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  1. Scott Larson is offline
    Scott Larson's Avatar

    Gold Summit Martial Arts Institute

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    Dec 2006
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    Buffalo, NY
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    1,807

    Posted On:
    3/31/2007 8:50am


     Style: Ba Zheng Dao Quan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It appears I must be a supporting member to PM. I'm in Buffalo, so I'll have to plan a day trip anyway, but I'll defiinately get back to you when I have a free day. Thanks.
  2. Alex8876 is offline

    Registered Member

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    Jun 2006
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    Posted On:
    4/04/2007 7:29pm


     Style: Wing Chun Gung Fu/JKD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Repulsive Monkey
    We've covered this to an extent in past, but I would like to make a dedicated CMA version. So here we go:
    What are the specific principles of your style?

    Simplicity, Directness, and Economy of Motion/Energy.

    The Centerline theory, which states that the central line of your body contains all your vital points. it is what you must defend and where your attacks start.

    it is Ideal to Parry/Deflect your opponent's force/energy/momentum than to stop or block it because you will be using your enemy's force against him, whereas blocking is just force against force.

    What abilities does your style claim to impart?

    Lightning reflexes due to training to fight using tactile sensitivity

    The ability to totally destroy your opponent in a short amount of time by striking either one, or several vital points on their body multiple times.

    What is the average timeline for the development of those abilities?

    5-7 years depending on the practitioners ability to absorb information and train the methods.

    The nerve! On what basis are you cheeky enough to be claim enough expertise to speak for your style?

    I've only been training for about 1 or 2 years, yet if someone tries to strong arm me on the street i will punch their head until their brain is bouncing around in their skull like Muhammad Ali's Speed bag.
  3. hoshowsky is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/08/2007 5:15pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: tai chi ch'uan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Mr Repulsive Monkey,

    I am a beginner at tai chi, taoist style, and I have been told by me teacher that engaging in anything hard (weightlifting, karate) would inhibit the learnig process. He said if I had to do anything it should be something similar, like AIkido. What are your thoughts, if you would?

    John Hoshowsky
  4. SifuJason is offline

    Senior Member

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    Jan 2007
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    NC
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    Posted On:
    4/08/2007 5:40pm


     Style: WHKD (Kaju), Sub. Grapple

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by hoshowsky
    Mr Repulsive Monkey,

    I am a beginner at tai chi, taoist style, and I have been told by me teacher that engaging in anything hard (weightlifting, karate) would inhibit the learnig process. He said if I had to do anything it should be something similar, like AIkido. What are your thoughts, if you would?

    John Hoshowsky
    I think it depends on what you and he define as the learning process. If your goal is overall martial arts proficiency, I think cross training in general is beneficial. If, however, you are focusing on the internal arts, then I can see your Sifu's point, and it may be best to hold off at this point. This is because falling into an "internal mode" tends to be a difficult process in the beginning for a lot of people, and training in hard style arts simultaneously could make it harder.
  5. meataxe is offline
    meataxe's Avatar

    International Man of Pancakes

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    Jun 2005
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    Toronto
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    1,714

    Posted On:
    4/08/2007 10:39pm


     Style: Wu style tcc+bjj

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Is it this version of Taoist Tai Chi? http://taoist.org/english/index.php

    I think they do not teach anything martial, no?

    I think it really depends on what you want to achieve. If you are interested in martial arts, then choose the style that you think suits you best. You should be able to find some pointers on this site. The tai chi you practice might end up as a good relaxing exercise to augment your training.

    BTW, I was just looking at the website now. As long as I remember, the Taoists have used "tai chi" (as in the philosophical concept) and not "tai chi chuan" (the "chuan" can be translated as "Boxing"). However, the Chinese on the site *does* have the "chuan".
    Anyone who has the power to make you believe absurdities has the power to make you commit injustices.
    - Voltaire
  6. dwhomp is offline

    Registered Member

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    Jan 2007
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    Posted On:
    4/09/2007 2:29am


     Style: Xing-Yi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by hoshowsky
    Mr Repulsive Monkey,

    I am a beginner at tai chi, taoist style, and I have been told by me teacher that engaging in anything hard (weightlifting, karate) would inhibit the learnig process. He said if I had to do anything it should be something similar, like AIkido. What are your thoughts, if you would?

    John Hoshowsky
    I have heard this before about Tai Chi, but I will never be convinced that getting yourself in shape wont help you.
  7. Bang! is offline
    Bang!'s Avatar

    Light Heavyweight

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    Apr 2003
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    3,242

    Posted On:
    4/09/2007 6:50am

    supporting memberBullshido Newbie
     Style: Wu Style TCC + BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well, what do we know about the way the body works? Does learning a specific type of motor unit pattern negatively affect learning another type? Not to my knowledge -- at least for dissimilar patterns. However, there is another type of nervous system training that takes place with tai chi; namely the development of awareness . Your muscles, tendons, senses etc. all work to deliver information on where your body is in space and what it feels like. Using these tools to be as relaxed as possible is essential to your practice.

    While I don't advocate living a sheltered life (particularly one free of yucky physical exertion), I do think that there is one issue to consider: practicing things that leave residual muscular tension are problematic in the early stages. They're going to inhibit you from developing a sense of just how relaxed you actually can be.

    This process takes at least a few months (and often much longer) to reach a high point. It also pretty much has to be integrated into everything you do. Once that high point has been reached, I think that you can begin to get into other activities, so long as you retain the ability to bring your muscles back into a relaxed state equal or better to the level previously attained.

    Okeedoke?
    Last edited by Bang!; 4/09/2007 3:43pm at .
  8. Hungsing is offline

    Featherweight

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    Posted On:
    4/27/2007 8:54am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Choy Lee Fut Kung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Choy Lee Fut (or Choy Lay Fut or Choy Lay Fat, it all sounds the same) is a relatively young (for chinese standards, I'd say) style being only a hundred and fifty something years old. I practice the Hung Sing branch from Cheung Yim (a.k.a. Cheung Hung Sing), in some stories the co-founder of the style, in some others just a student of the founder, it depends on which branch you ask.

    I was never taught specific principles but the forms show you that the main principle is "hit your opponent once, if he's not down yet keep on hitting him". It's quite dynamic, more fluid than Hung Gar and the other southern families.

    Choy Lee Fut was designed to train people in short time. So the forms are a bit hard for a beginner, not the moves themselves, but the rythm and the "going down then going up again" which strengthens your legs. In my school we begin training with two more basic forms (Lim Po Kuen and Dun Da from Ku Yu Cheung's Bak Siu Lum) and then we go fully into the proper style. Also, the style has only ten bare hand forms and a few specific weapons so you can learn it all in less than a lifetime.
    If you really train hard, I'd say in a couple of years you can really be good. The techniques are quite easy and most of them very effective. Lots of circular punches (with a downward angle so as to use gravity as help) and the leopard fist which targets the soft parts of the body using the middle knuckles.

    I've been training for almost eight years now, but with college and stuff I really train hard in the summer or when I don't have classes.
  9. T/C Danny is offline

    Featherweight

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    Apr 2007
    Location
    Brackley, Northants, Eng
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    17

    Posted On:
    5/01/2007 8:36pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Tiger/Crane Combination

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    'What are the specific principles of your style?'

    Relaxed power, touch sensitivity, awareness, sinking the weight into each strike, building determination and resolve, gaining a healthy sense of self confidence.


    'What abilities does your style claim to impart?'

    The ability to hit very hard and hurt people and having the confidence to do this if there is no other course of action.

    'What is the average timeline for the development of those abilities?'

    The development never stops. You should be able to use what you've learnt straight away to some extent but the learning never stops. My teachers been training in the same art for 25 years and he's still learning from his master. I don't think any decent art is ever more than a work in progress, its only in crap schools that 7th Dans attain perfection(?).
  10. eyebeams is offline

    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    5/18/2007 12:06am


     Style: Kickboxing/Grappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Okay, Mizong Luohan (My Jhong Law Horn)

    Principles:

    1) Use the "short" power principles of IMA in a "long," Shaolin-style frame. The sum of joint forces moving from the legs, hips, waist to maximum extension, while loading pressure on the structure of the joints.

    2) Strike in combinations without being entangled in the opponent's guard. Maintain the offense. We do some sticking and pushing, but almost always for the purpose of getting the opponents guard out of the way.

    3) Use deceptive and varied footwork to rapidly change level and distance while maintaining pressure. We move from short to big movements and change direction and level often.

    Abilities:

    1) Hitting hard and fast from any standup distance instead of of an ideal kickboxing distance. I'd say the base is a lot like snappy kickboxing with a bunch of tricks.

    2) Avoiding and overcoming the opponent's defense.

    3) Practical (knife and stick) and traditional (18 weapons) weapons skills.

    Time

    It really depends on your commitment level. Our school leaves it to the student to decide progression speed. The teacher has an idea of what complete knowledge at a certain level is, though, so you won't be exposed to some material without sparring, for instance. One of my seniors did okay at Sanda when he went to China after about 4 years of casual training, but one person who's been around longer is really not interested in application.

    I should also note that my school also covers Yang Ta Chi and Xingyi as well. The Tai Chi is separate but seriously influences the kung fu, while the Xingyi is taught with the Mizong.
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