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  1. Kira_84 is offline

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    8

    Posted On:
    6/16/2007 6:48am

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Theres a newer version of repeating crossbows invented by zhuge liang at the end of the han dynasty during the 3 kingdom era roughly 400 years after sun bin. That one i think its a much better version of it.

    But 2 of the greatest ancient Chinese generals/ fighters were Guan Yu of the 3 kingdoms, and Yue Fei of the Song Dynasty. They are respected not just for their leadership as generals but also in their ability in duels.
  2. hurricane88 is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    41

    Posted On:
    6/16/2007 1:50pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Kira_84
    Theres a newer version of repeating crossbows invented by zhuge liang at the end of the han dynasty during the 3 kingdom era roughly 400 years after sun bin. That one i think its a much better version of it.

    But 2 of the greatest ancient Chinese generals/ fighters were Guan Yu of the 3 kingdoms, and Yue Fei of the Song Dynasty. They are respected not just for their leadership as generals but also in their ability in duels.
    Did you read all of Three Kingdoms to figure this out? But seriously, Guan Yu's influence history was actually quite minor, which is why Luo Guanzhong was able to immortalize him and basically do whatever he wanted to the character--he was really THAT minor in actual history. I agree with the Yue Fei, but he is not nearly as virtuous as he is shown in the novel. Zhuge Liang was given credit for inventing the popularized repeating crossbow. Whether or not it was a major improvement over the already obscurely used ones at the time I am unable to answer. Lastly, I'm not entirely sure on this, but I think that the inclusion of the duels was more of a literary inclusion rather than an actual one. In Chinese warfare, just like with any other country, the generals would NOT just waltz up for a duel. You see this all over classic literature such as the Iliad and even in Outlaws of the Marsh.
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