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  1. metarat is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/03/2007 3:35am


     Style: Taijiquan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The majority of people from Central and South America have been exposed to Hep A, since they **** in the rivers and streams they drink from. The majority of N. Americans have not; which is why periodically lettuce picked by folks who don't wash their hands after they **** makes a lot of people sick and also creates more taco bell jokes . . .

    Hep A is a little bit worse that the average traveller's diarrhea; I as a big strong cuddly male Nurse would reccomend if you got insurance, you get vacc. for Hep A.

    Hep B is potentially fatal and will periodically flare up and damage your liver for the rest of your life if you contract it. It is spread primarily by injectables-addicts, many of whom don't admit they are such, and subsequently by bloodborne exposure-- and now, possibly, sweat.

    You do not want to know how many people incarcerated in prisons and jails are contracting Hep B, C, and drug resistant staph.

    My reccomendation is, predictably, don't worry about "cost effectiveness", the government will stay open. If your insurance covers it, strongly consider getting vaccinated for HBV.
  2. Lv1Sierpinski is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/03/2007 4:50am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Get the shots for it all. I got Hep A a while ago (most likely from something I ate) and it sucks. I couldn't eat for 3 days (dropped 11 lbs [5 kg] in those 3 days from my strapping 145 [66]), and it took 2 months for me to get my energy levels back to normal. It's the lengthy time-out that really throws you off.
  3. Shinshoryu is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/03/2007 6:13am


     Style: Aikido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by metarat
    The majority of people from Central and South America have been exposed to Hep A, since they **** in the rivers and streams they drink from. The majority of N. Americans have not...
    You know, endemic doesn't mean "the majority of people".

    Quote Originally Posted by metarat
    Hep A is a little bit worse that the average traveller's diarrhea
    :flipando:

    Quote Originally Posted by metarat
    I as a big strong cuddly male Nurse would reccomend if you got insurance, you get vacc. for Hep A.
    If quote #1 is true (particularly the 2nd half) then what's the reason for this recommendation?

    Quote Originally Posted by metarat
    Hep B is potentially fatal and will periodically flare up and damage your liver for the rest of your life if you contract it.
    :5eek:

    Quote Originally Posted by metarat
    You do not want to know how many people incarcerated in prisons and jails are contracting Hep B, C, and drug resistant staph.
    Do you know? :eusa_thin
  4. adouglasmhor is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/03/2007 6:40am


     Style: Les Mills Bodycombat™

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have been living with hepC for 16 years that i know about and could have had it for longer as there was no such thing as a reliable test for it before then. In fact when diagnosed I contacted my ex GF in Germany and told her to get tested and she told me her doctor told her there was ony hepA and HepB and no such thing as HepC. Luckily I nagged her into seeing a specialist and she was clear.

    In case anyone has any doubts -it's not fun at all.
  5. Judah Maccabee is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/03/2007 10:02am

    supporting memberhall of fameBullshido Newbie
     Style: Krav / (Kick)Boxing / BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    On an interesting, related topic, martial art schools have a legal precedent in barring students infected with AIDS from training in group lessons, as long as the school tries to make a reasonable accomodation. In the case of Michael Montalvo, the student was offered private lessons:

    http://www.sports.findlaw.com/sports...lvo/index.html

    In May of 1997, Michael Montalvo, a 12-year old boy with AIDS applied to begin taking karate classes. In the membership application Michael's father warranted that Michael was in good health and suffered from no illness or condition that would "possibly be infectious to others." The Montalvos never disclosed to U.S.A. Bushidokan or to Radcliffe that Michael had AIDS.

    On the same day Radcliffe received information from an anonymous source that Michael had AIDS, but the Montalvos denied this allegation. After receiving an affidavit from Michael's physician certifying his fitness to begin karate class Michael was allowed to participate. After the first class Radcliffe called Michael's father and asked that he have an AIDS test, at which time he finally admitted that Michael had AIDS. In response, Radcliffe met with the Montalvos and told them that Michael would not be allowed to participate in the full contact group karate classes due to the risk of infection to other participants. However, he offered to give Michael private lessons. The Montalvos declined this offer because Michael had signed up for karate lessons to participate in the same classes with his friends.

    The Montalvos instituted this lawsuit alleging that U.S.A. Bushidokan and Radcliffe had violated Michael's rights under the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Virginia Persons With Disabilities Act. The district court found that allowing Michael to participate in full contact karate classes would present a direct threat to the health and safety of instructors and other students in the class because of the risk of transmission of the HIV virus. The court concluded that forcing the class to change to a softer form of karate would be an unreasonable modification not required by the ADA and that Radcliffe's offer to provide personal training to Montalvo was a reasonable accommodation under the ADA.
  6. polishillusion is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/03/2007 12:44pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Losing Weight

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i could have sworn the shots for this are needed to go into college/ high school in most if not all states. interesting.
  7. Drunx is offline

    Featherweight

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    Posted On:
    3/03/2007 12:59pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Judo, Kungfu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by polishillusion
    i could have sworn the shots for this are needed to go into college/ high school in most if not all states. interesting.
    I know there is a requirement that students must recieve vaccination for Hepatitis B, as I have taken them myself due to school's order. I don't think there are requirements for A and C, but I can't remember what the other vaccines that I took under school order were for.
  8. metarat is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/04/2007 1:47am


     Style: Taijiquan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Shinshoryu
    Do you know? :eusa_thin
    Actually, doing aikido protects you from the Hepatitis virus. Feel free to go out and share needles with all your friends, especially those of breeding age.
  9. Shinshoryu is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/04/2007 6:35am


     Style: Aikido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by metarat
    Actually, doing aikido protects you from the Hepatitis virus. Feel free to go out and share needles with all your friends, especially those of breeding age.
    I'll take that as a no.
  10. metarat is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/04/2007 9:45am


     Style: Taijiquan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Shinshoryu
    I'll take that as a no.
    Correct. I can, however, use a search function.

    http://www.hawaii.edu/hivandaids/HIV...20(Canada).pdf

    To quote:

    Hepatitis C Seroprevalence

    Canada

    Hepatitis C (HCV) prevalence rates in prisons are
    even higher than HIV prevalence rates: studies
    undertaken in the early and mid 1990s in Canadian
    prisons revealed rates of between 28 and 40
    percent.
    Rates continue to rise. In one federal prison, 33
    percent of study participants tested positive in
    1998, compared to 27.9 percent in 1995; and at the
    Burnaby Correctional Centre for Women in British
    Columbia, over 78 percent of 69 inmates tested for
    HCV between 1 January 1996 and 8 August 1996
    were seropositive.

    Worldwide

    Similar figures are reported from other countries:
    39 percent in prisons in Victoria, Australia, and 50
    percent in New South Wales, Australia; 30 to 41
    percent among US prisoners in California,
    Connecticut, Rhode Island, Maryland, Virginia and
    Washington; and 74.8 percent among injection drug
    users in a prison for women in Vechta, Lower
    Saxony, Germany.
    Potential for further spread
    Most HCV-positive inmates come to prison already
    infected, but the potential for further spread is high:
    HCV is much more easily transmitted than HIV,
    and transmission has been documented in prisons
    in several countries, including Canada.

    ----------

    I have no personally gathered statistical basis for my pesrsonal statements, however IMO after over five years delivering healthcare in a correctional environment, I would say these figures are on or, probably, low, for correctional institutions in the U.S.

    The U.S., to my knowledge, has no comprehensive nationwide database.


    Oh yeah, you should go love some cons, too.
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