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  1. GoldenJonas is offline

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    3,379

    Posted On:
    3/02/2007 1:06pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    What the HELL am I drinking? PART 2

    Medical and Legal Disclaimer


    I AM NOT A MEDICAL DOCTOR, HOLISTIC DOCTOR, OR A HORTICULTURALIST. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS PROVIDED THROUGH VARIOUS SOURCES FOUND ON THE INTERNET AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED AS A DEFINITIVE OPINION AS TO THE EFFECT THAT THESE INGREDIENTS MAY HAVE ON YOUR BODY, MEDICAL OR OTHERWISE.

    THE FOLLOWING SHOULD ONLY BE USED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND AS A STARTING PLACE TO PERFORM YOUR OWN RESEARCH.

    PLEASE CONSULT WITH A QUALIFIED MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL BEFORE EMBARKING ON ANY DIETARY SUPPLEMENTATION PROGRAM.
    Inositol:
    Inositol, unofficially referred to as "vitamin B8," (though it is not considered a vitamin per se, since the human body can synthesize it) is present in all animal tissues, with the highest levels in the heart and brain. It is part of the membranes (outer coverings) of all cells, and plays a role in helping the liver process fats as well as contributing to the function of muscles and nerves. The amount of inositol in the human body is second highest of the B vitamins, surpassed only by niacin (B3).

    Studies indicate that inositol may be useful in treating mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, panic disorder, and obsessive compulsive disorder. People who are depressed may have lower than normal levels of inositol in their spinal fluid. In addition, inositol participates in the action of serotonin, a neurotransmitter known to be a factor in depression. (Neurotransmitters are chemicals that transmit messages between nerve cells.)

    Inositol is common in fibrous food and is not known to be an essential nutrient. However, nuts, seeds, beans, whole grains, cantaloupe, and citrus fruits supply a substance called phytic acid (inositol hexaphosphate, or IP6), which releases inositol when acted on by bacteria in the digestive tract. The typical American diet provides an estimated 1,000 mg daily.

    Eleutherococcus Senticosus:
    Also called Siberian Ginseng, although it is not ginseng, it stimulates the adrenal gland. It has apparently been used to treat and fight chronic fatigue syndrome and may increase endurance and stamina.

    Milk Thistle:
    Is an antioxidant and has allegedly been found effective in treatment against cancer, although very little is known about the overall effects of this plant. Milk thistle is also believed to be a good detoxifying agent.

    Citrus Aurantium:
    Citrus aurantium is a species of citrus. It is also called the bitter, sour, bigarade and Seville orange.

    Yuzu Fruit:
    The yuzu is a citrus fruit native to East Asia. It looks a bit like a small grapefruit with an uneven skin. Yuzu's flavor is tart, closely resembling that of the grapefruit, with overtones of Mandarin orange. It is rarely eaten as a fruit, though in the Japanese and Korean cuisines it is used primarily to garnish some dishes, and its juice is commonly used as a seasoning somewhat like the way a lemon is used in other cuisines.

    Folic acid:
    Folic acid is a B-complex vitamin that is important in preventing neural tube defects (NTDs) in the developing human fetus.

    Leafy greens such as spinach and turnip greens, dry beans and peas, fortified cereals and grain products, and some fruits and vegetables are rich food sources of folate.

    Glucuronolactone:
    Glucuronolactone is a naturally occurring substance manufactured by the human body. It has apparently been rumord that it was a Vietnam War era drug manufactured by the American government which resulted in several brain tumor deaths at the time. However, these rumors have not been substantiated.

    Generally, it is a metabolite that marketing stooges will tell you “promotes a sense of well-being”, whatever that means, and that it has also been shown to improve memory.

    Gotu Kola:
    Gotu Kola is a leaf that is related to parsley and carrots, found in India and Sri Lanka, among other places. It is considered by many to be a spiritually rejuvenating herb that is used for revitalizing brain and nerve cells. It has been used to treat syphilis, hepatitis, stomach ulcers, mental fatigue, epilepsy, diarrhea, fever, and asthma. Recent studies have confirmed some of the traditional uses and also suggest possible new applications for gotu kola, such as lowering high blood pressure, treating venous insufficiency, usually in the legs, boosting memory and intelligence, easing anxiety, and speeding wound healing.

    With so many life saving benefits why have we not heard of this wonder leaf sooner? One bushel of Gotu Kola please…

    Grapeseed:
    Grape seed oil is a vegetable oil pressed from the seeds of Vitis vinifera grapes, an abundant byproduct of wine making. Grape seed oil is used for: salad dressings, marinades, deep frying, flavored oils, baking, massage oil, sunburn repair lotion, hair products, body hygiene creams, lip balm and hand creams.

    In a large survey published in 1993 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Dr. Nash showed in a sample group of 56 men and women using up to 1.5 ounces (43 g) per day, an amount that one can cook with, grapeseed oil had the ability to raise HDL levels by 13% and reduce LDL levels by 7% in just three weeks. The total cholesterol/HDL ratio was reduced 15.6% and the total LDL/HDL ratio was reduced by 15.3%, which could be significant for those at risk of heart attack.

    This study would seem to go hand in hand with the research supporting the beneficial effects that wine may have on a person’s heart. Conclusion, grapes are good.

    Inosine:
    Inosine is a molecule (known as a nucleoside) that is formed when hypoxanthine is attached to a ribose ring (also known as a ribofuranose) via ab-N9-glycosidic bond. This is a very common nucleoside in tRNAs and is essential for proper translation of the genetic code in Wobble base pairs.
    …what the hell does that mean? Well, apparently the layman’s explanation is that inosine is now commonly used to treat stroke survivors and patients with multiple sclerosis due to inosine’s purported benefit to increase muscle movement. However, the final determination as to how effective inosine is in treating patients with muscular deficiencies has yet to be rendered.

    Niacin:
    Niacin, also known as nicotinic acid or vitamin B3, plays an essential role in energy metabolism. Further, niacin plays an important role in the production of several sex and stress-related hormones, particularly those made by the adrenal gland. It also plays a role in removing toxic and harmful chemicals from the body.

    A common side effect of niacin ingestion is skin flushing (the skin becomes red and the person may have a sensation of heat or “pins and needles” throughout the flushed area), even with moderate doses. The length of time in which the skin stays flushed depends on the person.

    As with any supplementation program, you should consult with a qualified physician prior to embarking on a program involving niacin supplementation.

    Pantothenic Acid:
    Pantothenic acid, also called vitamin B5, is needed to break down carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. There is anecdotal evidence as to the benefits B5 might have for healthy hair growth and it is has been shown to have positive effects for the treatment of acne.

    Riboflavin:
    Riboflavin, also known as vitamin B2, like other B vitamins it plays a key roll in energy metabolism.

    Milk, cheese, leafy green vegetables, liver and yeast are good sources of Vitamin B2, but exposure to light will destroy the Riboflavin in these natural sources. Any excess is excreted in the urine but as the human body does not store riboflavin it is thought deficiency is common. Further, riboflavin has been used in the treatment of neonatal jaundice, migraine headaches, and has recently been found to be effectively used to kill harmful pathogens in the blood.

    Vitamin B6:
    The two major forms of vitamin B6 are pyridoxine and pyridoxamine. In the liver they are converted to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) which is a cofactor in many reactions of amino acid metabolism. Simply stated, B6 helps with the release of glucose and glycogen (sugars) into the body for energy.

    The beneficial and harmful effects of B6 supplementation is a VERY slippery slope. On one hand doctors are using B6 to help in the treatment of autism and recent studies have shown that B6 supplementation MAY cut the incidences of Parkinson’s disease in half. On the other hand, as little as 500 mg of B6 per day over the course of a few months has resulted in sensory neuropathy or deadening of the cells and nerves.

    The Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine set the tolerable upper intake level for B6 at 100 mg/day for adults.

    Vitamin B12:
    Cobalamin or vitamin B12 is a chemical compound that is also known as cyanocobalamine. Generally, Vitamin B12 is necessary for the synthesis of red blood cells, the maintenance of the nervous system, and growth and development in children. B12 deficiency can result in anemia.

    What does any of this have to do with energy drinks? Your guess is as good as mine.

    Maltodextrin:
    This is a very common food additive that is derived commonly from corn starch and acts as a carbohydrate of sorts. It is an easily digestible additive to many nutritional drink and fruit juices. Basically, it is typically used as a thickening agent and also used to prolong the shelf life of the product.


    READ PART 3 HERE BITCHES!!!!!!!
    http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=52305
    Last edited by GoldenJonas; 3/29/2007 8:00pm at .

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