.3%) than in any other full contact combat sport. In comparison, around 8.8% of boxing matches are stopped due to head impact. In 642 matches with 1284 participants, 62 matches were stopped due to knock out, all with signs of concussion. Buse extrapolates this to 48.4 concussions per 1000 competition participants. While one concussion may not always result in serious consequences, “reported sequelae of blunt head trauma include neuropsychological decline, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, seizure disorders, intracranial haemorrhage, and death.” It was also revealed that participants who lost were significantly older than their winning counterparts, coinciding with findings of other studies linking injury proportionally to age.

    Reference
    Buse, G. J. (2006). Mixed martial arts competition: No holds barred sport fighting: a 10 year review of mixed martial arts competition. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 40;169-172.
    Last edited by feedback; 3/17/2007 6:36pm at .
    Tough is not how you act, tough is how you train.
  3. stonekoh is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/02/2007 5:41am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i think i have that problem...... all the symptoms that he mentioned.... i m thinking of blocking n parrying when i throw punches.. n my punches cant connect... how??
  4. AAAhmed46 is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/03/2007 1:37am


     Style: karate,MMA(between gyms)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I used to be like that, and to a degree i still am, from my old training mostly.

    Your never going to ''pick punches out of the air'' with your blocking. YOu have to use '

    You do muay thai right? Well i know that muay thai uses ''passive blocking'' or ''guarding'' which is personally my philosophy(though many of my fellow karateka would disagree with me)

    I think it's easier to use 'passive'' blocking because you dont have to consiously think about blocking as much as you do in a karateish/wing chunish way, and can take control again.

    But when training punches, focus on attack attack attack, and put some attention on atleast having your hands up when you punch, in the beginning atleast, thats what i did, i focussed solely on just keeping my hands up when punching, THEN i focussed on actually being able to block good.

    When drilling blocking, keep in mind, atleast in the back of your head, that your also looking for openings, thats what i do. Obviously, if your training defense you'll want to focus on how good your gaurding. But as dempsy says in that article, it must be offensive in some way.

    Just dont drop your hands when punching! :D
  5. bwdillon is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/03/2007 2:58am


     Style: Oushikoso-Jutsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Dempsy is my favourite boxer ever!
  6. M1K3 is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/03/2007 11:40am


     Style: submission grappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by AAAhmed46
    I used to be like that, and to a degree i still am, from my old training mostly.

    Your never going to ''pick punches out of the air'' with your blocking. YOu have to use '

    You do muay thai right? Well i know that muay thai uses ''passive blocking'' or ''guarding'' which is personally my philosophy(though many of my fellow karateka would disagree with me)

    I think it's easier to use 'passive'' blocking because you dont have to consiously think about blocking as much as you do in a karateish/wing chunish way, and can take control again.

    But when training punches, focus on attack attack attack, and put some attention on atleast having your hands up when you punch, in the beginning atleast, thats what i did, i focussed solely on just keeping my hands up when punching, THEN i focussed on actually being able to block good.

    When drilling blocking, keep in mind, atleast in the back of your head, that your also looking for openings, thats what i do. Obviously, if your training defense you'll want to focus on how good your gaurding. But as dempsy says in that article, it must be offensive in some way.

    Just dont drop your hands when punching! :D
    Don't just stand there. Keep your hands up, move your head, use your foot work and remember 'All boxers get hit, good boxers get hit less often'. You CAN'T block, parry or evade everything. Spar at like 50% power and get used to taking shots. Once you realise you can take a hit and keep fighting its easier to focus on your punches.

    Also when in doubt JAB. The JAB is your friend, use it often.
  7. AAAhmed46 is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/03/2007 7:22pm


     Style: karate,MMA(between gyms)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    yeah i should have mentioned that, most common mistake too.
  8. stonekoh is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/08/2007 5:32am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    oh no! i think i m suffering from all the things he mentioned?? how do i change my mentality??
  9. bwdillon is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/08/2007 8:21am


     Style: Oushikoso-Jutsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by stonekoh
    oh no! i think i m suffering from all the things he mentioned?? how do i change my mentality??
    I find a lot of people who don't have a proper trainer tend to develop this defensive style and never commit any real commbos. M1K3 is right, just get used to takeing a punch, eventualy you'll get used to it and won't be so flinchy. M1K3's also right about throwing jabs, they're your feelers so use them.
  10. AAAhmed46 is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/08/2007 4:56pm


     Style: karate,MMA(between gyms)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Dont worry about it, im sure as you practice, you'll improve.
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