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  1. kracker is offline

    Registered Member

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    Posted On:
    1/23/2007 4:35pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    broken neck in wrestling

    I've been wrestling a while now in addition to BJJ and quite frankly I admit it, it scares the hell out of me every time I get slammed. How common are broken necks in wrestling (Highschool style). I have no neck problems and can bridge on my forehead absolutely fine and everything but after seeing a couple paralyzed people at the hospital I do my community service at (not from wrestling, mostly car accidents) it is scaring the hell out of me that I may end up like that and wrestling consequently stopped being fun and I got way worse because now I play everything way to cautious. I am just curious if anyone has solid statistics about how likely it is for guys getting their neck snapped in wrestling accidents.
    Last edited by kracker; 1/23/2007 4:41pm at .
  2. Tom Kagan is offline
    Tom Kagan's Avatar

    Dark Overlord of the Bullshido Underworld

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    Posted On:
    1/23/2007 5:03pm

    supporting member
     Style: Taai Si Ji Kung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Injuries in Collegiate Wrestling
    Glenn J. Jarrett, MD*, John F. Orwin, MD*,***, and Randall W. Dick, MS**

    * Division of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin,

    **National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, Overland Park, Kansas

    *** Address correspondence and reprint requests to John F. Orwin, MD, Division of Orthopedic Surgery, 600 Highland Avenue, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI 53792-7375
    We evaluated the data of the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System on collegiate wrestling with a focus on musculoskeletal injuries. Over 800,000 athlete-exposures during an 11-year period compose these data. Findings particular to wrestling and a comparison with other collegiate sports are included. Collegiate wrestling had a relatively high rate of injury at 9.6 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures. It was second to spring football in total injury rate. Most injuries in this study were not serious, with 6.3% resulting in surgery and 37.6% resulting in a week or more off from wrestling. There was only one catastrophic, nonfatal injury. The knee, shoulder, and ankle were the most commonly injured regions, and injuries to them were often the more serious. Sprains, strains, and contusions were the most common injury types. Takedowns and sparring were the most common activities at the time of injury. Mechanism of injury was evaluated; rotation about a planted foot and contact with environmental objects were identified as areas needing further attention. Illegal action accounted for only 4.6% of injuries in competition. Competition had a significantly higher injury rate than practice, but the injury profiles of these two areas showed both to be equally important. The preseason and regular season had higher injury rates than the postseason, but, again, the injury profiles of these periods were similar. Injury percentages were similar among the 10 weight classes.
    Calm down, it's only ones and zeros.

    "Your calm and professional manner of response is really draining all the fun out of this. Can you reply more like Dr. Fagbot or something? Call me some names, mention some sand in my vagina or something of the sort. You can't expect me to come up with reasonable arguments man!" -- MaverickZ

    "Tom Kagan spins in his grave and the fucking guy isn't even dead yet." -- Snake Plissken

    My Bullshido fan club threads:
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  3. thomaspaine is offline

    Registered Member

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    Posted On:
    1/23/2007 5:07pm


     Style: No-Gi BJJ, Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by kracker
    I've been wrestling a while now in addition to BJJ and quite frankly I admit it, it scares the hell out of me every time I get slammed. How common are broken necks in wrestling (Highschool style). I have no neck problems and can bridge on my forehead absolutely fine and everything but after seeing a couple paralyzed people at the hospital I do my community service at (not from wrestling, mostly car accidents) it is scaring the hell out of me that I may end up like that and wrestling consequently stopped being fun and I got way worse because now I play everything way to cautious. I am just curious if anyone has solid statistics about how likely it is for guys getting their neck snapped in wrestling accidents.
    Arn't slams illegal in HS wrestling? I always thought it had to be a "controlled fall". Slams are illegal in most BJJ tournaments too.
  4. kracker is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/23/2007 5:41pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kagan
    Injuries in Collegiate Wrestling

    Glenn J. Jarrett, MD*, John F. Orwin, MD*,***, and Randall W. Dick, MS**

    * Division of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin,


    **National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, Overland Park, Kansas

    *** Address correspondence and reprint requests to John F. Orwin, MD, Division of Orthopedic Surgery, 600 Highland Avenue, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI 53792-7375
    We evaluated the data of the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System on collegiate wrestling with a focus on musculoskeletal injuries. Over 800,000 athlete-exposures during an 11-year period compose these data. Findings particular to wrestling and a comparison with other collegiate sports are included. Collegiate wrestling had a relatively high rate of injury at 9.6 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures. It was second to spring football in total injury rate. Most injuries in this study were not serious, with 6.3% resulting in surgery and 37.6% resulting in a week or more off from wrestling. There was only one catastrophic, nonfatal injury. The knee, shoulder, and ankle were the most commonly injured regions, and injuries to them were often the more serious. Sprains, strains, and contusions were the most common injury types. Takedowns and sparring were the most common activities at the time of injury. Mechanism of injury was evaluated; rotation about a planted foot and contact with environmental objects were identified as areas needing further attention. Illegal action accounted for only 4.6% of injuries in competition. Competition had a significantly higher injury rate than practice, but the injury profiles of these two areas showed both to be equally important. The preseason and regular season had higher injury rates than the postseason, but, again, the injury profiles of these periods were similar. Injury percentages were similar among the 10 weight classes.
    Only ONE catastrophic injury in 800000 wrestlers wow, I guess I can feel confident taking my chances on the mat now eh, thanks. That seems almost impossible but great thanks.
  5. phuquedup is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/23/2007 5:51pm


     Style: PT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Being slammed, stacked, thrown and cranked isnt good for anyones neck, but if you don't have prior injuries you can most likely handle it. just exercise your best judgment in choosing your partners and in tapping.
  6. Yock is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/23/2007 9:44pm


     Style: Wrestling, Sub Grappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    For High School Wrestling in Maryland, I can only think of two in the last twenty years. One in the eighties resulting in paralysis, and one last year resulting in death.
  7. Wolf is offline
    Wolf's Avatar

    T3h R34l Gangnam Style!

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    Posted On:
    1/23/2007 11:45pm

    staff
     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Probably permanently crippling.
  8. Judah Maccabee is offline
    Judah Maccabee's Avatar

    Bullshido Wikipedia Delegate

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    Posted On:
    1/24/2007 12:41am

    supporting memberhall of fameBullshido Newbie
     Style: Krav / (Kick)Boxing / BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Catastrophic usually means permanent, disfiguring injury.

    As someone with current neck problems, short of serious issues, you can usually train around injury in some way. For example, only doing drills where your neck isn't compromised, like being in someone's guard then trying to break it.

    Obviously, drills where you avoid getting stacked are out of the question.
  9. Torec_Scrail is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/24/2007 1:35am


     Style: TKD, uber BJJ n00b

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by kracker
    I've been wrestling a while now in addition to BJJ and quite frankly I admit it, it scares the hell out of me every time I get slammed. How common are broken necks in wrestling (Highschool style). I have no neck problems and can bridge on my forehead absolutely fine and everything but after seeing a couple paralyzed people at the hospital I do my community service at (not from wrestling, mostly car accidents) it is scaring the hell out of me that I may end up like that and wrestling consequently stopped being fun and I got way worse because now I play everything way to cautious. I am just curious if anyone has solid statistics about how likely it is for guys getting their neck snapped in wrestling accidents.
    I'm the same way, doesn't help being a lifeguard seeing vids of those people..training for spinals..and seeing people in hospitals..it;s a relatively small chance..so minute..but, if it happens to you...your screwed...I go crazy if I don't do something athletic in a couple days..even at least a lil run..if I could never walk..I can't see myself having a life..I'd prolly get over..but, I sure as hell wouldn't be happy.. If it makes you feel better, most people are scared about their neck doing back flips, the chances of you landing right on your head are slim..I also saw a guy bust one out right on the floor land right on his head and just get up and was fine. Takes a bit of force/really bad spot to do it.
  10. Goju - Joe is offline
    Goju - Joe's Avatar

    I am a Ninja bitches!! Deal with it

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    Toronto
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    Posted On:
    1/24/2007 10:06am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Improv comedy

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My son started wrestling last year in grade 7, prior to this he's been doing jiu jitsu for 2 years. so he knew how to front, side, and back break fall as well was used to been thrown.

    Anyways one day a kid breaks his leg from a fall in wrestling, I asked him didn't they teach the kid how to fall his answer was no. i asked if he was concerned about being hurt he said no i know how to fall.

    I never wrestled but is it common to spend no time on actually learning how to fall?

    I would guess yes because one of the ways of not being hurt is knowing when you're going to take a throw and go with it to minimize the impact and wrestling is all about fighting it 100% all the way.

    So to the wrestlers out there is that common? Did your wrestling programs spend any time drilling on break falls and such?
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