218300 Bullies, 9324 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 11 to 19 of 19
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. weechey is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    319

    Points
    437
    Achievements:
    Veteran5000 Experience Points

    Posted On:
    2/27/2007 9:11pm


     Style: TKD BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by RunningDog
    I had a fairly minor knee injury, and a randori session turned it into a fairly major one.
    How did that happen?
  2. RunningDog is offline
    RunningDog's Avatar

    nail conditioning

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,301

    Points
    12,518
    Achievements:
    1 year registered10000 Experience Points

    Posted On:
    2/28/2007 12:55am


     Style: Rehab

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by weechey
    How did that happen?
    I'd had physio and thought it was better, then I felt a massive shooting pain when I was doing some kind of driving movement with it, nothing spectacular. Couldn't put an ounce of weight on it for a couple of days, and now the physio doesn't know what's wrong and referred me to a knee consultant. And told me not to do contact sports.

    ****.
  3. Oscar Goldman is offline
    Oscar Goldman's Avatar

    Judo: the anti-trapple

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    251

    Posted On:
    2/28/2007 5:25am

    supporting member
     Style: Jujutsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by roly
    injuries come when the throw was 90% there and you try to escape.
    most of the time you just get thrown.
    sometimes you get away.
    very very rarely, **** happens and someone gets a trip to the hospital.
    Thats exactly what our coach said. He told us that the only serious injuries he's seen always occurred when someone was screwed by their opponent's kuzushi but decided to try to counter anyway instead of taking the throw. I was also reading that almost all injuries in high level judo happen due to people trying to turn-out in the air or post a hand instead of using ukemi (to avoid ippon).

    I've met quite a few judoka who "retired" to BJJ, claiming it was easier on their bodies, but that's just anecdotal and I don't have enough experience to verify if that is true.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dinosaur AMP
    You just can't go wrong when your getting armbar'd to Flogging Molly while a fire fighter is cursing at you in the background. Good stuff!
  4. knuckle dragger is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    64

    Posted On:
    2/28/2007 6:27am


     Style: BJJ and Westernized TKD.

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Lu Tze
    Judo can be pretty hard on the knees, I think quite a lot of the injuries sustained in judo are knee related.

    This is of course my none medical opinion, and it really depends how bad your knee is but if you're in any doubts then I wouldn't do it.

    Don't do it. I dislocated my knee in Judo. I have also seen other people do the same. If you talk to any old Judo guy they will tell you about their injuries. Every school has the old Judo blackbelt that does not Randori anymore due to injuries.
    Maybe Japanese are not as easily injured doing Judo due to their compact body types but for us big westerners it is hard on the body.

    If you are wanting to work on your takedowns Wresteling is better. Judo requires your opponent be wearing something you can grab on to. Plus, most people will jack your jaw if you walk up and start grabbing on them.
  5. weechey is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    319

    Points
    437
    Achievements:
    Veteran5000 Experience Points

    Posted On:
    2/28/2007 10:31am


     Style: TKD BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks guys, you've given me a lot to think about - I just found out that I got into the graduate program out in Cali, so if I head out there, I am def gonna continue my BJJ, but maybe I'll test the waters a little w Judo and/or Wrestling just to see what it's like.

    I'm not old but at my age the aches last just a bit longer than they used to :-D
  6. Jaxon is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    13

    Posted On:
    2/28/2007 1:37pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'll second the others and say you need to conscientiously use your ukemi. Even though it's tempting to try to twist out of a throw that 90% there, the injuries you can get from landing badly are not worth it. Try especially to avoid landing on your knees; they aren't meant to take that kind of punishment.
  7. Dutch_Law is offline

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    2

    Posted On:
    2/28/2007 11:52pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I wouldn't recommend it (hitting Judo), especially if you've got the opportunity to do (regular and decent) BJJ and, more importantly, really enjoy your BJJ. By and large, Judo training is way harder on the body than BJJ and the knees tend bear the brunt of both your and your partner's training mistakes. I dare say that anybody who has gone through knee ligament tears and reconstructions (as I have) would suggest that the associated risks may just not be worth it.
  8. NorthWest is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    281

    Points
    4,500
    Achievements:
    Veteran1000 Experience Points

    Posted On:
    3/01/2007 5:16am


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Is Judo really that rough? Reading this thread, I'm almost convinced that it's just a matter of time before I blow one or both of my knees.
    It's a contact sport, so by it's very nature its more injurious than freestyle krotty.

    Whether you practice Judo or BJJ, accidents will happen and you will get hurt. Your injuries will in all likelihood be non serious, but the possibility of serious injury is always there. You can help prevent serious injury by playing smart:
    Practice your breakfalls. A lot.
    Fall properly when thrown, don't resist it or try to twist out.
    Good technique is next to godliness.
    Tap early and often.
    Manage your injuries properly. Do what the Doc says. Stay off the mat if necessary.

    There's got to be some studies somewhere on comparitive serious injury rates of different sports.
    Must try to find it.
  9. Red Sauce is offline
    Red Sauce's Avatar

    Awesomeweight

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    468

    Points
    1,249
    Achievements:
    Veteran5000 Experience Points

    Posted On:
    3/01/2007 5:37am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by weechey
    How is it hard on the knees? I've seen a few throws where you drop down on your knees - is that where the injuries tend to come from? Plus, are the injuries the type that you get mostly when you are starting out, with the expectation that as you become more experienced there is less risk of getting your knee caught?

    Thanks!

    The way these throws really should be taught/done is by going in with a bent knee with your leading foot, and coming around/down into a squat postion where you can both pull on the grip (whatever it is, shoulder for example) on the opponant forcing him down and pushing off your support foot forwards, rocking onto shins/knees.

    *However* as this takes quite alot of finesse and patience/practice, alot of people just tend to flop straight to their knees with these forward throws, often landing on the point of the joint and they wonder why their knees are screwed.

    I would love to say to the thread starter to jump in head first w/ judo, but chances realistically are that you will do more damage to your knees in the long run.

    But if you could avoid these throws (or learn them properly) then you will be okay really, Im just a bit moody because my shins are black and blue at the moment and It's hurting me to train.
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.