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  1. #1
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Short-lived aikido experience- views please!

    Started Aikido in a local sports center about five weeks ago. Seemed okay but very confusing. Teacher (3rd Dan ) wore a skirt thing but everyone else wore white judogis and white belts, so it was hard to know who was experienced and who wasn't.

    As a newbie I got given about 10min instruction/practice at the start of each session on breakfalls/rolls.

    After that I would muck in with all the others. The format was that the teacher would demonstrate a technigue several times, without much explanation, and then people would pair off to practice it. The teacher would circulate around and correct things if they looked wrong or if people were confused.

    On the third class (two weeks ago), I was with a bloke practicing some technique involving being put into a fancy wristlock and then having to do a forward roll. At one point I was confused about what to do, so the bloke says "do a forward roll". I didn't feel correctly setup for the roll, the wrong leg was forward, but I did one anyway.

    I landed heavily on top of my shoulder and ended up with an acromio-clavicular joint separation. It was very sore for a week but is slowly improving now. The physio says I will have to avoid stressing my shoulder for another 3 to 4 weeks. The extra bump I now have on top of my shoulder is, apparently, for life

    Turns out the dojo floor is concrete under fairly thin mats!

    The irony is that I had also recently started judo, and was pretty sure that that would be where I would be most likely to get injured.

    Is this just very bad luck, or have I chosen an aikido setup that is not ideal? I'd appreciate the views of those who have a fair bit of aikido experience. I need to decide if I'm going to go back or not when my shoulder is fixed.


    Escapist

  2. #2
    I am a Ninja bitches!! Deal with it Join us... or die
    Goju - Joe's Avatar
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    Nov 2005
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sounds like shitty teaching

  3. #3
    Fearless Ukemi's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Anyone worthy to teach would have noticed you had the wrong foot forward before telling you to roll. If he was not an instructor, he should have called an instructor over and kept his mouth shut. Sounds like bad luck to me.

  4. #4
    Community Corrections Officer supporting member
    Matt W.'s Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    When I recently trained Judo, after not doing any serious grappling for a couple years, I was incredibly, incredibly sore. I came home bruised every night. Once, I got my ankle caught as a guy threw me and hyperextended it until I heard a load pop. Limped for a couple days and it still isn't 100%. These kind of minor pains and injuries (they don't always feel minor, mind you, but in the grand scheme of things they are) are part of good hardcore training.

    I can't comment on whether or not you are receiving bad instruction. Maybe you are. But the first thing that went through my head when I read your post was, "Everybody falls wrong sometimes. Mistakes happen. So, stop being a *****." *shrug* No offense, but maybe you need to hear that side of things too. Who knows?

  5. #5
    sochin101's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Escapist
    Is this just very bad luck, or have I chosen an aikido setup that is not ideal? I'd appreciate the views of those who have a fair bit of aikido experience. I need to decide if I'm going to go back or not when my shoulder is fixed.
    looks like you found the real deadly Aikido...:evil6:

    I didn't feel correctly setup for the roll, the wrong leg was forward, but I did one anyway.
    I have practically zero aikido knowledge, but I don't think you should have "rolled" if you weren't sure.
    I know it's tough being new, and not wanting to look stupid, but there's no shame at all in just saying like "stop the bus dude, I'm not sure. Can we do it again/more slowly" and if you still aren't sure, a senior student should call over the instructor to help you out.

    I don't think you should worry about whether to go back... go back and trust your instincts when you're not sure.

    Good luck, heal fast.

    The extra bump I now have on top of my shoulder is, apparently, for life
    I have one on my left shoulder: racing bike, over handlebars, smashed skull or dislocated shoulder? I love my little extra bump!
    Where there is only a choice between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence.

    Gandhi


  6. #6

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    152
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hang on.... they had you grab someones wrist then told you to do a forward roll?

    Thats the REAL aikido alright!

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    150
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Escapist
    Started Aikido in a local sports center about five weeks ago. Seemed okay but very confusing. Teacher (3rd Dan ) wore a skirt thing but everyone else wore white judogis and white belts, so it was hard to know who was experienced and who wasn't.

    As a newbie I got given about 10min instruction/practice at the start of each session on breakfalls/rolls.

    After that I would muck in with all the others. The format was that the teacher would demonstrate a technigue several times, without much explanation, and then people would pair off to practice it. The teacher would circulate around and correct things if they looked wrong or if people were confused.

    On the third class (two weeks ago), I was with a bloke practicing some technique involving being put into a fancy wristlock and then having to do a forward roll. At one point I was confused about what to do, so the bloke says "do a forward roll". I didn't feel correctly setup for the roll, the wrong leg was forward, but I did one anyway.

    I landed heavily on top of my shoulder and ended up with an acromio-clavicular joint separation. It was very sore for a week but is slowly improving now. The physio says I will have to avoid stressing my shoulder for another 3 to 4 weeks. The extra bump I now have on top of my shoulder is, apparently, for life

    Turns out the dojo floor is concrete under fairly thin mats!

    The irony is that I had also recently started judo, and was pretty sure that that would be where I would be most likely to get injured.

    Is this just very bad luck, or have I chosen an aikido setup that is not ideal? I'd appreciate the views of those who have a fair bit of aikido experience. I need to decide if I'm going to go back or not when my shoulder is fixed.


    Escapist
    Sounds like a bad teacher or partner, if you weren't ready to roll, then you weren't ready. It normally takes some people quite sometime to roll correctly without injuring themselves. Start rolls from kneeling, then standing, then with "FULL FORCE" lol. When I first started rolls though I'd land right on my back and get the wind knocked out of me, but as time went on I just kept practicing and currently now my Aikido Ukemi works and transfers very well into my current Judo environment.

    Matter of fact, just do Judo, save yourself....If you think wrist grabs are odd, you haven't even seen the LARPing with the Ken, Jo, and Magic Pants!!!

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    Victoria
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    it takes some people longer than other to learn to forward roll, i know as I was one of them! People are welcome to laugh at that as I am fully aware that most find it stupidly easy. I find it hard to imagine what exactly was going on there, the only time I can recall being told to 'forward roll' out of any kind of wristlock was when I was being shown the very basic elements of how a person might kick their rear leg around and turn into the throw for stylisted and basic 'tobi ukemi' which I don't think is uaually taught in any third class. Whats wrong with a basic 'sit fall' type breakfall in this situation I do not know. Odd.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    274
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It is very difficult to find a good Aikido school that will not teach Aikido as if it where some kind of spiritual/majical thing. It's all about angles and beating the **** out of your opponent with everything in sight. But like I said it's hard to find an Aikido place tuhat will teach it like that.

  10. #10
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for the replies. It's helpful to have some other viewpoints.

    I guess I need to really work at the breakfalls and rolls as a priority once I'm back to fitness.

    The aikido class I 'm referring to doesn't seem particularly spiritual, but is practical in nature, and is convenient to where I live.

    I not too bothered about "Ki" or the weapons training - I thought the aikido throws and locks would complement the judo I had also started

    I did try BJJ a few years ago, at one of the UK Gracie Barra clubs - and ended up with a broken rib after a few lessons - got crunched when trying to escape guard from a visiting blue blelt.

    I realise knocks and sprains are part of MA but newbies ought to be allowed to walk before they are expected to run.

    Perhaps I need to stick with ninja knitting or pressue-point stamp-collecting. LOL.

    Escapist

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