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  1. Tonuzaba is online now
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    C.E. B.S.net Ambassador

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    Posted On:
    7/10/2009 7:32am

    supporting member
     Style: (Beautiful) Spring Roll

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Monkfg View Post
    ...Hey, thanks for the tip. Where do I get info about this?...
    Here you go:
    http://www.bullshido.net/forums/show...light=european

    CLICK & WATCH
    :
    I got BULLSHIDO ON TV!!!

    "Bruce Lee sucks because I slammed my nuts with nunchucks trying to do that stupid **** back in the day. I still managed to have two kids. I forgive you Bruce.
    " - by Vorpal
  2. smartangel is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/05/2009 8:12pm


     Style: wingchunkickboxingfencing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    my style of taichi its a fusion of xing gi and baguazhang and wu style taichi made by sun lang tang . its foot work is unique and use many scrouch position . It contain many short hand movement . Its easy to learn and relaxing and it be use in combat.
  3. metarat is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/06/2009 1:56pm


     Style: Taijiquan

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well, if the Founder of your Style is in fact, Sun LuTang, then are we correct in assuming that you are talking about Sun style Taiji? You don't specify . . .
  4. nt1314 is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/12/2009 5:46am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Choy Lay Fut

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Choy Lay Fut - Hung Sing Koon

    its main principle is the coordinated movement of the body (more specifically foot, hip, hand) to increase the power and speed of the strike, otherwise known as 'natural power.' Actually most if not all other styles of fighting like boxing etc.. put at least some emphasis on body coordination to increase power, so its not too different in that respect. Although easy in theory, it's quite difficult to develop in practice.

    alot of clf focuses on long-arm "outdoor" techniques, although we do have a couple of forms that focus on short-arm/"indoor" fighting. Theres quite alot of principles and technques i can't think of it off the top of my head to write down here, especially cos its 4:45am and I'm sleepy as hell. More on this next time...
  5. Mosfett is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/18/2009 9:57am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Baguazhang

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bang! View Post
    We've covered this to an extent in past, but I would like to make a dedicated CMA version. So here we go:

    What are the specific principles of your style?

    What abilities does your style claim to impart?

    What is the average timeline for the development of those abilities?

    The nerve! On what basis are you cheeky enough to be claim enough expertise to speak for your style?

    Thanks!
    I do Yin Style Bagua.

    The principles are numerous, but our foundation is built upon 8 different animals - Lion is the 'signature' - that correspond with the 8 trigrams (ba gua) of the I Ching.

    From the Smokey Mtn YSB page:
    "This style has been described as a “guerilla warfare” method of fighting in comparison to the straight line methodology commonly employed by other arts. Baguzhang uses advanced stepping techniques and strategies to attack the opponent at their weakest points. Rarely attacking “head on,” it works by using evasive footwork that puts an opponent in a state of confusion and vulnerability. All areas of the body are trained to be utilized as weapons. Basic training consist of turning the circle, an exercise to develop leg strength and quick, sure-footed movement; static postures are held to develop strength; numerous striking drills are practiced in high repetition to build power and proper form; and forms are taught to help ingrain a multitude of applications."
    As far as timeline - like other martial arts, there is not a pill you can take, or a special DVD you can order that will make you proficient in this overnight. It's hard work. Progress depends on correct teaching, correct practice, dedication and willingness.

    As far as my qualification to speak for my style; My instructor spent several years with He Jinbao. Also, there are only a handful of us practicing this style globally (many more people practice Cheng or a subset like Gao), and the few of us that there are feel a sense of responsibility for preserving and proliferating the style.
  6. fireport is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/27/2010 12:27am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Nan Quan

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Since there are so many pages I'll just intro myself and read it later
    I've studied 7 years of Nan Quan and a bit of Chang Quan.
    I chose CMA because I am chinese and I wanted to learn more about the philosophy of my culture and fulfill the stereotype that chinese people can all do kungfu!

    In my experience I've only lost 7 matches out of 87 matches. Of that 7, 2 were TKD,1 was a street brawler, 1 BJJ and the remaining 3 are my own seniors and also my master.

    I have beaten many different martial artists in my short stint of the underground circuit where I live. MT and Savate were a few of the most challenging I've ever fought. BJJ and Jujitsu were the most interesting despite the fact that BJJ isn't very good here and most of them can't take a chop to the cranium.

    Well thats about it :)
  7. Relytive is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/29/2012 12:45am


     Style: Water Polo/ Backpacking

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Anybody train in Vovinam, I did for about half a year. It's kinda like Viet Taekwondo, but on steroids with cooler, more practical forms.
  8. DivisionByZero is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/01/2012 10:48pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Ngo Cho Kun

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This previous post was like... serious thread necromancy.

    Oh well.

    I am learning Ngo Cho Kun or 5 Ancestors Fist. but I'm a serious n00b, only practicing for about 4 months.

    "What are the specific principles of your style?"

    It's a Southern Shaolin system that was invented as a blend of 5 other styles: Luo Han, Tai Cho (long fist), Da Mo (iron body/breathing), Monkey, and Fukien white crane. It seems mostly focused on short-range, hand techniques. Rooted stance is very important as are the arm conditioning exercises. The rest is too subtle for me to understand right now.

    "What abilities does your style claim to impart?"

    I'm not sure what this means. Certainly the arm conditioning teaches one to block or be blocked without buckling under the shock. I haven't noticed any spider sense as yet.

    My sifu is about 62 and in very good shape. Actually, pretty amazing shape. If I can be in as good shape as he is when I'm 62, that's special ability enough for me.

    "What is the average timeline for the development of those abilities?"

    It's a lifetime sort of thing... Advancement totally depends on what the student puts into it as well.

    "The nerve! On what basis are you cheeky enough to be claim enough expertise to speak for your style?"

    Yeah, I'm a total n00b so don't listen to me.
  9. Anjin is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/04/2012 11:24am


     Style: Xingyi

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm currently actively studying xingyi and baji. The xingyi i'm being taught is sun style. I like it quite a bit for the relaxed mechanics and hand/foot coordination. My sifu is forcing me to slow down a lot and focus on body connections at the moment, which I honestly need someone to do since my power expression has become perhaps too rigid. Baji I learned from my uncle when I was younger, the Xiaojia and most of the basic strikes, as well as power generation methods. I like Baji best, but I'm between real instructors right now. Might go to Beijing to learn in december.

    CMA and the IMA are great because the training just feels right. It's often painful, but at the end of the day you just feel very good after a practice even if it was a long or tough session. I've done boxing and muay thai as well, and respect those a lot for their practicality, toughness, and effective ability to build fighters quickly. However I think the CMA are just satisfying in a different way.
  10. slamdunc is online now
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    Extraordinarily Ordinary

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    Posted On:
    5/04/2012 4:30pm

    supporting member
     Style: TKD, CMA & American Kenpo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What are the specific principles of your style?
    It incorporates both internal and external methods, (soft) small circular blocks & parries, and (hard) short linear strikes & kicks. Footwork, stance and posture are the more technical aspects. Extreme physical conditioning and controlled breathing translate into powerful, fluid transmission of energy.

    What abilities does your style claim to impart?
    The ability to judge places and situations you shouldn’t put yourself in. The ability to adapt to environmental aspects of a bad situation and turn them to your advantage. The ability to physically defend yourself; to dominate and devastate your enemy if necessary.

    What is the average timeline for the development of those abilities?
    This is the hardest thing to gauge and varies greatly depending on: Physical condition, natural athletic ability, flexibility, balance & equilibrium, commitment to training, determination, and motivation.
    An average student (if there is such a thing) training four to eight hours per week can become proficient in the self-defense phase within about twelve to eighteen months. This time greatly decreases if the practitioner cross-trains in other defensive arts such as Judo, BJJ, boxing, or wrestling.
    The nerve! On what basis are you cheeky enough to be claim enough expertise to speak for your style? Having trained in the same system for the last twenty-nine years (with a few short breaks) is probably the most logical reason. Training in several other systems, some mirroring this style and some totally contradicting it, rounds me out a bit. Teaching martial arts was my only job for about five years; I keep an open mind (except for Ninjas, chi-balls) and continue to learn every day. FOOM!!
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